Tylenol (acetaminophen) Arthritis

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A nurse highly recommended this to me. It's acetaminophen Arthritis or Tylenol Arthritis 650 mg tabs. They are SLOW release acetaminophen tabs. The bottle says to take two but she said to just take one and that's what I take. That medication combined with some moderate exercise- walking, biking, has worked like a charm for me! She and her Mother had experienced the same results after trying several failed meds or remedies. I was skeptical but so far it's working. I hope it helps. Wishing you peace and relief.

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  • Posted

    Hi John.  Now you have to figure out the mode of action.  Meaning what's the mechanism behind Tylenol as to why it works.   I know Tylenol is a fever reducer and pain reliever but not a blood thinner and not anti-inflmmatory.  Anyways, I have no doubt that it works as well, if not better, than any of the more popular dopamine agonists.

    With that said, can you wait to take Tylenol until your RLS kicks in?  Tylenol is still a drug and not something worthy of taking (like say vitamin c) unless you need it.  Tylenol is pretty readily absorbed so in under an hour your RLS should be retreating, should you choose to wait until the RLS descends upon you.

    Anyways, I did some research on Tylenol's effect, if any, on dopamine and dopamine release and did not find anything worthy of describing.  But I have no doubt that there's something to Tylenol.

    In the process of doing research on Tylenol I think I figured out why under-eating increases people's dopamine receptors and why RLS is more prevalent in obese people.  Food, like drugs of abuse,  stimulate a release of dopamine and hence feelings of pleasure.  And it seems like there's a feedback loop in our brains.  When there's too much dopamine being released then a signal kicks in to ramp our receptors DOWN.  Hence the reason why people need ever more of a drug to get the same amount of pleasure.  Just the opposite happens when we under-eat.  Much less release of dopamine.  Thus the signal is given out to ramp UP our receptors.  "Quick, we need more and better dopamine receptors." 

    And we, with RLS, who seem to be born with too few and/or underperforming dopamine receptors, can probably greatly benefit from this increase.  Especially at night.  Maybe consuming most of our calories before say 5pm may even do the trick.

    It's apparent that just the smallest alteration, ie one tylenol, can make a huge difference in our RLS.  For some it's one teaspoon of mustard or 1/2 teaspoon of cream of tartar or 1/2 litre of tonic water.  For me it's one iron tablet during an attack on an empty stomach...has to be iron bisglycinate.  And I never take it unless the RLS has reared its ugly head.

    Very glad the Tylenol has given you relief.  By the way, I hope you're not taking any drug that may be making your RLS worse than it has to be such as statins, beta blockers, antacids, antidepressants, melatonin.  The list is near endless I'm afraid.  On the bright side, the list of substances that relieve RLS is also growing.  And we have you to thank for now adding to that list.  smile

     

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    • Posted

      Thanks for the feedback! I take it about 1 hour before bed. My RLS comes and goes so I didn't take it the other night to see if it had subsided and it was gone. What you mentioned about under eating makes total sense. In addition, I have noticed that my RLS gets worse after little or no activity, say laying around the house all day. Mine started with mild symptoms after I detoxed from alcohol and started having anxiety and depression. I have a theory that it may be caused by muscle fatigue in our legs, decreased peripheral circulation, and prolonged stress and anxiety causing stress hormones like cortisol and adrenaline to overly sensitize our nerves. Normally we do not feel our body functioning, because the parasympathetic nerves hold the sympathetic nerves in check. It is only when we are overwrought (angry, afraid, excited) that the sympathetic nerves dominate the parasympathetic and we are conscious of certain organs functioning and have an increase in somatic complaints. Anger, fear, stress and excitement will dominate our nerves. I am also convinced that dopamine plays a role. I say that because my RLS got very bad after taking hydrocodone for a while for an injury and then stopping abruptly when I ran out. While I was on the hydrocodone I had zero RLS and felt euphoric because dopamine was being released. Rather than increasing dopamine wth meds though, I think it's healthier to address our overall health and to avoid stress and combat it with a balance of rest and exercise, healthy diet, meditation, massage and any other healthy coping mechanisms. Too strenuous dieting, an exhausting surgery, debilitating illness, hemorrhage, a breakup, an argument, accident, work stress, will all perpetuate a fear, adrenalin, fear cycle and over sensitize our nerves. Even anemia. Some of us maybe fluctuating between a normal red blood cell count and abnormal. Maybe that's why iron helps- because it helps increase RBCs? So I say again balance, avoid and treat stress, even healthy adrenalin producing stress like roller coasters. Treat the dull ache in your legs with Tylenol arthritis, balance rest and light to moderate exercise. Meditate. Pray to your higher power when you feel powerless, lose weight at a healthy rate. I think this a syndrome that a fast paced, technologically advanced, alienating, poor eating, decreased physical activity, anxious and depressed society has caused and why we and doctors are so bewildered. By the way I've heard people recommend hot baths. It probably helps because it promotes relaxation and combats stress. Same with massage. Getting up and walking around helps because your full of adrenaline trying to sit still! More over weight people have it because the stress hormone cortisol causes weight gain.
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    • Posted

