Too young?

Posted , 10 users are following.

I had a arthroscopy recently and saw my surgeon on Friday. He said my kneecap is down to bone on bone but said I couldn't have a replacement as I'm too young, I'm 53. It's more painful since the surgery. What should I do? Any suggestions?

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11 Replies

  • Posted

    I had an arthroscopy when I was 42. My knee was bone on bone. Wouldn't do a full replacement and didn't really want to do a partial at that age either.

    However in January I went ahead and had a partial replacement (patella femoral). I am 46. Have to say at the moment I'm not feeling much benefit but told it's still early days!

    I'm sure at 52 you could have the full replacement. My surgeon said he would do it at 50. Good luck!

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  • Posted

    Hi I had a half knee replacement done when I was 50 through no fault of my own. With seeing different doctors right name but wrong date of birth. Till I seen my own consultant who noticed the mix up. Had keyhole surgery but half my Cartwright crumb led so only thing was half knee replacement. Which was one year's ago. Has a full knee replacement on my other knee 31st Jan this year. I'm 59. Good luck hope u get sorted soon.xx

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  • Posted

    Hi Debbiermn, My understanding of 'being too young' is that knee joints only last about 10-15 years. So if you were to have one done fairly early in life it wouldn't last too long. They can only do 2 replacements on your knee in a lifetime.So they like you to be older. Having said that I had my knee totally replaced at 55. Was scheduled to have the other one replaced at 61. Ended up with septic arthritis 1 day prior to having surgery.I decided to have stem cell treatment instead. I am in Australia. For me it's the best thing I could have done. Good luck.I would see another doctor. Cheers.

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  • Posted

    I reiterate what many others have already posted - definitely get a second opinion! So past experience says replacements only last 10-15 years but there is progress all the time. In 10 years' time there will probably be other options. Good luck

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  • Posted

    Thank you for all your advise.  I'm not sure it is too easy to get a second opinion on the NHS, I didn't choose my surgeon in the first place - you tend to get who you're given!

    I will go back to m GP and see what he says.

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    • Posted

      You are entitled to see who you want to see and where but you need to be stubborn and a have a helpful GP,

      Google The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital for the best. They have two centres.

       

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    • Posted

      My cousin had an ankle replacement when she was about fifty.  She was in a wheelchair by then.  The replacement is still fine, although she was told it might only last 10 or 15 years.  As she is now in her late sixties she's done well.  And she says they have indeed worked out new ways to deal with the problem of the replacement wearing out, as she gambled they would, although she doesn't yet need this.  If your replacement happens today, and you live a life which minimizes overuse of the new joint, you may be 65, or older, before you need any additional treatment.  In the meantime, by being left untreated, the way you have to hold your body will be placing extra stress on joints which currently are not in trouble.  Good luck.  Please let us know how you get on - we are rooting for you!  

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  • Posted

    Hi Debbie I am 49 and am hoping to have a total knee replacement in the next few months- I have been struggling with osteoarthritis of my knee for 3 years but really the last 6 months have been hell. 3 years ago I was told too that I was very young for surgery and I struggled on but now its intolerable and impacting my life and that of my family. I recently went back to him and explained the level of pain I have and that  this is not just about the pain, the disease  is  eroding little pieces of me away with it and i am not me anymore. He has agreed to progress this and 2 weeks ago they aspirated my knee to see if there was any fluid, the purpose of this was to see if they could grow any bugs from this fluid and see if I have any lingering infrection etc. no fluid but procedure was v painful and i spent a week recovering as they stuck needles under my knee cap. yuck. when i explaind to my Doctor the level of pain I had when it flared up he said pain was the best reason to have surgery. If i were you I would keep a pain diary and go back again to him with more details. Take control yourself. Remember there is more than 1 surgeon around, the way i feel is that i want to live my life now, if there are more issues in 20 years time I'll deal with them then. Good luck

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