Re nebulizers

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Hi

I wonder er if anyone has his/her own personal nebulizer at home to use during an exacerbation? When my husband had a terrible cough we had to go to the clinic so he could be put on a nebulizer. I remember the nurse adding some medication to it. I have seen some for sale and wondered if anyone has the correct information on how to use one at home. And what is the medication added to it? (My husband absolutely hates having to go to the clinic to use one). Pardon me if I sound ignorant about this issue, but since he has no longer got an appointment with the specialist unless we go private, or he gets really sick again, I thought I would make use of your expertise. There's been some great help on this site. Managed to get our own probe or oximeter today as advised by kind people, here. Any idea what lowest reading oxygen level should give concern Thank you for all your help and advice.

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11 Replies

  • Posted

    Hi Jonah!  

    I have a nebulizer at home which was given to me by my doctor several years ago when I contacted H1N1.  I was prescribed albuterol to be used in it.  I live in the US and I was not aware that you could just go out and purchase one.  I would suggest that you ask your doctor if one could be prescribed for your use at home.

     

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  • Posted

    Hi ,I was diagnosed back in 1992 and at that time I was put on a nebuliser 4 plus times a day so I when I came home we bought our own Incase I needed it .i found it very useful ,we had to buy it back then but I think you can sometimes get them from GP ,I've now bought my second one as I think the other one was over worked haha ,your GP should prescribe the ventalin capsules to put in the machine ,you can also buy the nebulisers from Lloyd's chemist or Amazon ,if you go on you tube type in using your nebuliser it will show you some short video information,as you are private medical care your respitory nurse should also give you advise .best wishes ,please let us know how you get on . 
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    • Posted

      GP's are not allowed to prescribe nebulisers now, only the medication. He had one in his surgery at one time, but was forced by the GMC to not let patients use it. This goes back to about 2009 when all the cut backs started.
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  • Posted

    I'm in the UK , my community matron brought me my nebuliser a few years ago. I only used when advised to when I had chest infections etc. I've only just started using daily a few weeks ago as my inhalers no longer help me. I use salbutamol and ipratroprium nebs 4 times daily. This was approved by my consultant. I'm not sure you should be using a nebuliser unless advised to .
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    • Posted

      I was refused a nebulizer at my UK respitory clinic some years back. However, when I told my GP that I had used my friend's one which saved me going to hospital, he advised me to buy one and he would prescribe both Salbutamol and Ipratropium Bromide to put into the nebuliser and this is what I have done. It cost my son £100 for the neb. but it has kept me out of hospital for a long time. Our local Chest Clinic no longer suppy nebs or the maintainance of them like they used to.
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    • Posted

      4 times a day seems a bit much to me. I was diagnosed with COPD back in 1990 and was told by my GP not to over use it,  as it makes your heart race. However, it may be different for you, but I have since had 2 strokes and 2 heart attacks and stents fitted, so maybe he is a big cautious because of my condition. The Salbutomel inhaler is fairly useless, as I expect many have found out, but the preventative inhalers containing steroids are effective.
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  • Posted

    Hi Jonah,  Yes I have my own personal nebuliser at home which I bought in Lidl, it was not espensive and has been a great boon to me as there isn't always one available at the Clinic. However I only use it when the doctor gives me the meds to put in it!!! But she also gave me a saline solution to use at my own disgression if my chest started to feel tight.  The Saline just loosens the phelgm and helps during an attack.  Hope this is helpful.
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    • Posted

      This is very helpful to know about the saline solution. Next time I see my GP I will see what he can do. I only use mine if I over-exert myself or have a chest infection, but I do suffer from a stuffed up nose and post nasal drip, so this might be helpful to me. Thanks for the information.
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  • Posted

    If you live in the UK then clinics no longer supply nebulisers to patients. However, if you see your GP he may be able to prescribe the medicine that goes into the nebuliser.  If you can afford to buy one and he is willing to prescribe the medication, there will be full instructions on how to use it with the nebuliser. It is very easy, you unscrew the mouthpiece and break open the ampule and put in the liquid (whichever meds the doctor thinks is necessary) usually Salbutomel and maybe Ipratropium Bromide if he thinks it is necessary.
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    • Posted

      Thank you Outhwaite. The next time my husband needs a doctor, I shall bring up the subject. We do not live in the UK but we don't mind buying one ourselves anyway.
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