tingling & numbness in middle finger

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My fingers while playing WOW (I'm 59)  two days ago kept getting numb and I would move the finds and hands to get it better, my computer sits on hospital table like that slide to your bed I use it in living room where my mac sits on anyways it's higher than my hand can reach and my wrist rest on it but been doing taht for almost a year now no problem. But now my middle finger and the palm of my hand under it feels ike a shot of novacain just before it wears off feels tight, fat and numb it hasnt cleared up been like this now for 2 to 3 days. I'm scared it's anything from ALS to leporsy so internet says has me VERY worried and afraid. Anyone have the numbness feeling stay without clearing up for days?I am in bad panic :-(

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  • Posted

    It is FAR more likely to be a condition called carpal tunnel syndrome. This is a response on a medical site to a question from someone with similar symptoms to you (I'm assuming it is only one hand?):

    "Sorry to hear you have this problem, but it's very unlikely to be anything to do with your circulation, as it is so well localised to your right hand.

    Another thing people worry about with these sort of symptoms is a stroke, but I think that too is very unlikely.

    With the symptom of numbness as well as tingling it sounds much more as if this is a nerve entrapment.

    That means that somewhere along the line of the nerves that supply this part of your hand, there is some pressure on a nerve.

    There are two likely places:

    The neck is a possibility because the nerves that go to your hand exit the spine in the neck and travel down the arm into the fingers.

    A bit of wear and tear, or even a bit if a twist to the ligaments here could cause pressure on the nerves that would then be felt as tingling and numbness in the fingers.

    The other likely possibility is pressure in the wrist. The nerves to the fingers go through a small tunnel at the wrist to get into the hand – called the carpal tunnel.

    Pressure here will produce similar symptoms.

    Usually it is the middle fingers that are most affected. It can be worse at night and cause pain or discomfort that may wake you, or the hand may feel particularly numb and heavy first thing in the morning.

    This condition is called carpal tunnel syndrome."

    Don't panic and don't google symptoms! You will always only find the really nasty things - which are really very rare! Do mention it to your doctor.

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    • Posted

      PS, you can have carpal tunnel syndrome in both hands.
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  • Posted

    You may not be aware that there are H & S regulations for use of computers to avoid these specific injuries. It seems clear from your description that the computer is not properly aligned with hands and eyes so you should google DSE regulations but the gist is listed here:

    The following may help users:

    ¦

    Forearms should be approximately horizontal and the user’s eyes should be the

    same height as the top of the screen.

    ¦

    Make sure there is enough work space to accommodate all documents or

    other equipment. A document holder may help avoid awkward neck and eye

    movements.

    ¦

    Arrange the desk and screen to avoid glare, or bright reflections. This is often

    easiest if the screen is not

    directly facing windows or bright lights.

    Health and Safety

    Working with display screen equipment (DSE)

    Page 3 of 6

    ¦

    Adjust curtains or blinds to prevent intrusive light.

    ¦

    Make sure there is space under the desk to move legs.

    ¦

    Avoid excess pressure from the edge of seats on the backs of legs and knees.

    A footrest may be helpful, particularly for smaller users.

    Well-designed workstations

    Keyboards and keying in (typing)

    ¦

    A space in front of the keyboard can help you rest your hands and wrists when

    not keying.

    ¦

    Try to keep wrists straight when keying.

    ¦

    Good keyboard technique is important – you can do this by keeping a soft

    touch on the keys

    and not overstretching the fingers.

    Using a mouse

    ¦

    Position the mouse within easy reach, so it can be used with a straight wrist.

    ¦

    Sit upright and close to the desk to reduce working with the mouse arm stretched.

    ¦

    Move the keyboard out of the way if it is not being used.

    ¦

    Support the forearm on the desk,

    and don’t grip the mouse too tightly.

    ¦

    Rest fingers lightly on the buttons and do not press them hard.

    Reading the screen

    ¦

    Make sure individual characters on the screen are sharp, in focus and don’t

    flicker or move. If they do, the

    DSE may need servicing or adjustment.

    ¦

    Adjust the brightness and contrast controls on the screen to suit lighting

    conditions in the room.

    ¦

    Make sure the screen surface is clean.

    ¦

    When setting up software, choose text that is large enough to read easily on

    screen when sitting in a normal comfortable working position.

