Secondary Hypothyroidism

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Hi, Has anyone else got secondary hypothyroidism, with low TSH?

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  • Posted

    Hello MarieC,

    What actually is secondary hypothyroidism?

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    • Posted

      Hi Libralady, It's when it's caused by something else, in my case either the pituitary or hypothalmus, I think it's called central hypothyroidism in the USA, in the UK it would be called secondary.
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  • Posted

    Hello Marie,

    Having either hypo- or hyper- thyroidism as a secondary condition is common. It simply means that the thyroid issue you're having is not the SOURCE - that there is something else that is the source of your thyroid becoming hypo.

    I was diagnosed with hyper- thyroidism (from a blood test) about 18 months ago. I began treating only the thyroid and when the doctor told me that my levels were "normal" after a blood test (i.e. no more hyperthyroidism), and I still felt awful with worsening symptoms, I knew instinctively that is wasn't my thyroid that was the REAL issue.

    Because I'm not too keen on conventional medicine and very much into natural treatments, supplements and herbs, I did lots of my own research and realized that it is my adrenals that are the source of my health issues. Often, the adrenals are the source of many other hormonal issues, especially thyroid issues. 

    Your health will not get better by only focusing on the thyroid. You need to know the source, and it is likely the adrenal glands. I saw my chiropractor recently, who also does many other things, such as muscle-testing, and he said my adrenals were functioning at only 40%, on the verge of failure.

    Best of luck!

    Veronica 

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    • Posted

      Hello!

      Adrenal fatigue can be mild to moderate to severe. When severe, it's usually referred to as adrenal exhaustion (v. fatigue). Our busy and stressful lifestyles can cause us to "go, go, go" for years and not realize that our adrenals are getting more and more fatigued, until a time when the body can't handle too much more stress (physical, mental, emotional). Then we start to have symptoms that we no longer can ignore or solve with some caffeine!

      Certain personalities are more prone to getting it - those who often worry; who always take care of everyone else first (before themselves); those who always have a need to be productive; and those who have a hard time just resting and relaxing.

      Depending on the severity of adrenal fatigue, there are different protocols. There are many herbs and supplements that can help. If you read up on "adaptogenic herbs" you will find two in particular - ashwagandha and rhodiola - to be very effective. These herbs "adapt" to your body's particular needs and help the adrenals and the thyroid (whether the thyroid is underactive OR overactive). 

      Many people with adrenal issues are also very deficient in the B vitamins, such as B12, riboflavin, etc... I'm not a huge red meat fan, and I even gave it up for a time several years ago, but I now realize that my body feels much better and I am more energetic when I eat a few bites of red meat. I usually only like filet, and I don't have it a lot, but I know my body needs it. Turkey is actually better than chicken, but protein in general is very good. Organic eggs, too. If you can, eat the most natural meats possible, preferably grass fed and no hormones. Organic veggies when you can, too.

      Prayer and meditation help greatly for calming down the mind and body. And getting away from people and situations (job perhaps) that are stressful. Over time, these things take their toll on your health!

      I had mild adrenal fatigue years ago, and a divorce and other stressful circumstances in my life caused extreme stress almost constantly for several years. My body finally started to react - heart palpitations, anxiety, depression (depression that also has a physical cause due to the dysfunctional adrenals), extreme fatigue, weakness (especially in my legs where I can barely walk or keep my balance some days), and digestive issues, too name a few!

      Mild to moderate adrenal fatigue can be treated much more effectively and takes much less time to heal than moderate to severe adrenal exhaustion (like I have). And the treatment is much different. For example, with severe exhaustion, like I have, I can't take too many supplements or vitamins, as my body doesn't assimilate them and use them properly, which means they float around in my body and become toxic, which makes my condition worse. People with mild adrenal fatigue can handle more vitamins and supplements - their body's are able to use them. 

      Also, remember that depending on the severity, exercise can be a bad thing. It is stress on the body, and doesn't allow your adrenals to heal. Slow and short walks or bike rides are best if the adrenal fatigue is moderate to severe. 

