rivaroxaban

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I've been on warfarin for just over a year and have to be on it for life but want to change to Rivaroxaban as there is no regular INR checks. My GP said that it can't be done as no-one has ever been on Rivaroxaban long term. Can anybody tell me if this is correct? or have I been fobbed off.

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  • Posted

    There are tests being carried out at the moment to ascertain the suitability of rivoroxaban long-term; it isn't recommend for this now. One reason is that some problems with bleeding have arisen, and they are trying to see if a lower dose can still have the desired anticoagulant effect. So no, you're not being fobbed off. But it's true that rivoroxaban is more expensive than Warfarin.....
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  • Posted

    Hi Rob. I have just started on Apixaban which is a new anticoagulant along with Rivoroxaban. I did not want to go on Warfarin for the same reason that you want to come off it. I know this is a new drug, but the problem with internal bleeding is no different to being on Warfarin. I was recommended to go on this new drug by my Cardiac Rehabilitation Nurse and also a doctor friend of mine has been on it for the past six months! I think you will find that it does all come down to expense but I was also told that Apixaban is gentler on the stomach. Good luck.
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  • Posted

    I wanted to come off Warfarin but my doctor actually said there was no antidote for the particular drug I was requesting now whether this applies to Rivaroxaban also I`m not sure. So I have come to terms with being on Warfarin and if I have to go each week to have my INR checked so be it at least they have got my back!!
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    • Posted

      Cardiologist trying to persuade me to take Rivaroxaban after I stopped taking warfaring due to pain in my weight bearing joints said that an antidote to Rivaroxabn is being developed and should be available soon.

      Consultants are quite happy to prescribe the much more expensive drug as it does not come from their budget. 

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  • Posted

    Hi Marion, yes you are quite right about warfarin having an antedote which is Vitamin K. I really don't think we need to worry about there not being an antidote for these other tablets yet. I have been told by my medical doctor friend who is on Apixaban that really there is no real cause for concern because you would just stop taking the tablets and then the blood would clot. He really thinks it all comes down to cost!!!
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    • Posted

      This would rather depend on how quickly the body can eliminate these other anticoagulants. Vitamin K can be administered in an emergency to activate clotting while Warfarin is still in the body.
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    • Posted

      You could bleed to death in the 24 hours that it takes to get out of your system. A neighbour had a massive stomach bleed from polyps he was not aware off. He was given vitamin K and blood transfuions.

       

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    • Posted

      Sorry that is wrong. Your blood just doesn't clot. There have been many deaths from these newer anto anticoagulants where people have bed out and Drs could do nothing to stop it. The makers of Xarelto have recently settled a $640million lawsuit according to the reports. Google the side effects and warnings, they are extremely dangerous drugs without antidotes. Your Doc needs to reeducate himself.
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    • Posted

      I know many of these posts are over 1 year old..BUT do people who take BOOD THINNERS KNOW THAT IT IS VERY DANGEROUS TO "JUST STOP TAKING THEM ONECE STARTED? IF YOU " IF YOU "JUST STOP taking them ,  YOU ARE PRONE TO STROKE!   READ up on internet or talk to doctors..

      I get very upset at some of the posters who give  such ridiculous "advice" TAKE POSTS HERE WITH A GRAIN OF SALT ,,,none of us are doctors and some posts may cause death ...or stroke...BEWARE 

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    • Posted

      My boyfriend, on warfarin, had an accident with a head injury that caused bleeding in his brain. (His INR was really high for some reason even though he checks regularly and hadn't had that problem.). They administered antidote and bleeding stopped. Twenty four hours could have caused a lot more trouble.

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  • Posted

    If you have had a replacement heart valve the new anticoagulants are contra indicated.
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  • Posted

    Hi Rob,

    Rivaroxaban is one of the new NOAC's and what you say is correct but is only half the story. There is also no antidote at this stage. So in an emergency - with Warfarin the effects can be reversed, these new NOAC's cannot. To the best of my knowledge they are usually prescribed to those patients who have big problems with Warfarin, i.e. a history of unstable INR readings, etc. etc. NOAC's are also considerably more expensive than Warfarin and therefore some GP's and CCG's will not prescribe them unless they have to. If you haven't already done so I suggest you read NICE Guidelines on NOAC's.

    John

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  • Posted

    in an emergency whereby you injure yourself in an accident or you happen to bleed internally due to an adverse drug interaction then the effects of Warfarin can be reversed quickly whereas they cant with Rivaroxaban. The only option currently with Rivaroxaban is to let your body get rid it it naturally - the usual daily dose  (20mg) has a half life of ~12 hours  so potentially up to 24 hours before your blood regains its ability to clot naturally.

     I am on Rivaroxaban to treat a PE and I had an adverse effect after taking it for 5 days after which I started peeing blood (haematuria) - it cleared up after 3 days and I have had no recurrence for nearly 6 weeks now. I  underwent a number of tests etc which have all been clear and suggests that it was due to an adverse effect /interaction to the Rivaroxaban. Internal bleeding is relatively common with Rivaoxaban and it can affect up to 1 in 10 people taking it.               

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