T3 testing by GP?

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I have been hypothyroid for 15 years with hashimotos . Endless issues with fluctuating levels and other problems such as low iron and vit d. I have recently asked my GP about T3 testing and she has referred me back to endocrinologist, however she said in refer real letter that she didn't think I needed to have T3 checked???? I have never had it checked before but wondered if anyone else had this done by GP or had this kind of response to request? Thanks

 

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  • Posted

    Hello...this is my first time to triple to any posts but I have used much of the advice. After 15 years of being hypo I seemed to get worse with joint pain and much fatigue. I finally begged my endocrinologist to test my t3. Results showed I needed help with it. She lowered my synthroid from 137 to 100 and added 5 Cytomel twice a day. I have been on this for4 months...have no joint pain...sleep all night...and can work a 10 hour day with no problems!!! Best of luck to you. Sounds like you're on the right path.
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    • Posted

      Thanks for your reply, sure that I wasn't only one who had been in this situation. Feel that gps think you are being hypochondriac, or have psych problems etc! One was quite offended when I asked her how much she knew about thyroid disease as she told me there was no link between low vit d and thyroid function. Hey ho, will keep plugging away. Do normally get sense from endocrinologist . I too have low energy, poor activity tolerance, joint pains, aching muscles. Will see how I get on,gps just make you feel you are being unreasonable when just want to feel well. 
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  • Posted

    I have had my hypothyroidsim controlled by being on a combination of 100mcgmsThyroxine(T4) and Lythyrinone10mcgms(T3) for the last 9 years.  I have kept relatively better on this than on T4 alone which I had for about 6-7 years at a dose of 150/175mcgms alternate days.  I felt pretty hyper on this level of medication but if I went down to a regular dose of 125mcgms each day I got fuzzy heads and headaches and generally functioned very poorly,. I had to see a consultant endocrinologist in order to get this change in medication and I am within the range for T4, T3 and TSH when tested biannually.  Hope that this helps.  I had to fight for the referral as my GP thought that I was just having psychiatric problems. 
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    • Posted

      I have also had issues with too much thyroxine then too little. I am feeling like not functioning 100%. Low energy, joint pains, generally feeling exhausted some days. Just get told I am depressed, well any wonder! Also struggling big time with weight and not able to lose any. GP s just treat you like all in your head! Thanks for reply. 
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  • Posted

    T3, T4, and TSH are the very basic quatities you need to know. Then move to reverse T3 and all of the other elements/minerals you need present in your body to make the T4 to T3 conversion. Those are Ferritin, Selenium, Zinc and others. 

    Rather than beg your doc/endo to do these obvious and essential measurements you might want to ask him/her why s/he thinks it is unneccessary that T3 not be measured. Do not accept the answer, "We can tell what's going on by your  T4 and TSH levels" because that is baloney! T4 is only the source material, what your body does with that material is more important. If you have low T3 you will have no energy and probably feel ill.

    The comments by patsy81229 and mvwaugh are right on and will probably help you. It might be a good idea to take these comments to your doctor because many of them are stuck in the old T4 only therepy and things are changing fast (meaning T3 added).

    Armour thyroid is another solution, it has T3 built in at a given ratio - while not being the human ratio it is far better and probably more accurate than hoping your doc/endo  gets the ratio right. That's the path I opted for, just recently actually, and I feel normal again after 2+ years of feeling like I would die within the next couple of months!

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    • Posted

      Thank you for that advice, yes that is a very good approach to go in with . Often you just feel fobbed off . I did wonder why my gp thought it didn't need testing, but she didn't say this to me when I saw her, only in referral letter. I will see what endocrinologist says next week, but I am completely with all of you, my understanding is that t4 converts to t3 which is used at a cellular level so although t4 levels may be ok , this says nothing about t3 and therefore what is actually happening in the tissues of the body. I have been told before that good ferritin levels are important for this process. Well it is all to do with the metabolism of certain chemicals so how they can say all these other minerals and nutrients are not relevant is beyond me. But will def take that approach, thank you. 
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  • Posted

    Hello Mumbolian:

    I have Hashimoto's disease and I am an RN.  My doctor always does T3  and I have had Hashi's since I was 27 and I am now 54!  TSH is not good to rely on, as you can have low T3 or T4 and not know it.  I can't convert T4 into T3 so I only take T3 (cytomel replacement med.)  It is recommended to do both T3 & T4 levels.

    The gland may or may not be converting T4 into T3 well, but unless you have the true test done - you will not know.  I think some doctors are doing just TSH for cost saving, and that is not good.

    I hope you get the T3 & T4 tested. Be well, Shelly

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  • Posted

    The code your doctor needs to put on the bottom of the NHS blood test form to get T3 tested is ETHY, though this doesn't always work.
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