Run Marathon

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can i still run marathon after Partial knee replacement?

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15 Replies

  • Posted

    I bet you could but why would you want to shorten the life of a new knee?

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  • Posted

    oh my gosh ! NO! I was a runner and did alot of miles , lots of half marathons.

    I totally get the running ! was hard to give up . but i do not want to wear knee out in a year.

    I to had a partial . ( 3 years this MAY)

    Still have to be careful with overdoing it with the exercise.

    Check out CHICO MARX to see what is acceptable and what is not.

    Debbie

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  • Posted

    Sure...if you want the docs to re-replace your knee in a few years. Running/jogging puts a 5-18 times your weight load on your knee. What do you think that will do to the complex mechanical device that's working as your "knee"? Running is the #1 no-no after a knee replacement. Any activity that pounds or twists the knee is off limits...

    The List

    After my hip replacement in 2009, I had to give up 45 years of playing hockey or destroy the new hip in three years. But you always have a choice and free will...

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  • Posted

    I read the no-no list that Chico Marx posted, and I agree 100%. We were told in our joint class before surgery that running/jogging was out forever. But no one ha as ever mentioned whether or not we will ever be able or allowed to kneel! All posts are appreciated!

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    • Posted

      Kneeling is absolutely doable but problematic. The pain will probably lessen over the years but also, probably, never completely go away. That's because the source of the pain is not the knee itself. After all, it's now metal and plastic...no pain. Instead, the pain is nerve based. So much was cut into and reattached during surgery that the nerves may never fully regenerate...hence, the NERVE pain.

      You will most likely not ever be able to kneel pain free on cement, tile, hardwood, etc. The nerves won't let you. The fix is that when doing things inside, kneel on a 4" foam pad; outside, wear padded tactical knee pads. Simple as that...ask anyone who is 5+ years post-op...I'm almost three.

      PS: This is not a universal constraint as there may be those lucky few who escape this fate. Ya never know in advance if you will be among them.

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  • Posted

    Running a marathon with a knee replacement TKR /TKA ? Absolutely not recommend - not even a Mini-Marathon! However, walking, briskly (forwards and backwards )and in the swimming pool daily together with weekly physio therapy has been the best recovery routine for me; Bangkok-Johnny. Orthopedic Patient experience: Post-traumatic arthritis. One primary TKA, chronic Infection, two additional operations and a Two-Stage TKA Revision (Sep 2019). Aqua Therapy, Pool Walk. Swimming has additional benefits. Overall wellbeing and better sleep. Increased appetite, too. Best regards, Bangkok-Johnny

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  • Posted

    I have the Stryker Triathlon joint too. This past saturday was my one year anniversary. I ran 1 mile doing walk run intervals. i feel fine this morning. i plan to slowly increase my running distance using this method. I KNOW there are risks. There is a growing # of surgeons that are rethinking there position on post joint replacement activities. it comes down to personal choice! what ever activity level you choose, listen to your body!!!

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  • Posted

    Sorry that I have to disagree with Kenny...it is NOT a matter of personal choice. It is completely a matter of what activity the joint can take and how long it will last under specific stress loads. These are not personal decisions; they are manufacturing specifications.

    That said, yes, there are some newer knee technologies that are supposed to handle heavier loads and allow people more freedom in their activity choices. However, the operative word (no pun intended) is "newer". They are supposedly designed to let a patient resume more stressful activities but do they really deliver on that promise? The answer is that no one knows...or will know for years to come. Will one of these latest technologies last the same 25 years under the increased pressure on the joint? I guess we won't know for sure for 25 more years.

    Finally, yes, it is a personal decision to take the RISK as long as you know that it is a risk to believe the manufacturer without any significant body of real-world data to back up their claims. It's guinea pig time. But, in a way, we're ALL guinea pigs. We live with these mechanical devices inside our bodies and hope everything goes well and stays well. Works out for most...doesn't work out for some. Roll the dice...make your choice. Sometimes you're the windshield...sometimes you're the bug...

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    • Posted

      CHICO, You start out by saying that you disagree with me that its not personal choice. Then you go on to acknowledge there are newer joints and surgical techniques. Then you go onto to say it is a personal choice if they know the risks. I believe ive said that on numerous occasions! I have never told anyone that they should start running again. I have said, do your research and to have a good relationship with your DOCTOR! I have done both and for me it is worth the risk. It does come down to personal choice, As i have also said, no matter what activity level you choose to do, listen to you body!!

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    • Posted

      The problem is that there is no long-term science to back up the longevity of these new devices. What if you pound the knee by running marathons and the thing only holds up five or seven years? That's the risk. The unanswered question is whether or not these new models actually last 25 years under that load. No one can give you an answer to that. For me, I gave up 45 years of hockey as soon as my doc leveled with me about my new hip. Same with my knee. I avoid all the banned activities because I will not take the chance of having a revision...which is never the same as a first knee.

      If someone truly believes the manufacturer that the device will last 25 years under marathon-training and participation conditions, then go for it. Me? I want to see the data.

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    • Posted

      Mine have lasted 20 and 18½ years and are still going strong. I was told at the time of my first op that running and activities that caused impact or twisting was a no go. I took the advise rather than chancing having to have a revision done after only a few years, but it is a personal choice. I think I made the right choice for me.

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