Trip to A&E

Edited , 7 users are following.

I ended up in A&E yesterday afternoon. I had extremely bad stomach burning. This had nothing to do with my resection. They did my bloods and a CT scan--all normal for someone 18 days post-op. What I do know is sweet anything, dairy higher in fat and certain carbonated drinks do me in. My surgeon told me to try mixing in foods with no raw veggies. My dumb arse had sushi, or rather sashimi. For a night cap I had a chocolate chip cookie with a small glass of ice cold skin milk. BAD IDEA!!! I do believe my stomach isn't at all ready for that yet. I've had moderate success with canned cooked green beans. My fiance had Chinese two days ago and I had a one small broccoli floret. Again, how dumb am I lπŸ˜†? Very. So, long story short I've been told I'm walking too much, and basically overdoing it. Currently i have a fentanyl 25 mgh patch . This certainly helps with my incisional pain. Hope you lot are all doing wellπŸ‘πŸ».

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  • Edited

    I'm sorry, chalk it up to lesson learned. Even after almost 2 years I stay away from fresh vegetables (except lettuce), especially if they're hard. I've barely been able to eat broccoli and cauliflower, and minimally. Last week I ate cabbage, BIG MISTAKE, was sick for at least 5 days, and it was just a little bit. Because of the limits of diet I make sure to take multivitamin. My surgeon told me to never eat more than the size of my fist, and always keep in mind that what goes in must come out. I've personally learned that gassy vegetables, greasy, spicy foods do not go well with diverticulitis.

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    • Posted

      Re. eating fresh veggies, what about pulverizing them into a veggie drink so that they're totally liquid. I ask this because we're all aware of the importance of fresh fruits and veggies in our diets.

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  • Edited

    I also stayed on the soft food, bland diet for at least 8 weeks. You need to basically reach your stomach how to digest. Also the antibiotics tear up your stomach lining. Patience is your friend.

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  • Posted

    I am so sorry you are having so much trouble. Hope things improve drastically - and soon! I lived on homemade chcken/vegetable soup, scrambled eggs, rice chex, turkey sandwiches, mashed potatoes, air-fried chicken and salmon for quite some time. I also found one of the worst things was overeating. I am 3 months out, now, and can eat most anything - minus deep fried and spicy foods. I still struggle some with irregularity, but that comes a lot from my ibs, too. Hang in there!!

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  • Posted

    I didn't get advised to eat/ not eat anything and i think I'm paying for it.

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  • Edited

    I feel as if the colorectal cancer community, and GI surgeons spray this false notion patients post-op will be golden in 6 weeks time. I rarely see a person on here posting uber positive surgery stories. I've talked to many resection patients in the last 6 months, and they all say the same thing...this surgery's recovery is 1 year at minimum. I'm more than 2 weeks post op and my pain in the afternoons is significant. But, still...I'm happy I had the surgery. Hopefully it'll all be worth itπŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ».

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    • Posted

      Thanks for posting this from the perspective of someone who's had the operation. So many people seem to go into the surgery with the golden glow that this is the be all and end all, and will fix all their problems like the press of the button. I have long advocated people to think very hard first before having elective surgery, unless of course it is absolutely essential, and there is no choice.

      In the past couple of years I have seen 2 friends both have surgery (for other conditions). One was told she would would have "some pain but back to normal in 2 weeks". After 2 weeks she was still in hospital on heavy pain killers, 2 MONTHS later, 20 pounds lighter, she was just starting to eat again and not needing to return to bed after a few hours. Similarly for the other friend who has now been told 6-12 months recovery time. Recovery from major surgery DOES take time, and varies person to person. PLEASE have realistic expectations when deciding to have elective surgery.

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    • Edited

      Thank u for ur common sense perspective. I'm perplexed by what seems to be a different approach in the U.S. versus the rest of the world. In the U.S., doctors seems to advocate surgery first, whereas in other countries, surgery is only recommended when bleeding or other life-threatening conditions are present. Do I have that right?