      For myself, it will take 12-18 months for me to full recover, although I will have to be careful not to stress myself out too much for the rest of my life! Some days when I am stressed about something or don't get to take an afternoon nap (which I often need), I pay for it the next day or two and am REALLY exhausted! Wired, but tired!

      The first step in MY recovery is to relax and do as little as possible that will stress my body or mind. My adrenals need to recover enough to a basic functioning. Then I can start taking more vitamins and supplements. I also need to detox my body, but that wouldn't be good for me to do now because it is a stressor to my body, and also my digestive system is very sluggish so the toxins that would be released would not be able to move out of the body quick enough. 

      Right now I take a vitamin B complex capsule that I got from my chiropractor. I am so depleted in B vitamins that I need to take 6 capsules daily. I also am taking a calming herbal supplement, also from my chiropractor. I've started taking SAM-e (an amino acid) that has been proven to be very effective in treating depression, but is not a drug. I recommend reading carefully about SAM-e before taking it, as it needs to be taken on an empty stomach, and you don't want to take a brand that has mannitol in it, as mannitol can make your stomach cramp up badly (don't ask why most companies put it in theirs...silly, huh?). 

      Anyway, most people with debilitating adrenal exhaustion, like me, feel similar - like the go-getter person we used to be has been taken away from us. That will also make one depressed! I am a 47-year-old female who had many achievements and successes in my life, but kind of feeling useless these days.

      I'm fortunate I met my fiance and he understands me and I have the ability to stay at home and not work a 9-5 job, which I don't think I could even do right now. I manage his business (he owns a semi) and that, fortunately, is something I can do part-time, and at home.

      Let me know if you have any more questions. I'd be glad to give you more info or offer suggestions or further resources. Self-education is very beneficial, so read and research all you can! 

      What are YOUR health challenges? Do you think you have adrenal fatigue?

      Regards,

      Veronica

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    • Posted

      HI Veronica, Thanks for info, I will try to find the website.  I must admit that although I knew it wasn't the thyroid, or at least, not completely at fault, it was in the 1980s, I didn't have a computer, and even if I did, doubt it all the info available now would have been available then.  I suppose because my new GP, when I moved surgery, ridiculed the idea and nothing changed, I tended to become complacent, although dissatisfied. Even the books I read then, tended to just say that thyroxine was the treatment, so, I've only recently realised that the info is there. 
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    • Posted

      gosh that is an amazing set of resources from veronica!! tell us what you find out...will have a look too...

      i go to a high TSH if i skip thyroxin...but T3 and T4 stay within normal range.

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  • Posted

    Hi Marie, I've haven't heard of the term secondary hypothyroidism before.

    What is the disease that is giving you hypothyroidism?

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    • Posted

      Hi M, Not sure what the name is, I was never given a name, just the info that the pituitary wasn't working properly either.
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  • Posted

    thanks marie for this interesting discussion...am enjoying following.

    have others read Dr Kharrazian 'why do i still have symptoms when my blood tests are normal?'

    he warns us off cruciferous veg...ie raw broccoli, cabbage and kale...the very best things to eat!! but has since revised that opinion....since in the presence of iodine, selenium, zinc and iron (precursors of iron...such as from fluovite... a lovely herbal rich source of ingredients which help the body to produce her own iron)  problems with these veg are overcome.

    for the thyrotoxic however use of these veg is a device to bring down excess thyroxin!

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  • Posted

    source of info on supplementation:

    The Paleo Mom

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    • Posted

      Thanks, will look at that too, although I already have some Paleo cookbooks that I ordered before Xmas, my kitchen is not conducive to me really going the foodie way at the moment, but I'll be ready for when it is.
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    • Posted

      understood...really ...we have to be in a good place/space...i am however trying to move on with compliance to what my body needs.
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  • Posted

    One of the reasons I asked the question in the first place is that it is still considered to be a rare occurance for it to be caused by anything other than the thyroid gland itself in the UK.  I thought it would be good to see how many other people had another cause.
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    • Posted

      its been a really great initiative. the good thing about this site is that our posts hang around...if you add a bit from time to time eg your research results ...others will eventually find it and be very grateful to you xx
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