PPI's bad for Kidney's????

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Hello all,

I am just so confused and don't know what to do. I know everyone bad mouths omeprazole and PPI but I really feel like they saved my life. For two yrs I was against taking them and had constant chest pains, reflux, and lost 30 pounds because all I ate was chicken and rice. Now, after taking the meds I feel like I got my life back. I go out again with my husband and friends, I can eat again (still no chocolate or coffee) and am chest pain free. However, now I see reports of these meds damaging kidneys and I feel trapped. I can't go off the meds cuz the chest pains come right back. Any advice?

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  • Posted

    Hello Dane, it can be a difficult thing to choose between one potential nastiness and a known one, like the pains you've experienced through reflux, etc. Some of us have a very difficult time even thinking of taking a pill - even if it can ease a trouble - which makes it a personal and psychological matter. I suffered a PPI side-effect and persevered without any from then on. And that suits me. But it means making far more effort with diet and so on, so coming off a PPI can result in the same trouble kicking back in or developing again, if it was due to diet, stress and so on in the first place. Those things would have to be worked upon.

    Side-effects - minor and major - don't always affect everyone, so there is always that chance that you may or may not experience any. But clearly, it would be better - if possible - for any person with any illness to get along well enough without a med rather than with one.

    You have the option to try to improve your trouble via lifestyle and diet - unless you tried that and failed miserably - or to continue as you are with the benefit of the med, and take your chance of whatever trouble may or may not ensue down the line. I have put the measures I go by to help with gastritis below. Even on meds you should still have a try to see if any of them help you further. Best wishes.

    Several small/medium meals per day (I have seven medium, one every two hours or so), rather than fewer bigger ones, so you don't overfill your stomach. Eat relaxed, chew well. Be sat upright for and after meals, not bent or reclining, so you don't squash your stomach and press its contents upwards.

    Fried foods, high-fat foods/meats, dairy, high-salt foods, spicy-hot foods, tomatoes, onions, peppers, carbonated drinks, caffeine, alcohol and chocolate can all impact on stomach and reflux troubles for some people, so personal experimentation is key. Minty foods relax the lower oesophageal muscle, as do some of the above foods and drinks, which can let acid up easier, so they are bad. I use a fruity toothpaste, and strawberry gaviscon tablets for the now only occasional acid burn.

    Wholewheat bread, cereals, bananas, hardboiled eggs are a few of the foods that suit me, but there are pulses, rice, various beans (not kidney beans apparently) and many other things to try. Chicken is one of the best meats due to its lower fat content, though even that can hit me. Trial and error.

    Stress, excercise and bending activity that pressure and squeeze the stomach are also to be avoided. Be as calm and stress-free as you can.

    Having your last meal a few hours before bed can prevent or lessen reflux at night, but I found that waiting to be too empty caused hunger discomfort, assorted spasms and kept me awake or caused some burning through the spasms. I lie down about an hour and a half to two hours after last meal raised a bit on three pillows, on my right side, though the left side is usually recommended and there were test results to support this as being best for many people. Other people raise the bed-head itself about 6 to 8 inches or use a wedge affair..

    Another thing that helps me is to not burp after ten minutes after eating, as this can bring acid up and cause heartburn. I get the swallowed air out gently just after the meal, sittiing a little forward, then don't burp till after the next meal.

    Water triggering heartburn is common. It can happen even with non-ill people. I found that the best way to get my daily requirement is to drink around 140 ml or so ml with each meal, which, in my case, is added to by some drinks of a nutrition drink. So generally I don't have to drink between meals. Everyone has to find their routine to get what they need.

    In tests there was an indication that some people with reflux suffer heartburn through drinking water in several gulps because their lower oesophageal muscle doesn't open and close correctly when doing this with fluid, and so acid can escape upwards. But just adding water to your stomach between meals, when there is still food and fluids in there, will increase its volume and raise it nearer to the top where the muscle is, the pressure of which, if too much water is drunk, can then cause the muscle to open and let stomach fluid up. Cold water can also cause spasms, so sips of usual water is best.

    Some say to drink water only between meals at points when the stomach is empty, but this cannot be done in my case, where I need to eat every couple of hours or will lose more weight by slowing digestion down. So I find that a little drink of water with each bite of food that gets well chewed, then a few more af the end of the meal suits me. I also have water with two cereal meals as I avoid dairy milk, and have yet to try them with the likes of oat, rice, almond or soya milk. But they are good milk substitutes for people who don't/can't have dairy, unless a person has issues with them. But we are all different, so, again, trial and error is the way.

    An update is that I have tried a few very low-fat milk-shake style drinks lately, and they have not impacted badly on me compared to how, for example, butter on bread always did.