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    • Posted

      As an Ex pat living in America I can absolutely tell you why the rest of the world holds off on surgery...its because most healthcare has a budget as you lot well know. The NHS is skint. Doesn't matter what your ailment is to be honest...the result is always the same, "Do nothing unless its absolutely needed." I don't at all fancy the American healthcare costs, but I will say the care here is 2nd to none. If you have a microperforation as I did with my 1st diverticulitis attack there's an 80% chance you'll have others in close proximity to your first attack. To be very honest I'd advise anyone who falls into this category to book surgery asap. YOU WILL HAVE OTHER ATTACKS. The pain becomes a chronic daily nightmare. I was on Augmentin for two months between 2nd hospitalized and surgery. Lucky for me it kept me out of hospital until my surgery date. I wish someone on here wouldve posted this when I joined the community b/c I would've booked my surgery 3 months ago instead of messing around with pain and unneeded trips to A&E.

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    • Posted

      I will have to say, I did not go into my surgery (which was elective after almost 6 months of on/off (mostly on) again attacks of diver. I was on meds when I had surgery, but it did not pose a problem as it was somewhat controlled. I was very hesitant, but VERY tired of never feeling good and of eating just soup and turkey sandwiches! I came out of the surgery very thankful that I had it. My recovery was almost painless (no pain pills but tylenol) and within one week I was totally taking care of myself (and my dog), driving, cooking, etc., and by four weeks, pretty much eating whatever. I still stay away from spicy or fried foods and tomato based dishes. There is no way to describe how much better I feel. Three months out, and I am back to normal - or better. Working, eating, and loving life. Don't regret not having surgery earlier b/c I had to be sure it couldn't be taken care of in any other way. But so glad I didnt delay any longer! I'm 76, and I want to enjoy every day I have left of my life. I thank God every morning that I can get up and enjoy the day. So many times, on forums like this we hear mainly the bad b/c the good results people just go on and forget about it. I wanted to let people know the good side. Praying for all of you who are still suffering.

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    • Posted

      Thanks for your input. So many mixed messages. Some report vast improvement in health and quality of life; others say long. complicated recovery. I'd love to hear more from folks who've had the surgery, how they're doing after a year or so, etc.

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    • Posted

      As I read it, you took a very responsible approach to deciding to have the surgery - as I said, you thought very carefully and decided what you thought was best for you. I'm glad you were one of the people who had good care and a smooth recovery. It's valuable to read of the good experiences too. Unfortunately nobody knows before the surgery just how their body will react.

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    • Edited

      I certainly got that impression, although more recent posts suggests US surgeons are now taking a more conservative approach.

      I am UK based and after my last colonoscopy/CT scan in 2016, my first consultant recommended surgery, due to very severe DD and that I had 3 flares in 6 months (after only having 3 attacks in the previous 16 years).

      He was overruled by his boss who said dietary management only. It took over a year to recover from those attacks, but I have been just fine and pain free (apart from the odd niggle) since. Had I been in the US I'm sure I would have been heavily "persuaded" to have the surgery, but so far I'm glad I haven't. But who knows what the future will bring?

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    • Posted

      If I was back home in Manchester I wouldve paid for private insurance for a bit in order to get my surgery. I had four attacks in 2.5 months. I love the NHS but, they are WAY, WAY too conservative when it comes to elective surgery. My sigmoidectomy was the best decision I could've made. I wasn't going to sit around and wait for a rupture. I advise anyone who's had a micro perforation to book surgery. It's scary, but well worth it imhoπŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»

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  • Edited

    After 7 years of Hospital colonosp 3 times said little rverticulitus and IBS or whatever caused by bile going into my stomach causing diarrhoea because of gallbladder removed so they say Giving me meds such as Gavescon buscapan to no affect other fibre sachets.gave up. All I did was end up in AE from diarrhoea and pain left side ending up on drips. Last trip given antibiotics and that was last year Then one day decided to only eat fresh food nothing microwaved no microwave food Disposed of microwave all together Started take antihistim tablet now and again Found out alergi. to eggs in particular. already not for long time drunk coffee tea as laxitive no fizzy drinks. Relatively now my stomach 80% better and dare I say normal I think it's ridiculous that maybe a allergy test for certain foods whatever could have saved the NHS thousands pounds over 7 years I do know have not got celiac desease though End of thanks for listening Good luck

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    • Posted

      Thanks for the input. I was surprised to read the comment re microwaved food. Common sense makes me wonder how the cooking source (micro vs regular) could have anything to do with it. But I could be wrong. I have been symptom-free for over a year. Then, las week I had a big steak with spicy sauce, and I had a flare up like you wouldn't believe. Pain, fever. I'm on Amox Clav 875 now, which I think is hard on the stomach. But I have to put up with it for 10 days.

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