Still Struggling..

Posted , 4 users are following.

Hi All,

so i recently posted on this forum about my swallowing issues. it all started when i had big bite of naan bread and choked on it. Since then i have had a laranscopy and a endoscopy which have found nothing.

is the fact that i cant swallow and when i do eat food sticks to my throat all in my head??

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  • Posted

    hi there i had this same problem and it has been going on for quite some time i had endoscopy landoscopy and a barium swallow wich all cqme back fine i was diagnosed with globus sensation have a read up about that chanches are its that and its all down to stress i am on medication for depression and antiphysocotic drugs for my bipolar dissorder but bottom line is i am now able to eat solid foods again hope this helps you.

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  • Posted

    Hi,

    I have been having difficulty with swallowing since March this year. Every time I eat I feel food stick in my chest and throat. I also had endoscopy and barrium swallow and they came back fine. My next test would be in Feb 2019. The next test I would suggest is manometry, where they stick a tube through your nose and to your esophogus to test your peristalsis and muscles. Manometry test is a gold standard for dysphagia and other motility issues. Don't let your doctor make you think it's all in your head.

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  • Posted

    I think a clue might be in 'big bite'. The more you swallow at any one time, before food has passed through into your stomach, the greater the pressure on your oesophagus, especially if the lower oesophageal sphincter, the valve by your diaphragm between your oesophagus and stomach, is not working as it should. Some food like bread can be particularly difficult.

    It is not unusual for an endoscopy finding to be 'normal', but there might be signs of food that has not passed through into your stomach. The next test might be a barium swallow test when you swallow a white liquid whilst being x-rayed.

    You could download 'A Patient's Guide to Achalasi' through Free Ebooks.

    It is unlikely to be 'all in your head', but it is true that tension and anxiety can make swallowing a bit more difficult because the muscles that control your swallowing work best when relaxed. Achalasia is a rare condition that involves the muscles not working because of problems with the nerve endings that send signals to the brain.

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