thinking of indapamide

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hi ,is it possible to have some feed back on this drug.I am thinking of trying it starting at the lowest dose.I have been taking magnesium,grapeseed extract,calcium and vit c, and my pressures are averaging out at 155/75 I had such bad reaction to amlodapine that i decided to try alternative.Really i think i have been scared by doctors saying my bp to high.and also one doc told me magnesium can be dangerous in high doses..

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  • Posted

    Hi, I tried Indapamide as an alternative to Amlodipine, but had horrid headache and aches and pains. I looked up side effects on this site and decided not to take it as I get dyhydrated a lot, as have thyroid probs. Also worried about blood sugars and kidney problems and my father had gout which can also be a concern with diuretics.

    But some people dont have a problem so its really up to the individual. 

    I have found Turmerric has helped with my bp, also beetroot. Co enzyme q10, magnesium and vit c. 

     

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    • Posted

      When you sqay that "somthing has helped", was this result evaluated by laboartory blood or other fluid tests? Turmeric, beetroot, coenzyme-10, vit c and magnesium may be beneficial for otherwise healthy poeple but do not cure serious ailments. You need  a blood test for fasting glucose, creatinine (kidney functions), urea and electrolytes,

      uric acid (gout?) TSH (thyroid). Let a doctor prescribe these!

       

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  • Posted

    I'm no doctor. Because your pressure is high you need something. Be aware ..there are side effects with Amlodopine. If that happens ask for an alternative medicine Good luck
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    • Posted

      Everything can have a side effect, even water if excessively consumed. 

      Of course, you know this about alcohol.

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  • Posted

    It is disheartening that contributors try to rectify serious symptoms by buying and ingesting untested and unapproved so-called "NATURAL" stuff.

    I do not say that modern pharmacology is an unfailing and dead-accurate remedy, but for example, side effects of a well-known blood pressure medication like  amlopidine can be treated without snake oil-like remedikes. Amlopidine is a calcium channel; inhibitor and there are  several others, like tilazem (diltiazem), verapamil, nifepidine and  felodipine which can be used as an alternative. All require prescriptions.

    If you take  any of these, then discontinue all others taken before..

    Yes, 155/75 is an excessively high systolic reading, but there are numerous drugs that can be used effectively. Sometimes it requires some experimentation and it would be helpful if patients buy n inexpensive blood pressure testing instrument and learn how to use it. In this way,patients can assess  whether or not the prescribed medication has helped. I was always advocating that patients participate in their health care by working together with their doctor.

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    • Posted

      hi ian funny enough i have invested in a new blood pressure monitor, and my average readings are now 145/75 the lowest they have been in ages no meds,same diet,no extra exercise.my sleep is a damn site better i dont feel down ,no persistent cough,no swollen ankles.for the last five years i have listened to doctors and taken the meds lisinopril never brought my bp down to below the magic figure amlodapine made me ill so my view is something is going to kill me eventually and i would rather enjoy life until then.
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    • Posted

      Hi Nellybear,

      Love that sentiment: "...my view is something is going to kill me eventually and I would rather enjoy life until then." That's my motto too! It's got me well past my biblical three-score years and ten, and I plan to continue living by it.

      I'm not saying we should neglect our health - far from it. A healthy lifestyle is part of enjoying life. It's also useful to get occasional checks on things like BP, blood glucose, liver, kidney and thyroid function, bone density etc. to make sure we're on the right track. Yearly dental checks are indispensible, as dental decay, plaque and gum disease are serious contributors to cardiovascular problems. Regular eye examinations too: it would be almost criminal to go blind because of an easily-treated condition like glaucoma.

      That being said, I'm not prepared to live my life in thrall to the doctors. I'm happy to take the L-thyroxine my doctor prescribes for an under-active thyroid as it provides a clear benefit with no side-effects. It isn't a medication in the strict sense anyway, being a synthetic copy of a hormone my body doesn't make enough of.

      Periodically my doctor and I have a minor run-in over things he wants to prescribe which clearly (to me anyway) aren't necessary. For example, I've had GERD for 40 years but identified the triggers early on, and it's long since ceased to be a serious problem. These days I get literally two or three attacks per year, always during the night and my own fault due to late-night dietary indiscretions. I find a single dose of domperidone (Motilium) works immediately, but of course it's gone to prescription only these days all over Europe, due to occasional heart arrhythmias. When I recently asked my doctor if he would prescribe it, he immediately wanted to put me on omeprazole, which he said I'd have to take on a daily basis as it has no immediate effect on attacks of GERD. I gently pointed out the absurdity of taking a drug that isn't without side-effects every day to deal with a problem that only occurs twice a year, and he eventually gave in gracefully - but only after reiterating that omeprazole is the drug of choice for GERD.

      On other occasions I've quietly accepted prescriptions to keep him happy, but not had them filled. This happened on a spring day when I was suffering from my usual short-lived tree pollen allergy and inadvertently produced a single asthmatic cough during the consultation. He immediately prescribed a steroid inhaler without even asking me about the cough! I smiled and thanked him, but never got the inhaler. He's a good sort and I know I sometimes give him a hard time, so I try to be kind to him when I can.

