pseudogout in neck

Posted , 7 users are following.

So I woke up in the middle of the night and my neck was so stiff I couldn't turn in either direction, and it hurt fairly seriously from even tiny movements.  Could this be pseudogout?

?At first I figured I just tweaked it, but the stiffness lasted through the day.  I finally started wondering about meningitis, but I felt fine otherwise, which didn't match.  It got better slowly over a week, so I just let it fade.  But just a few days later it has come back.

?Aspirin helps.  I have had (self-diagnosed) pseudogout in the knee and foot, just a few weeks ago.  I've had regular gout before as well, but have been taking celery seed and I think that's been 100% preventative on the regular gout.  I only started taking "pseudogout" seriously as a real diagnosis, as of a few weeks ago.

?Googling turns up a lot of stuff that says pseudogout (CPPD) in the neck, in the "yellow ligament" (Ligamentum flavum) does happen.  The call it rare, they find it in really old people, but hey I think I've got it too.

?Anybody else here have any similar experience?

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  • Posted

    Stiff neck is almost as common as the common cold, and just as sometimes a cold turns out to be double pneumonia, mostly it doesn’t. Equally the chances are that your stiff neck is a muscle strain of some kind. Warming and massaging it might help; so would painkillers. (Aspirin is very bad for ordinary gout btw). If it you also have a bad headache or problems with your eyesight you should see a doctor.

    As for pseudo/ordinary gout - why not see a rheumatologist? 

    Good luck with the neck. 

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  • Posted

    JX, whereabouts on the neck?

    beware that main arteries to the brain run up both sides of the neck, you can feel them and any blockages in these can be very serious and restrict blood flow to brain and cause a stroke

     

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    • Posted

      Where on the neck?  Well, I couldn't turn left or right, if I tried not only was there pain but some kind of feeling of resistance.  What made me think it might be pseudo-gout (which is different from regular gout, and afaik NSAIDs are recommended for pseudo-gout) is that pseudo-gout moves around from joint to joint as often as every few hours, and the specific pain points in my neck seemed to do that too, mostly.  The remnant now is mostly high on the right side of my neck.

      ?I was concerned that it could be something worse, but my experience with doctors is such that I tend not to run to them for every issue ... and when I finally do, the experience is generally disappointing.  I expect Star Trek medical tricorders and a shot of cordrazine to fix whatever ails me, and these seem unavailable in local facilities.

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    • Posted

      “Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition on cervical spine is very rare, and only 50 patients with this condition have ever been reported. In the literatures, the mean age of patients with cervical spine pseudogout is old (72.3 years old) and 84% of them are females. “

      The way to establish spinal pseudo-gout is through a CT scan.

      I think in the first instance a trip to the GP is in order.

      If it does turn out to be pseudogout you’ll be only the 51st specimen known to science!

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    • Posted

      Great, that would be my change to go to Harvard Medical School - as a patient!

      ?I saw that same cite.  I think it's silly.  How would they find any?  Who runs in for a CT scan when they wake up with a stiff neck, that's already much better two days later?  I'll bet if you took your CT scanner and advertised for cases and paid $1,000 for anyone who turned out to have it, you'd find another fifty in a week.  What would you say to an exterminator who said, "You have exactly 50 cockroaches"?

      ?Though I'm not sure I'd take a CT scan for $1,000 even if I was certain.  Maybe if it also entered winners in a drawing for a Mazda Miata.

