Should I have Partial Knee Replacement?

Posted , 6 users are following.

Hello, I've been reading "old" comments from patients who have had PKR, and it sounds as if there are lots of problems during recovery. I've had knee pain for several years, managing with injections, Advil, and physical therapy. My MRI shows torn meniscus and moderate arthritis, especially in the medial area. Doctor recommends PKR in the medial area, says recovery is much easier than TKR, there's a 95% success rate, and I should do it sooner rather than later. I am 76, healthy, physically active mostly walking. Right now I can manage the pain and continue to walk, but wonder if I should follow doctor's recommendation. I would appreciate any comments. Thank you.

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8 Replies

  • Posted

    I would do a total , was told by my first knee surgeon not to bother with a partial as will need doing again and not as successful . My second time different surgeon 7 years apart was going to do a partial but changed his mind because he could see slight arthritis in good area. First time was result of torn meniscus running . Research it but dont think that much difference in recovery and you certainly dont want to risk a redo

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  • Posted

    My humble opinion is don't do it !! I regret having mine done almost 17 months ago. Still suffering.

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  • Posted

    I should clarify; I meant don't do partial or total. If you're getting by with injections and OTC meds, no need to get such a traumatic surgery.

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  • Posted

    I am 72. It is two years since my TKR. I would not have this surgery again if they really offered me a million dollars. There is a tightnes in the leg that never went away. it was the worst surgery I’ve ever had in my whole life. I am happy for the people who have had it done successfully unfortunately I was not one of them. You never know how it’s going to come out but if I could do this over again I certainly would not. If you can walk and you can manage with the meds I would go that route. At our age I think it’s a lot better . Good luck with whatever you do

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    • Posted

      I had bilateral knee replacement in December 2018 and still have the tightness, so I spoke with a friend who had his bilateral knee replacement done three years ago. He told me that the tightness lasted him for at least two years, and then went away. He is now downhill skiing and doing great. I hope that your tightness will end soon, but wanted to share with you that there are others who experienced long lasting tightness that went away even after two years. I have been doing massage and suction cupping for mine and I do see a big difference recently.

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    • Posted

      My physiotherapist does it, he takes the suction cup and goes up and down my legs which pulls the ligaments away from the muscles, the opposite effect of massage. It is not painful, although uncomfortable at times because of the muscle tightness. I feel a lot of relief from it. I have had cupping done previously, but it was usually left in one place where this technique has the cup applied then moved to areas where issues are.

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  • Posted

    Hi Sandy - I have found through cancer treatment and knee surgery it's often only the bad things that get reported in blogs as people naturally seek reassurance and advice.

    I had a PKR last November and sailed through but every individual knee is different. Consultant said that due to my age PKR would be better because of the 'shelf-life' and it is easier to replace partial with a total if/when the time comes. You have to weigh the balance between not and doing - is it impeding your quality of life; could you wait longer, bearing in mind you may have to wait some time for an appointment? I also have a torn meniscus and arthritis so things were not going to get better (was down to bone on bone). I wouldn't say, 6 months on that I am about to try skipping but I no longer walk with a stick. I've been told it takes at least 18 months to fully recover. I get the odd twinge and swelling but all in all not too bad - get very tired too. I have had the luxury of not rushing recovery as I took early retirement; I have still not driven and please myself as to daily activities I feel like doing. I did the exercises pre and post surgery but not to any extreme. The new knee was ready to go the next day and I went home that evening. I had NHS surgery in UK and cannot fault the care. The spinal anesthesia was scary to think about but, in truth, amazing! The nerve block I was given kept me pain free from the outset. My other knee is deteriorating, which is frustrating as I feel it is holding me back in full recovery. When I saw my X-ray at 3 months check up, I was amazed at the difference before and after. I also look at my 97 year old Mum in law who had 2 hip replacements but decided against knee (10 years ago) as she felt she'd had enough. Her knee is now so bad her leg is bowed, painful and continuously swollen.

    I was told at pre -assessment to think that the pain I had then would get worse but the pain after surgery would/should get better.

    At 63 I thought it was worth it.

    Good luck with your decision.

    GG

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