total knee replacement

Posted , 7 users are following.

I injured my right knee playing football in 1966, and again in1967, had the cartilages removed in 1967, still continued to play football, and had more surgery in 1984, put off having a TKR until November 2018, and now 6 months later am not sure if it was a good move, as I still cannot bend it past the 90degrees, so have problems going down stairs, and walking down a steep hill, and riding a bike, and doing those exercises which require knee flexion. I do all exercises that the PT/Physio advises, swim every day, go to the Gym everyday, have a walk and do stairs every day, but the knee just wont bend, it is so frustrating, and that's not including the pain and suffering, the sleepless nights, of those early few weeks, and reading a few blogs from fellow TKR sufferers feel that Surgeons that do these operations over estimate their success rate

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  • Posted

    Played hockey for 45 years...yup, it catches up to you sooner or later...

    Here are two links for you to check out...

    ROM Work at Home

    Exercising

    However, I don't understand how you got out of PT at 12 weeks post op with only a 90-degree ROM when the goal is 120? You are absolutely correct that you need the minimum ROM to do stairs. So...you have to get to 120. Did PT tell you that 90 was as good as it could ever get? That would be very unusual. People who cannot achieve somewhere around the 0 / +120 mark often go back to their surgeon for an MUA. Doc opens you back up, removes scar tissue and manually manipulates the knee so you can meet the minimum standard. Have to talked to your doc about this? Having only a 90-degree flexion will definitely affect your life...and not for the better.

    As far as "success rates" are concerned, no doc can predict how easy or difficult your particular TKR will be. Even the majority of people who have both knees done report a completely different experience with #2 vs. #1...for better or worse. No predictions available. And how much scar tissue your body generates vs. other people has a lot to do with your DNA and not the doc or the procedure. Again...no one can tell in advance...it's always a crapshoot. IF PT cannot break that scar tissue down, I'd suggest discussing this with your surgeon. Doing nothing is not an option...

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    • Posted

      Chico, never heard of a Dr. opening anyone up for a MUA. I had one with my first knee 2+ years ago. Took 15 min & all he did was force the bend, busting up scar tissue and then my ROM was achieved!

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    • Posted

      You are correct. I thought I read of people where the doc actually went in but the actual procedure is where they know you out and then bend you in all sorts of ways to break that scar tissue down. People on the forum who have had it done report a lot of success. Thanks for the correction...

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    • Posted

      Chico, I'm on a cane only in less than a week still painful when i get up from sitting or lying down but miraculous so far the ice water machine (ARCTIC ICE) has been a tremendous help to me swelling down and pain managed by hydrocodone! What a difference

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    • Posted

      I had an ice machine too. Used it continuously when I was in bed or on the couch. The main cylinder held two plastic packs while we had another two re-freezing. My wife would just swap them when necessary. The ice plus Voltaren Gel (after the incision healed) helped a lot.

      I tossed my walker after a few days and went right to the cane. Very used to it after four knee scopes. The big one was going to the supermarket and NOT using the electric scooters to shop. I forced myself as much as possible but still aware of the "balloon knee" I had at 5 weeks after doing 8,200+ steps. Learned that lesson but challenged myself when I could. After the muscle rebuild, I was going up stairs two at a time without holding onto anything at 14 months.

      Gotta get strong again...just takes time, determination and patience. Use the cane as long as you need to...and be careful walking on grass. You cannot see divots and uneven patches. Your balance needs to come back first or you'll fall over...I know I did. Just be careful.

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  • Posted

    Hi, I had a TKR in September 2017 and always had problems with flexion to start with. I would torture myself on a daily basis to get that flexion but any gain i achieved during the day disappeared overnight which i thought was strange. Now im further down the line i can tell you that i had an infection in the joint which was missed by the surgeon and i was just made to believe that what i was experiencing was normal recovery. The infection caused my implant to become loose so ive recently had a first stage revision with dynamic spacer. When the surgeon went in he found a cavity which was left by the infection and a lot of scar tissue which he cut away. He said he managed to get my flexion to 120 when he had finished his master piece. So im back in the recovery stage and 3 weeks post op today and I already have a flexion of 90 degrees. Chico has kindly shared his exercise programme to improve ROM which I will follow. During my first recovery if you are in the UK the physios seem to be happy with a flexion of 90 degrees but that isnt good enough if you want to ride a bike. Good luck with your flexion x

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    • Posted

      Hi, have got Chico's exercise program, and will incorporate into my exercise regime, I saw my Op Surgeon last week, and he didn't seem concerned, said knee looks good, though I still have some swelling, and I should get some more flexion, but as I had reduced flexion prior to op I'm not going to get much more post op. I will see him again in a few months with up to date Xrays. Hope your 2nd op is more successful, and you avoid infection, and good luck with your flexion and recovery

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  • Posted

    Six months after my TKR, I can't straighten the leg, it has a 15 - 20° bend. However, straight after the operation I could achieve a 90° + bend. Unfortunately, it has only been in the last couple of weeks that I have managed to walk with a Walker and then only a few yards at a time. I agree that surgeons have a high degree of optimism in their procedures which, for some 20% of their patients, is not realised within the expected timeframe.

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  • Posted

    Six months after my TKR, I can't straighten the leg, it has a 15 - 20° bend. However, straight after the operation I could achieve a 90° + bend. Unfortunately, it has only been in the last couple of weeks that I have managed to walk with a Walker and then only a few yards at a time. I agree that surgeons have a high degree of optimism in their procedures which, for some 20% of their patients, is not realised within the expected timeframe.

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