respite time

Posted , 3 users are following.

Hi fellow neckers,

I think we all find that some days are better than others regarding feeling \"not too bad\" and very ill.

I just wondered what is the average time between really bad days.

I find after 2 or 3 days ok, it comes back with a vengeance.

What are your experiences please?

Tony

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  • Posted

    [quote:e3da8d2c8d=\"adrian18\"]Hi fellow neckers,

    I think we all find that some days are better than others regarding feeling \"not too bad\" and very ill.

    I just wondered what is the average time between really bad days.

    I find after 2 or 3 days ok, it comes back with a vengeance.

    What are your experiences please?

    Tony[/quote:e3da8d2c8d]

    Hiya Tony smile

    Hmmmm, I'll give a before and after senario if I may? smile

    Before the op, I had no respite at all, I would perhaps get the odd hour when it wasn't pummeling me.

    Post op.... now almost 18 months after the op, things are getting better, Monday I had no pain or stiffness at all, it was heaven, and it felt very odd as I seemed to be on my guard all day for the beast to be let out of it's cage, however, I enjoyed that day enormously, sadly things reurned to normal yesterday, with a low pitched constant achy,painy stiffness blinkin horrible tiredness, grotty yucky feeling.

    Hope this helps

    Take Carexx smile

    Em

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  • Posted

    This is a really interesting question. I can't believe it hasn't flagged itself up before now....it's certainly been at the back of my mind for years. The possibility of a repeating pattern for the occurance of bad days.

    I know that whatever sort of phase I'm going through, every seventh day ( at present it's Thursdays ) is always the worst, without fail. Guaranteed morning headache. This Wed. nite I slept (if you could call it sleeping) with a headache and so, when I woke this morning, I still had a stonker, but it eased down after an hour or so. But for the last year or so, it's always been Thursdays.....before that it was Wednesday for a long time and before that it was Fridays . There must be some pattern to this ! Perhaps I'm waiting for some Austrian scientist to respond... \" Ja, Ja, ve can zee ze pattern vit this problem, no?\"

    I've always thought it might be a result of a build up of unreleased tensions, maybe due to use of painkillers, like putting the aches on hold until I could sort them all out on one day, but that's unlikely...I'm simply not that much in control. More likely, it seems to me, is some bio clock which must right itself every seven days. I know that the day before, Wednesday, I'm usually a bit lightheaded and peculiar and, although I usually feel alright, I tend to get strange reactions from people. I think I carry a peculiar look of foreboding as though my body knows whats coming on Thursday, and it shows, but I'm not aware of it. A strange mixture of chirpiness and foreboding to have to present to anyone. Perhaps I can't hide the looming dread as well as I'd like to think. One aspect of this is that where, physically, our bodies are very aware of any oncoming pain, mentally we subconciously choose to deny the prospect and perhaps portray ourselves at odds with our condition. Does this ring any bells?

    Hope this doesn't sound too loony fringe, but that's probably how I'm going to assess it unless someone else reports something similar.

    Gerry

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  • Posted

    Typing chronic pain into the search bar from here will take you to some interesting reports. I'd put the link up but,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, smile

    Emxx smile

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  • Posted

    \"While acute pain is a normal sensation triggered in the nervous system to alert you to possible injury and the need to take care of yourself, chronic pain is different. Chronic pain persists. Pain signals keep firing in the nervous system for weeks, months, even years. There may have been an initial mishap -- sprained back, serious infection, or there may be an ongoing cause of pain -- arthritis, cancer, ear infection, but some people suffer chronic pain in the absence of any past injury or evidence of body damage. Many chronic pain conditions affect older adults. Common chronic pain complaints include headache, low back pain, cancer pain, arthritis pain, neurogenic pain (pain resulting from damage to the peripheral nerves or to the central nervous system itself), psychogenic pain (pain not due to past disease or injury or any visible sign of damage inside or outside the nervous system). \"

    Courtesy of a chronic pain report.

    I think pain is far more complex than we think.

    Take Care

    Emxx smile

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  • Posted

    thanks for replies Em and Gerry.

    I can empthise with Gerry in particular. With me after a bad weekend I always think \"monday will be better\" and usually it is !!

    I cant explain why. What a devilish condition this is

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