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  • Posted

    was your acid regurgitation constant too?
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    • Posted

      Hi, no, not constant. Worse in the first months, and first year as I learned about adjusting meal-size and the other measures, while the worst damage (through painkillers and antibs) healed a bit. The only times now that I'm hit with burn tend to be if I lie down a bit too far towards hunger. A couple of hours later a spasm, or hiccup affair can shoot a little acid up - there's always some being produced in the stomach.
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  • Posted

    So you are saying just one day without the medications and your chest will be in pain again. You mean heartburn?   You do undersatnd PPI's do help people but does not cure the source of the problem?  Only you by eating better can do this.  Did you check if you have any dificiency like magnesium which could be the source of the problem?  In my personal opinion if PPI's is working for you then just try to reduce the amount, instead of every day go down to every other day or every 3rd day.  If not, again in my personal opinion you need to decide yourself what's more important, because just the anxiety itself can  bring this up to a whole new level if you stick with a daily reutin of PPI's.
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  • Posted

    I have been taking PPI for almost 10yrs, would I stop, absolutely not!

    why? Because they have transformed my life, I suffered for 20yrs before relief was at hand. I can't cure my reflux by diet because my body naturally makes too much acid and I have a hiatus hernia which doesn't help. 

    My advice is keeping taking the PPI and if you are worried about side effects then never get in a car because they are mega dangerous and injure and kill people every day, PPI's don't do that's. 

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    • Posted

      I totally disagree with you-  They did nothing for me and just like you and me they help some and they do nothing for others.  That is why Dane has to decide herself.  Is you case severe and you can't eat any better or you have other options like eating better, or even a deficiency which is causing all the problems?  So my advise is to take the options if you have any, if not then do what WK said and live happy knowing that you took the only option you had.
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    • Posted

      Hi all, 

      YOU GUYS come on!!!!!

       all Dane is wanting is advice?

      we all have our options here on ppi's some have no choice and choose to stay on them others choose Not??

      im with wknight on this ( my choice) my reflux is so much worse NOT taking my medication.......I did a trial for 2weeks off them, and I was in hell not taking them. We are all different.

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    • Posted

      Hi Shelley, just out of interest, did you amend your diet and lifestyle for many months prior to stopping your PPI? Did you wean off the PPI over time? If you didn't do the former, and/or suddenly stopped the PPI, then there would be a possibility of the trouble hitting hard again, including through what is called rebound acid hypersecretion. This is why anyone who has been on a PPI for a long time must come off it slowly and with their doctor's guidance. You never know, if you were to give all the known measures to ease reflux troubles a try, and then slowly come off the PPI, you might be one of those who no longer needs it. Could be worth trying.

      The thing about advice is, as you, I and Papote say, we are all different, and that's why we cannot say to someone else that they should do what we do because we feel it is right for us. The best we can do is share knowledge and anything that we find helps us that just might help someone else with these despicable illnesses if they were to try it.

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    • Posted

      Hi Paul, 

      oh gosh yes, my doctor was brilliant........

      i do eat healthy, and keep active.......BUT UNFORTUNATLY for me not long ago I entered into the peri ( premenapause).

      and UNFORTUNATLY if one suffers with anything ie my reflux, migranes, and IBS can get worse!!!!!! The wonders and joy of being a women........ Sooooo I will continue taking my ppi's. But I won't be doing anything differently food wise I'm a slim size 10..,, in good shape just unfortunate to be in peri !!!!!!!!!!.

      but in years to come I will try again ????????.

      thankyou for that help of advice, much appreciated.

       

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    • Posted

      Sorry Shelley. Multiple troubles are always even more trying on us. I know that from experience too. You take care.
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    • Posted

      Sorry, I spelled your name wrong again. It's the result of my love of books and writers! (ie., Mary Shelley, Percy Shelley)
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    • Posted

      Thank you Shelly. I cannot explain the pain my body endured when NOT on the PPI's. The chest pains would start about 10:00 and last until 4 in the morning every night. I would feel like I was being stabbed in the chest over and over. It was a living hell. I tried every reflux trick for 5 yrs before taking the meds and nothing worked. i lived on chicken and ate nothing bad for reflux. I could not control it with diet. I just wanted to die and fell into a great depression. The meds changed my life and I am so thankful.
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    • Posted

      Hi, Dane, I think the course is clear for you. But if you become too worried about possible long-term PPI side-effects, enquire about the surgical options, though that matter too needs careful consideration of the different procedures and potential outcomes, and how the one called fundoplication is said to be irreversible.

      How long have you been on the med?

       

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    • Posted

      I have been on them for one yr - have you heard of the Stretta procedure on dr. oz? I have an appt. in a couple of weeks and am going to talk to my doc about it.
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    • Posted

      Hi Dane, Stretta is a relatively new and "minimally invasive" procedure that can be used as an alternative for people who don't want one of the others. Here are the basic details:

      Radiofrequency treatment. This is also known as the Stretta procedure. During endoscopy, high-energy waves are directed into the wall of the lower esophagus. The esophagus responds by producing small amounts of scar tissue. In most people, this reduces heartburn and other acid reflux symptoms. More than one radiofrequency treatment may be required to achieve a good result.

      Endoscopic procedures are usually effective but are not as good as surgery at treating acid reflux, generally speaking. However, they offer the significant advantages of not requiring incisions, general anesthesia, or a hospital stay.

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