Tingling feet, crawling skin

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Had tingling in my feet the past couple of days, crawling under the skin of my feet like there's ants there ! Restless legs, ache in a different place every day. Just generally feel off. I think it's safe to say I'm fully in peri. Started taking B6 today, at Jay's suggestion, so will report back on the results in a week or so. Also taking zinc in an effort to halt recurring thrush, which so far seems to be working. Jay said B12 is also good so might try that as well. Supplements are expensive though so don't want to buy too many. Hope all you ladies are coping well with your symptoms xx

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  • Posted

    Hi Lara

    i too use to get crawly skin in peri.. from time to time.. it is a peri symptom..

    horrible isnt it... 

    good luck with B6 😀

    Jayxx

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  • Posted

    Tingling YEP count me in and fingers, boobs....I posted last week about vitamin D deficiancy might be worth a look into.

    Also Kelp helps.

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  • Posted

    useful info 

    While most women are familiar with the common menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes, many are unaware of menopausal effects on the skin.

    Itchy skin is experience by many women during the menopausal transition.

    Skin problems during menopause are closely linked with hormonal changes characteristic of this natural period of change.

    Skin changes can begin as early as perimenopause, or the time leading up to the cessation of menstrual periods, which can range from three to ten years.

    Other women may experience skin changes after menopause. 

    Women who begin to experience dry or itchy skin during menopause are smart to take the time to learn more about this symptom, its causes, and its treatment.

     

    Itchy Skin During Menopause?

    Menopause can often trigger skin changes leading to itchy skin. Itchy skin, medically known as pruritis, can be a major life disruption, especially if it causes significant discomfort and/ or disrupts sleep.

    Related to pruritis, paresthesia can also afflict women during the menopausal transition. An abnormal skin condition affecting touch sensation, paresthesia is defined as sensations of numbness, "pins and needles", tingling, and/or pricking of the skin.

    A small percentage of menopausal women report itchy skin symptoms of formication, a specific type of paresthesia, characterized by creepy, crawling sensations on the skin. People with formication have the phantom sensation of ants or other insects crawling on their skin.

     

    What Causes Itchy Skin During Menopause?

    Hormonal Causes

    During menopause, the most common underlying cause of itchy skin is hormonal change. As the body prepares for the cessation of menstruation and egg development during perimenopause, levels of estrogen in the body also fluctuate and eventually begin a steady decline.

    Estrogen plays an important role in maintaining healthy skin. For example, estrogen is responsible for stimulating the production of skin collagen, a fibrous protein that provides strength, resilience, and support to the skin and other tissues.

    As estrogen production diminishes around the time of menopause, dry itchy skin becomes a very common symptom. The decline in skin thickness and collagen production appears to be most rapid in the years immediately proceeding menopause.

    Lowered estrogen levels also decrease the body's ability to retain moisture and slow down the body's production of natural skin oils, which also contributes to itchy skin.

     

    Other Rare Causes of Itchy Skin

    While hormonal changes are the most common cause of itchy skin around the time of menopause, other medical conditions can be responsible for itchy skin. While these are rare causes, they are important to be aware of, particularly in cases where itchy skin is accompanied by other unexplained symptoms.

    Women concerned about the causes of itchy skin and those who experience other worrisome symptoms are advised to speak with a qualified dermatologist or other medical professional. Fortunately, itchy skin in menopause can often be successfully managed with self care and natural treatments.

     

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    • Posted

      You've came up with a lot of good information again tonight Jay,dr did ask if itchy or crawly ,but mines been itchy ,my girl gets this again just her arms like me.mine began just before I was 48. So yes all the time line fits in.will sit tomorrow and have another re- read .

       I'm amazed at what you find out on all subjects ,how do you know where to begin.Thanks again Jayxxx

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    • Posted

      No Astrid it's not soap allergy ,went down that route,it's menopausal symptom ,I can go for a bit ,then back there again . Don't rinse in fabric softener  just plain water .Summer time wear nothing on my arms ,still get this itching .dont last for long just annoying ,thanks for that suggestion  xx
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    • Posted

      I know you write this a year ago but I have been experiencing all that on menopause I do take a low dose hrt but experiencing pins like pricking itching so Thankyou has reassured me as I was thinking MS
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    • Posted

      Does it feel like  something running through scalp and on your legs and a stinging feeling? That's been my experience. It is most miserable

       

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  • Posted

    I wanted to point out that there is a condition called restless legs sydrome that is common in menopausal and other women.  This can be caused by low iron levels in the body, common with women in the menopause who bleed heavy.  It is dangerous to just take iron without need so I would always visit my GP to confirm that this is not or is the problem prior to treating this.  Are your legs restless at night more... If so this might suggest that this is the problem.  This problem will also make you feel generally not well and lethargic.  Might be worth getting a blood test to rule this out.
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    • Posted

      My husband gets restless legs bad of an evening,even when he's in bed to the point he has to get up ,told him it was iron when I read up on it,women in pregnancy get it hence why women are put on iron tabs in pregnancy,well most are ,I was with my first ,but fine with my second. 

       These damn hormones figure in lots of conditions .

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    • Posted

      Hi Marlene,  If you can get your husband to the docs for a blood test.  It is really dangerous to self dose with iron.   He can definately be given other medications for restless legs too.  Awful condition.  My friend suffers from this terrible and has a lot of sleepless nights.  Not too good if you share a bed with someone with it either. 
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    • Posted

      He's an asthmatic ,so always careful on anything he takes ,always a chemist does checks ,as we use the same chemist ,so we don't worry ,even winter cough meds he can only take just one brand,he's good he will get up if after half hour it's still the same,so he's considerate.we both got tinnitus so understand that condition together ,if mines high I can lay in bed and meditate,where he can't.All these conditions everyone has these days,must get him to tell his dr about this restless leg again,he comes back Oh I forgot to tell him .Again MEN ,us women would jump on it to tell a dr.
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  • Posted

    hello lara, my feel tingle 24/7 and tingle so much sometimes they hurt.  I also have freezing hands and feet.  I can't say i suffer from restless leg but when i cant sleep my legs do ache but i can't complain.  I really don't know the answer to it except when i mentioned it to my Dr she said wanted to do a blood test to see if i was low in any vitamins, turned out i'm low in vit D.  I've only just started taking the vit D she subcribed on Thursday so early days yet, i dont know if i'll feel any better but i will let you know, I'm on them for 3 months so we'll see.  take care, sending you a tingly hug x
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  • Posted

    Hi ladies. I've just noticed that some of you were kind enough to respond to my post but I missed it and didn't get back to you, sorry. It's hard to keep track of all the discussions sometimes. Chrisy, you asked about restless legs and yes, sometimes at night, I wake feelling like I could run a mile ! Funny you should mention iron. I had a blood test recently, checking thyroid and hormone levels amongst other things, but the only thing that was low was iron. I'm now on iron tablets, which are vile, but I have to take them for 3 months then have another blood test.
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