      Doctors can sometimes infantilise their patients. This isn't because of any evil plan on the part of doctors, but because the majority of patients seem to want to surrender full responsibility for their health to the medical profession, so they assume we're all the same. And there's nothing wrong in surrendering all responsibility to your doctor if that's what you want. Equally, don't be afraid to approach your doctor from a position of equality if you want more of a say in your treatment. He may be the expert but it's your body!

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    • Posted

      Lily, wise to avoid Omeprazole in case you are one of the patients like me who reacts badly to it.  Have you tried daily 'live' yoghurt to help keep the GERD at bay - apart from your late night dietary indiscretions, of course!  Long-term PPIs can also put you at risk of thinning of the bones (osteoporosis).  Stay healthy.
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    • Posted

      I sometimes eat live yoghourt, and have tried intensive courses of it over the years for various symptoms. Apart from anything else, it normally tastes better than the other stuff. Fortunately I can keep the GERD under control by eating very little bread - and none at all after 2pm - and avoiding excessively fatty or acidic foods (and especially combinations of the two) in the evening.

      Sometimes the simplest measures can help too. I think the biggest discovery I ever made was that raising the head of my mattress slightly and sleeping with an extra pillow slashed my night-time attacks by half. I find avoiding constipation helps - fortunately no longer a problem since I started taking magnesium for high BP 15 years ago! - and I discovered that not wearing tight trousers made a big difference. This, together with the effect of constipation, is borne out by more recent theories that it's gas being pushed up from the intestines that forces the sphincter open. I always kind of knew this, even before the idea became fashionable.

      With you all the way on the osteoporosis thing. I don't need anything that's going to make that worse. I get two-yearly bone density scans, which have been showing osteopaenia from the moment I started getting them - after the menopause at 45. My mother, grandmother and great-aunts all had the same problem. My bone density goes up as well as down over the years, sometimes approaching normal levels, but I've so far never gone into full-scale osteoporosis. Nor do I plan to! I manage it with weight-bearing exercise, supplements of calcium, magnesium, vit D3, vit K2 and a homeopathic preparation of the BMP2 and BMP4 genes.

      There's a lot we can do for all manner of chronic conditions by making use of diagnostic tests then applying a little science for ourselves, without always resorting to medication.

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    • Posted

      Hi, we have been taking Kefir and it has helped with GERD also ACV ( good quality) watered down a little with apple juice.

      We dont eat after 7pm and have been sleeping much better.

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  • Posted

    Hi nellybearm my experience with Indapamide was not good.  Within just 3 weeks, it caused debilitating weakness and subsequent blood tests revealed raised creatinine, reduced sodium levels and reduced estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR). Having lived healthily with just one kidney for 60 years, the latter side effect was certainly not welcome!

    Of course, it doesn't mean to say that because I had such a bad experience with Indapamide that you will do the same - we are all different and will react differently to both illness and the medications prescribed to treat them.

    You don't say how old you are but a blood pressure reading of 155/75 if you are of the older generation is really not excessively high.  The Stroke Association's guidelines state

    "The ideal blood pressure for an adult is about 120/80, and that blood pressure slightly lowr than this is regarded as a sign of good health and is not treated with drugs.  Doctors aim to reduce the upper (systolic) figure of you blood pressure to below 160 and the lower (diastolic) figure to below 90.  Even if this is not achievable, small reductions can significantly reduce your risk of heart disease or stroke."

    So from the above it can be seen that your diastolic reading is within the normal range even though your systolic figure is a little raised.

    My consultant has said he would like to see my blood pressure below 140/80, but unfortunately so far there is only one BP medication (Losartan Potassium) that I can definitely say doesn't cause me any discernible side effects, BUT neither does it reduce my high BP!  I am still wading through the various pills searching for one that both works and doesn't cause me debilitating side effects.  The latest pill (Doxazosin) is causing shortness of breath when walking and muscle pain.  Amlodipine was the very first pill I was prescribed - a definite no-no for me with unbearable side effects.

    It's true what your Dr says about magnesium being dangerous in high doses - a magnesium blood test will reveal whether or not you are deficient and whether you need a supplement.  In the case of calcium, too, again you should have your calcium levels checked by way of a blood test as it is possible to become hypercalcaemic if your body makes too much calcium.  Vit C is relatively harmless as our bodies will throw out what we don't need.  Most of us do need Vit D.

    So the bottom line is get those blood tests done and only take the supplements that you need.  Don't add any salt to your food, drink plenty of water and have plenty of exercise - walking is great.  And if you do need BP medication, start with a very low dose at first, gradually titrating the dose up if side effects allow.  Good luck.    

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  • Posted

    If you are taking Losartan (50 mg) and have no adverse side effects, I would recommend  Rawamil SR 240 as an adjuvant. I have been quite successful with this combination. I also monitor my BP at night and use 5 mg Doxazosin to keep my BP even throughout the night, until about 10AM when I take the above mentioned two drugs. Cardiologists say that at advanced age (seventies)  a systolic BP of 140 is tolerable, in fact I was told that if it is 140, then I should not atke anything!
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