    ¦

    Select colours that are easy on the eye (avoid red text on a blue background

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    • Posted

      Hi Steven,

      Some good points in the H&S.

      You might want to add this very small but handy utility to stop 'Blue Cold Light' wrecking your eyesight. I recommend it highly to many people I know.

      It is not the brightness and contrast that can damage your eyes. The cold "Blue Light" emitting from our HDMI screens is also a bad problem.

      My monitor "Blue Light" outputs at 4,500k in the daytime (this is plenty to view normally), the default on all screens is 6,500k which is far too high for anyone to withstand day-in & day-out.

      Ideally, in artificial light you should not be even viewing your monitor or even mobile phones, with "Blue-light" which can seriously damage your eyesight, I have over the years.

      So, at this time of day my monitor switches to warm "Orange Light" - which causes no red eye, the temperature on mine now, is just 3,700k. Much easier on the eyes!

      The only part of your screen that stays with "cold blue light" is the mouse pointer but nothing else.

      Google:  flux software

      It will show up at the top of the results, its available for most platforms. Once you install flux you can adjust the colour temperatures to suit yourself.

      Regards,

      Les.

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    • Posted

      Thanks les you are right but I did not want to go through the whole list of DSE tests and really the brightness is only applicable for those people who spend all day at the screens without sufficient breaks. H & S can get a little too involved but the DSE standards were brought in many years ago due to rsi and not updated to my knowledge

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  • Posted

    Hi,

    You may find this could be a Folic Acid deficiency.

    I have numbness and a "pins and needles" effecting both hands and fingers, since I been taking Folic Acid tablets which you can get on the NHS, the numbness, is going but it takes time.

    I have severe nerve conditions as well, but I was told it is where I don't eat enough greens or certain fruit. Bananas is a fruit that should help, well I can say that is wrong, because I have a banana everyday! So, that didn't work.

    At the other end of the scale you have "Coeliac Disease" - this can cause the same symptoms that you describe.

    EileenH, stated it could be "Carpal Tunnel Syndrome" this is also possible, but I personally would ask your Doctor for blood tests to be done, first. This would rule out Folic Acid deficiency and Coeliac Disease.

    Regards,

    Les.

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    • Posted

      thanks for replies, I looked up Coeliac Disease but didnt see anything about numbness in finger and or "pins and needles"  Is there a difference in "feeling like numbness" or "actual numb" ? My middle finger feels like numbness, fat swollen feeling (but doesnt look swollen) and stiff combo. I do get the needles and pins feeling on both hands and tips and at night my hands fall asleep and get so numb I have to shake the heck out of them and work my fingers up and down. BUT this middle finger has been lingering with the numbness, fat swollen feeling for a couple of days now. I pulled at the base of the middle finger yesterday and it made a loud pop. I think it's not as numb and fat feeling as it was BUT still not gone like maybe 20% better but still has the numb and fat feeling. Has anyones numbness and swollen feeling stay for like days and nights soild and for a while?

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    • Posted

      I have to say - coeliac disease being the cause of numb fingers as the presenting complaint is a VERY big step! 

      More typical symptoms would be: 

      Diarrhoea, excessive wind and/or constipation.

      Persistent or unexplained gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea and vomiting.

      Regular stomach pain, cramping or bloating.

      Iron, vitamin B12 or folic acid deficiency.

      Tiredness and/or headaches.

      Weight loss (in some cases)

      The others would be likely to appear long before the folic acid deficiency!

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    • Posted

      I confused Elleen are u saying it cannot be coeliac disease or folic acid deficiencey?
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    • Posted

      The reply was to Les really about his suggestion you might have coeliac disease! I didn't say anything about what it "cannot" be  - but coeliac disease would be a LONG way down the list.

      I suggest you go to your GP and tell them about the numb fingers. Let them do an examination and tests and decide what it could be.

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    • Posted

      Hi Eileen,

      I didn't mean that is what he had, but it is associated with that disorder.

      You can't tell what a person suffers from online, I shouldn't have gone that far down the line.

      A lot more people these days have Vitamin B12 or folic acid deficiency. But this is down to their bad diets.

      Best advice is go to your doctor - if they can't help they can refer you for tests, but personally I would think the first stop would be blood tests.

      Regards,

      Les.

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