READ THIS. An explanation and solution to a common cause of Prostatitis

Posted , 8 users are following.

I've had Chronic Prostatitis and recovered from it. My journey was long and hellish. What I am going to pass on has been earn't in blood and tears.

My view.

Chronic Prostatitis is caused by muscular dysfunction in the pelvis. The thing that causes this muscular dysfunction is sacro-iliac joint dysfunction. This is a mis-alignement of the bones of the pelvis.

At sometime in your life, probably 10-20 years ago, you fell or banged your bum/lower back. This force was enough to slightly shift the sacro-iliac joints out of alignment.

Once the sacro-iliac joint is not functioning properly, the muscles that surround the joint become tense to try to hold the disordered joint in place. The pelvis becomes twisted. This is not something that will commonly show up on an MRI.

This twist travels throughout your spine and will affect you from your feet to your toes.

Within the Pelvis, there is a Sacral nerve called the Pudendal nerve. This nerve innerverates the anal sphincter, bladder neck and sexual organs. As the pelvis muscles are tight, they squeeze on the Pudendal nerve, causing it to send 'disturbed' signals to the organs it services. Your bum will be tight, your bladder neck will be unstable and you make have sexual function problems. As the pelvis is tilted and twisted, the pudendal nerve also now has to pass through a slightly different path, this also can stretch or squeeze the nerve.

With a disordered bladder neck, urine will spurt into the Prostate causing it to be inflamed.

SO HOW DO I FIX IT?

You need to find an EXCELLENT Osteopath or Chiropractor. Ask around friends and family for someone they recommend. You need to be checked for any form of spinal misalignment. You pelvis should be checked for any twist or tilting. This can then be corrected over weeks or even months of treatment.

As the pelvis re-aligns, the pudendal nerve will be released, the bladder neck will then calm down and so the Prostate will work normally.

Good luck guys. Been there. Learn't this the hard way.

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14 Replies

  • Posted

    Hi David,

    I have a re-occuring SI injury from rugby in my early 20s. Twenty years later and I've started getting prostatis, most recent bout started mid-Feb 13 and continues, so I've had it for about 3 months. Over the last 5 years I've been a mountain biker but have stopped in the last 12 months as it tends to put the SI out of place.

    I had breast cancer at the end of last year, which you'll appreciate is very rare in men. About 100pa for every 20 million of population. Fortunately it was non-invasive so following a male masectomy, I've had no follow up chemo nor radiotherapy. Given my recent history I've had PSA, US and urine cytology to rule out cancers in the prostate and bladder, with all tests coming up good. So it looks as though prostatitis is the diagnosis. My SI has been out of kilter for the last few months and I've been questioning myself whether there could be any connection between SI and prostate. I'm seeing the chiro this afternoon to get the process underway!

    Thanks for the heads up. Cheers

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  • Posted

    This sounds very logical and likely. I had horseback riding injuries in my early 20's that led to back problems, and nerv problems in my legs. A hard fall on ice on my butt preceeded urinary retention problems that a Greenlight laserTURP didn't solve.

    I've suspected myself that the whole gamut of symptoms that have been labeled non-bacterial prostatitis or BPH or LUTS or Interstitial Cystitis, may in fact be a nerve/muscle dysfunction of the sphincters as much as anything else.

    But I don't believe in chiropractors and wouldn't be willing to go to one for months of treatment on the chance it might work.

    I wonder if there are any exercises one could do for themselves (maybe some sort of yoga or tai chi?) that could improve the functioning of the sacro-iliac joint dysfunction? I know people who have tried pelvic floor exercises and therapy for this condition have been universally disappointed. In fact, every therapy and procedures for this chronic condition have helped some, but left millions of people disappointed

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  • Posted

    Hi Bob,

    For the 6-8 weeks after my last post in May I weekly rotated between a chiropracter and acupunturist. I found I was getting too much manipulation with the chiro and if anything the problem was getting worse. I stopped the chiro and continued with acupuncture. There is a line of energy in the body that serves the pelvic girdle area, and the acupuncture focuses on getting your natural energy to that part of the body. Steadily the pelvic / prostate paint went over the weeks, but the SI discomfort lingers. For a couple of weeks I also did some floor exercises which i found on the internet which focuses on that part of the body: lying on your back, knees bent, pillow between knees and 30 reps x 4 of squeezing the pillow. Lying on side, upper arm bent on hip for stability, legs out straight, and lifting the upper leg for 20 reps x 3. Again, lying on back, knees bent, large elastic style stretch band around knees (ones that pilates people use), and pushing both knees out. 20 reps x 3.

    As part of ruling out any other bigger issues, I had a colonoscopy which was all good. However, the doc said that listening to the problem summary it sounded like I had 'pelvic instability', which is a recognised medical problem. He told me to see a physio which I've yet to arrange as the pain has gone into abeyance. I have previously done bikhram yoga and a little bit of pilates but have personally found that sessions sometimes put too much strain on the back. After one session I spent 3 days in bed as I couldn't walk! I'm yet to explore a less intense yoga but have no doubt there will be a style which benefits SI / pelvis.