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    • Posted

      If your doctor hasn’t seen the results he’s just guessing as there are several other things it could be, and someone of your age, pseudogout is often caused by something else.... unless of course half your family already have it? 
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    • Posted

      Mean both, the symptoms mimic other illnesses, but also other illnesses can cause it (copied and pasted, not mine):

       Pseudogout can often run in families, so many medical professionals believe it to be a genetic condition. Other contributing factors may include:

      hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid)

      excess iron

      magnesium deficiency

      overactive parathyroid gland

      hypercalcemia (too much calcium in the blood)

      Pseudogout can sometimes be associated with other illnesses, such as:

      hemophilia (a hereditary bleeding disorder that prevents the blood from clotting normally)

      ochronosis (a condition causing the deposit of a dark pigment in the cartilage and other connective tissues)

      amyloidosis (an abnormal buildup of protein in the tissues)

      hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid glands)

      hyperparathyroidism (an excessive amount of parathyroid hormone in the blood)

      hemochromatosis (an abnormally high level of iron in the blood)

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    • Posted

      My doctor seen it in my mri and yes gout does run in my family and also deposits that have to be cut out and removed my guess is that it's deposited in my neck and unable to be removed because of neck trauma from a car wreck.

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  • Posted

    Abracadabra let me wave my magic wand & hope it goes away. Ignorance is bliss. You can't take aspirin when you have gout, at any time, as it causes extreme gout pain. Go see a chiropractor and stop being a hypochondriac.

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    • Posted

      Worse type of person is one who thinks he can self-diagnose and self-medicate. I come from the medical world, if he were smart he'd visit a doctor or a gp or a chiropractor. Pain is a symptom of something gone wrong in your body. Do you sit around looking up possible diagnosis on the net for which doctor google never got a degree? I've heard people say in these forums, I think I'm about to die from the diagnosis a little pain I have in my stomach, according to dr. google. All to find out when they went to the doctor that it was gas. Really now, you came that close to dying, causing yourself stress, lessening your life units, when a simple trip to the doctor stopped it in its track? Sorry for my caddy attitude but I don't tolerate ignorance very well.   

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    • Posted

      Pretty much any time I've been involved first-hand or second-hand with the "medical world", it's only lead me to use Doctor Google more heavily. 

      ?I'm hoping for some AI doctors sooner rather than later, it can hardly be worse than your average overworked practitioner.

      The whole concept of medical "practice" is a century out of date.  Don't even get me started.

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    • Posted

      If you don't acquire the knowledge from books, but rely on no degree google, then your fate is pretty set to hocus pocus. AI is only going to confirm your lack thereof knowledge, and probably tell you that your pillow needs replacing and that no, you don't have pseudo-gout and in fact, you don't have gout at all.

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    • Posted

      Books tend to be a generation behind the state of the art, they are written by guys with thirty years experience, education forty years old, with a final chapter on "trends", which are completely obsolete when you pick up the book ten years after it was written.

      ?There is just too much medical knowledge to be had now for a human doctor to hold it in his head.  In fact this may have been true for the last twenty or thirty years.  All this fancy technology, and you might as well call the minimum wage help desk guy with questions or use Google, because that's what the doctor does, and it's not his pain.

      ?Worst of all is this "practice" concept, which last made sense about 1900.  "Don't EXPERIMENT on your patients", they say.  IOW, don't think.  Don't use any of that science we made you study as an undergrad.  Just smirk at your patient and start him out with treatment #1 on the tree, that's "practice".  OMG.

      ?Yes, Doctor Google needs to be used carefully and intelligently, too.  The medical profession last time around *hated* the very idea of AI diagnostics, much less prescribers, but that was thirty years ago.  Doctors today have grown up with more technology and I think will support it much more strongly - but judging from my recent experience, where I purposely set out to try some younger doctors to see - they are not there yet.  Unfortunately.

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    • Posted

      Over the next decade AI is going to come into medicine much more as it constantly becomes more advanced and cheaper. Companies such as IBM, Google and Amazon are literally investing billions in this technology. Medicine will have to go that route to drive down costs and reduce human errors. The introduction of computer enhanced pharmacists already exists in larger hospitals and reduces mistakes. 

      I’m sure that in 30 years most basic diagnosis will be done by a machine. Tests show that in some areas they are already making better diagnosis’ than humans. One advantage that an AI application has is that is constantly reading the latest research - something which all but the most dedicated human doctor could do. 

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