      Interesting!  I will have to make note of whether stress can bring on an attack.  Age and hormones for sure.  I've said this before on here, but scientists have found that we with RLS have shoddy dopamine receptors.  The receptors assist in transporting the dopamine from our brains (where scientists claim we have plenty of dopamine - maybe more than average) down our spines (aka the central nervous system) to our  legs and arms (peripheral nervous system) and quiets them.  As we age so do ALL parts of our bodies, including those dopamine receptors that are pretty bad to begin with.  So last night I was watching TV and had RLS.  I thought what the heck triggered it.  Then I remembered that I took a Tagamet (antacid).  One little tiny pill, that's all it takes these days to trigger an episode.  The proton pump inhibitors are more RLS friendly but I don't want to take a daily pill, I prefer to wait until I'm suffering smile.

      I'm a woman but my RBC is that of a very healthy male.  Yet it does nothing to help my RLS.  What does help is taking one bio-available iron pill during an attack on an empty stomach as described above.  We need iron, not so much for our RBC but for our dopamine receptors.  Iron makes our receptors stronger.  But our brains can't call iron up from our stores.  That's the other thing that scientists found, the brains of people with RLS are very low on iron, basically anemic, but not our bodies.  How strange is that?  Anyways, it seems (at least for me) that while that iron is in my bloodstream (not my gut - that's why I have to take a good form) my brain can pick it up and the RLS will go for the night.  But by the dawn's early light, that iron is gone, or stored, and I have to repeat next time I get an attack.  So iron is not a cure.  If it were then none of us would have RLS.

      So undereating and iron will shore up our receptors, albeit temporarily.  It's amazing what a day to day thing RLS is, and how the littlest things can trigger it or suppress it.  I swear, I truly believe that one day of under-eating can help.  Then there are substances which will "force" a release of dopamine from our brains.  Pain killers and dopamine agonists (such as Mirapex) will force this release of dopamine from our brains to our central nervous system.  Then there are natural substances that will do this like a pretty large amount of potassium, or tumeric or the quinine in tonic water.  Quinine is a drug so I really shouldn't include it as a natural (or healthy) dopamine agonist.  But if you're desperate I guess it can't hurt that much.

      So once again, I am left wondering what it is about acetominophin that gets rid of the RLS.  RLS isn't in the legs, or the arms, where people feel it, it's all in the brain.  And yes, surgery, especially if spinal anesthia was used can trigger or worsen RLS.  So can any injury to the back/spinal column.  Anything that creates a bump or road block to that dopamine that's going down our spines on its way to quieting our legs and arms will give us RLS.  The vast majority of the world can have spinal anesthia or injure their back and never have so much as a night of RLS.  But it seems that those of us that are born with shoddy receptors can't afford anything that interferes with our pathetic stream of dopamine.

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  • Posted

    Very interesting discussion. I have had surgery on my spine 6 years ago  (lapidechtomy?) and RLS worsened and 2 years ago I broke my leg and since then the symptoms have become un bearable. I no longer share the marital bed as I am afraid of injuring the wife. I take Ropinorol and vitamins with iron but they do not stop it.

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  • Posted

    Looked up Tylenol on web- it is Paracetomal in the UK

     

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    • Posted

      Paracetomal has never worked for me, before I started with this dreadful RLS, tried it for colds, headache, but only got relief with cocodamol, no point trying this. 

      Definitely need more research into this condition as I don't think some people realise how RLS rules your life. I did a lot of voluntary work in my church which I really enjoyed, loved the company and the laughter with the people there, but about 6 months ago I resigned from all of my duties, I felt I couldn't commit myself anymore because of non sleep. People were sympathatic at first, but have noticed a difference in their approach to me now when I do get the chance to go I feel shunned by some, if it wasn't for my sister in law and a few good friends I probably wouldn't go. We need more drugs made available through research for all of us who suffer from RLS. Could we not form a charity into research for this  to make awareness of this condition.

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    • Posted

      It is a terrible debilitating condition and should, in severe cases, be classed as  a disability. However, unlike people in wheelchairs etc. people do not see the debilitating effect this horrendous condition has upon sufferers. I am a wannabe musician and go to open mic's once a week but have contemplated giving up because of the RLS after a night out. There is a UK charity dedicated to RLS we should support. RLS.org

      Emis Moderator comment: The site given above is a USA site, the UK RLS support group is as below.

      https://rls-uk.org/

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    • Posted

      Couldn't agree with you more, when asked if legs jump, tell them the sensation is like snakes running up and down in both legs and upper arms one reply I got was try quinnine (if only). Will go on this site, my point being we learn a lot about Parkinsons disease, heart disease, MS, etc. and we donate to these charities, but nothing I am aware of regarding RLS, this being such a horrendous condition.
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