    I recently spent 3 weeks away from the desk on holiday, walking every day and found the general pain in the pelvis and SI simply dropped away. I now associate all of the discomfort in the pelvic part of the body to sitting at a desk for 9-10 hours everyday with the hip being bent 90 degrees, tied in with having had the originally injury. I also swim twice / week which definitel helps.

    So in summary, I see pelvic instability / SI problems to be ongoing and it is a case of managing it going forward and limiting the discomfort. A mix of not sitting at a desk too long; seeing the acupuncturisst regularly (for me maybe once / month); occasionally doing my floor exercises (say 2/ week); having a couple of sessions with a physio, and identifying a soft yoga will collectively make the problem manageable.

    If you find any wonder solutions lt me know. Cheers

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  • Posted

    Hi Mark,

    I haven't had any symptoms of SI or Pelvis, but have had all of the symptoms of LUTS which is alternately called non-bacterial prostatitis by men, and interstitial cystitis by men and women. That all may be doctor speak for them not really knowing what is actually causing these symptoms. All have similar symptoms of urgency, burning, frequency, bladder spasms and poor flow or retention while urinating. I have had all of them. Luckily I rarely had bladder or pelvic pain when I wasn't urinating.

    Your exercises have done your SI and pelvis good, but have they done anything for your prostatitis?

    From what I have concluded in researching various forums and websites and my own symptoms of several years, is that there seems to be some sort of problem with the bladder and sphincters that is often at the root of these lower urinary tract symptoms. And since the sphincters are controlled by nerves that cross through the pelvis, I can see where that also may be a connection.

    As far as wonder solutions, I don't think many have found them. For some lucky people, a physical obstruction like an enlarged prostate or cyst or tumor or stricture causing a blockage might be fixed (usually temporarily) by surgery. I had a Green Light laser turp that improved my symptoms about 30%, and a year later I am experiencing some additional 40% improvement with some lifestyle changes, creating about a 70% improvement overall.

    But from all the reading I have done, for most people it's a lifelong practice of finding small tweaks in their diet or exercise or medications that provide incremental bits of symptom relief that is often temporary, then searching for other tweaks to help reduce the symptoms to manageable levels.

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  • Posted

    Hi Bob,

    The pain in my prostate has definitely diminished, as good as gone. The reason for mentioning all the pelvis/SI issues is becuase I think everything was linked. i think the root of my problem was SI due to an earlier injury. To compensate my back went slightly out of kilter, which then put undue strain on the whole pelvic region, with bladder, sphincter, prostate all under pressure. The upshot was that by getting my SI sorted out, it had the dual impact of sorting everything else out, including taking away the prostate pain. I'm hopeful this positive position will continue!

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  • Posted

    Hi Mark,

    Thanks for the additional info. I've reread your posts and it sounds like the exercises and acupuncture have really worked for you. I agree it must all be connected, and will look for ways to loosen up/strengthen my own pelvis and back muscles as well.

    Best Regards,

    Bob

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  • Posted

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  • Posted

    Hi,

    I must thank you for this post. I have been dealing with non bacterial prostatitis for 10 years. I have tried everything and had more fingers up my ass then I wish to say. PT, urologist, natural herbs by the dozens, Soundwave therapy, cipro, flomax flexaril, and could get minimal relief. My urinary track felt like hot battery acid was running through it and the only thing that would help was a heating pad and ice packs.... I made an appointment with a chiropractor after reading your post and sure enough my left SI joint had dropped by 2 inches throwing my pelvic floor into spasms causing my prostate to inflame causing a living Hell! He got me back in line and I almost instantly felt better. Now 24 hrs latter and 95% are gone!!! I was treating the symptoms not the problem and I had to find the solution on my own. I am a 44 health active male on TRT with an incredible sex drive. This has been a long and difficult road but thanks to your post it's over. THANK YOU!!! Anyone with pelvic issues needs to get xrays and take them to a chiropractor

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    • Posted

      Hi Michael,

      Are your symptoms still alleviated / solved to this date? Please let me know.

      My symptoms are: penis tip tingling, penis pain, painful erections, urinary urge feelings, PN symptoms.

      Did you have the above symptoms? If so, were they alleviated by the realignment from your chairopractor?

      Cheers,

      David

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    • Posted

      Hi, I do have a SI joint issues  and had an MRI done of my lower back and pelvis.  They show nothing that would lead to prostatitis.  I have had many tests to check for bacteria and they are also negative or inconsistent so it's unlikely caused by bacteria.  I am managing the symptoms pretty well and taking it day by day.  My prostate inflammation has come and gone over the last 10 years so it's a mystery of the cause.   

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    • Posted

      Thanks for your response, you mentioned in one of your messages above that when you saw a chiropractor (based on OPs recommendation about hip misalignment) that he realigned you and you felt 95% relief from the symptoms.  Has that relief been sustained to this day? Did/do your symptoms specifically match any of mine listed?

      Thanks

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  • Posted

    SI Joint condition is vital, and both are the focal points of lower back issues. By experimentation I learned how to self adjust and pop my lowest lumbar vertebra back into place. Instant relief! But my prostate issues are ancillary to any back issues. I've suffered from lifelong intermittent prostatitis, which began as acute around the age of 20. Now in my 60's, this damnable gland is more problematic, which is being managed by tamsulosin.

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