Trying to regain muscle strength and deal with osteoporosis

Posted , 13 users are following.

I became very weak after I tore a hip muscle, last year with the Pilates Magic Circle. Of course I used this exercise successfully before pred; I thought it would help the bursitis. Wrong! For a long time after this I was limping. I've recovered and am trying to get my general condition improved. I am doing youtube videos for "seniors" and walking on my treadmill. I do something reasonable twice a day. It shocks me how muscle fatigue stops me. Also I cannot help my osteoporosis with high intensity workouts because I cannot tolerate them yet. I am doing the micronutrients for osteoporosis based on the CANADIAN STUDY since I had a reaction to FORTEO. I start taper to 7.75 mg pred next week; nothing hurts.

Any other suggestions?

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15 Replies

  • Posted

    I am almost exactly in the same boat only with pelvic stress fractures that healed well but now, like you, I have to approach the soft tissue rebuild with kid gloves but again like you, I now fatigue so quickly that maybe the kid gloves are the best I can do in any case. I'm 67 and on 7.0 / 6.5. at the moment. I accept knee stiffness in the morning as part of the deal. I'm carrying so much unexpressed stress from being sedentary for more than 6 months that by the end of the day my neck and upper shoulders ache -- although I suspect that a more rigourously applied cinq a sept would take the edge off that.

    My plan is to continue walking at least 20 minutes a day (for errands) until the snow clears enough to slowly increase the amount to 45 minutes. Once summer comes I'll take an Essentrics class and incorporate yoga. In the fall, I'll get another bone mineral density test and if I'm still in the osteoporosis range, I'll seriously consider a bone builder by injection. Of course I'm on D3, K2, and cal mag.

    There are actually at least 2 people in this group with deep experience with osteoporosis. I hope they chime in.

    Best of luck you from the snow-bound Ottawa valley!

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    • Posted

      HARRIE4, I can relate to the fatigue in the neck and shoulders., I took a joint friendly class at my local hospital. At first I had to sit down during the class because my shoulders and neck got so fatigued. That finally went away after many weeks. I am 76.

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    • Posted

      i find qi gong helps alot you can do on bad days and good so many classes to choose from on u tube you just have to find one thats works for u the important thing is the more you move the more you move

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    • Posted

      Not sure this will help. I have both Osteo and PMR. In the months I have had PMR my activity level has gone very low. (some of it due to weather). To-day it is supposed to be hi of 78F last week at this time we had sleet. This morning I took dog to a county, natural park - no paved walks. We stayed for 50 minutes. I could walk very slowly for 32, then sat for 2 minutes and did stretches as my lower back was hurting. This did definitely help my back. I walked for another 15 minutes, but became very tired and the grassy hill up from river to car was a challenge. Last week I told my M.D. that I was joining a gym. He thinks it great idea, however, he said do not use the treadmill until I have gained back strength in leg muscles. I used to be a competitive runner. I am taking 6.75mgs of prednisone daily and hope to reduce that soon. I find stretching very beneficial to my back. When is morning shower have the water as hot as possible on back while I do stretches. I would like to lose 5lb. plus in weight, but at this time seems an impossibility. By the way the osteo in my hands has disappeared since taking the pred.

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    • Posted

      Noosat,

      why did the doc say no treadmill? Any reasonable reason?. Here we have ice and snow and in summer, since I am allergic to mold, and tree pollen, I would NEVER walk if I avoided the treadmill; also simply cannot breathe in high humidity outside.

      To think, a few years ago, I was hiking in the high ALPS.

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    • Posted

      He just wanted me to become a little stronger and not overdo as I might tend to do. His first field of medecine is 'Sports medecine and Pain control'' I've been going to him for 20 yrs as my primary doctor and do trust him. this afternoon after my fairly active morning, I went shopping and did errands, instead of resting for an hour or 2. The class I intend to go to at the gym starts at 1:30p.m., so trying to get my body ready for it. For many years I was a competitive runner, longer distances, played tennis and mountain hiked. However, now, 91 last month I do not have the strength that I used to possess. Although he has never said it to me, I think he realizes I can be compulsive and push myself to the limit. My daughter tells me that subconsciously I think I am wonder woman and can will myself beyond my capacity 😃

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    • Posted

      One reason for not using a treadmill is that using one is not a natural way of walking - the speed is constant and you can't slow down, pause for a moment, look at the view as you would walking normally. That means you are using muscles in a different way and in PMR that can lead to sore muscles faster than going out for the same distance walk along the river or whatever. I have used a treadmill with PMR - but I never felt comfortable. But some people are able to use it fine.

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    • Posted

      When i was at mayo several years ago (pre-pmr, non related issues) their physical therapy team was very opposed to treadmills, stairsteppers, ellipticals, for just the reasons you listed--they said they were unnatural movements; they were adamant that walking on a flat surface was best. if you must use a treadmill or any of the other pieces of equipment, use them only for warmup.

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  • Posted

    I think the key is to be patient. When I go for PT, first they put hot wet towel over the muscles to worm them up, then we do stretching and only after that we do exercise...THen the cool down after. All steps are important and it takes time to rebuild muscles, especially with PMR. What we could do before PMR should be a goal, not immediate, but long term goal.

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  • Posted

    Is it just my imagination -- aka confirmation bias -- that of the various chronic conditions that can emerge after 60, PMR seems to land on a significantly larger proportion of folks with a prior history of active lifestyle? I too was a hut hiker (in the Whites though -- not the Alps) and went downhill skiing after work into my sixties. Odd, how the same pattern seems prevalent in my fellow PMRers....

    Anyway, I am grateful that so many of us are determined to maintain our physical strength and outdoor activities at whatever the highest level is that we can each manage. Its the secret sauce to a full life!

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    • Posted

      Yes. I was at the peak of activity beginning in my 70th year after retirement from a stifling desk job. PMR struck five years later shortly after quickly climbing Humbug Mountain in Oregon. I enjoyed jogging, yoga strengthening twice a week, dance, standing on my head for relaxation, etc.

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    • Posted

      I think it is more to do with the fact that those of us who expected to be able to walk/climb/ski well into our 60s and even 70s are more likely to protest at developing PMR and being restricted in what we can do earlier than we think is fair.

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