Type 2 and Lyxumia

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Hi I have been Diabetic Type 2 for 10 years now it runs in my family with my Dad and my oldest brother having it as well.

I have just had my yearly blood test and been told I need to change my medication and the doctor would like me to go on to Lyxumia although I dont fancy the injecting part I guess I might as well get used to it for when I upgrade to Type 1. Thing is have any of you tried it how easy was it for you to get used to injecting and any side affects etc. I know its new out there only about 2 years old since being passed so I am concerned. Sue

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  • Posted

    Dear sue61881,

    Please let me reassure you, ma'am, that you will NEVER "upgrade to Type 1" ... unless you've been incorrectly diagnosed as a type 2.  They are two different conditions that share only the name diabetes.

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition, where the body's own immune system set out to destroy the beta cells (islets of Langerhans) ... the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas.

    Type 2 diabetes comes about as a result of the body's cells becoming resistant to the effects of the insulin that their pancreas continues to produce. i.e. the body's requirements for more insulin than would normally be the case exists.  As I'm reasonably sure you already know, there are a number of treatment options available, which generally starts with dietary control and exercise.  When/if this isn't sufficient to keep blood glucose (sugar) levels within a 'normal' range, or close to that range, oral medications tend to the added.  There are different types of oral medications, that work in different ways, in an attempt to keep blood glucose levels within, or near to, that 'normal' range.

    Type 2 diabetes tends to be a 'progressive' illness, which means that what tends to be sufficient to keep blood glucose levels 'normal' at one time will often not be sufficient in later years.  This is where medications such as Lyxumia (lixisenatide) and often insulin injections will be required.  Having to inject insulin doesn't make a type 2 diabetic suddently become type 1.  It's simply a treatment option.

    I'm afraid I haven't used Lyxumia (lixisenatide) as I'm a type 1, so needed to start injecting insulin as soon as it was diagnosed.

    You MAY find one of the following webpages informative on what Lyxumia (lixisenatide) is, how it works, etc.

    https://patient.info/medicine/lixisenatide-for-diabetes-lyxumia

    http://www.drugs.com/uk/lyxumia.html

    I wish you the very best of luck, ma'am, and hope you don't find the transition of needing to inject medication(s) too distressing.

    Lots of Love and Light.

     Mick

    x x x x

     x x x

    P.S. Please don't be offended, or alarmed, at the 'x's'.  It's merely a logo, of sorts, that I've used for some 30-odd years now.

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  • Posted

    Hi Sue61881,

    I don't understand if you are type 2 you are type2 how can you upgrade to type 1 am type 2 n use Victoza injection 1 per day which has lowered my A1c from 80 to 59 which they are very pleased about so I just need to eat heathily n do exercise.

    Please could you explain the above cus I don't understand where you are coming from ect;

    I would like to go bk to gym but can't at moment cus of lists of pain in my shoulder I am on morphine at the moment.

    Diligent500.

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    • Posted

      Ok Ok, I get what you are saying I only put it in to get an answer to my question so many times I have asked questions in forums and got no replies at least I got two this time.]

      How are you doing injecting yourself did you find it difficult to stab yourself and do you find it best before breakfast or dinner.

      I have lost faith in my doctors as 10 years ago the doctor was trying to sort out why I kept having strange turns sending me off to buy vitamens etc untill after the next blood test he gave me I had to practically shout at him and tell himto look at the glucose results even I could see they were going up each time then he got me to do a water test and then bluntly come back and tell me Yes you are Diabetic. and since then no matter how much pain I am in with spinal problems & arthritis all they say is your Diabetic I cant give you any other pain killers except Tramadol and Paracetamol. Also when I have said in the beggining do all Diabetics finish as Type 1 and injecting all they ever said was not always My Father died from his Diabetes Type 1 12 years ago and my brother was Type 2 died October last year from MND complications following my Mothers death last year in January, so I dont really have anyone to talk to about it now hence my writing on this forum for a bit of advice. Thanks for answering and yes I am type 2 forever. Sue

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    • Posted

      Dear sue61881,

      Please forgive me for butting in, ma'am.  I appreciate that your last message was to irene05085, but I felt the need to respond as some people are under the wrong impression that once you start taking insulin injections that your diabetes "turns to" type 1.  That is not the case.  As I stated in my first response, the use of insulin is simply a treatment option.

      I appreciate that I don't know you personally, ma'am, but I'm touched by what you've so far had to deal with from your GPs surgery.

      I DO know what you mean about your doctor saying "Yes you are Diabetic".  I've had that for well over 30 years now.  Sadly, if diabetes isn't one of your doctor's specialities it's the easiest option for them to say that, without them actually doing anything to find out the real cause of any symptoms that you might be experiencing.  (SOME doctors tend to believe that if you have diabetes that you should expect various ailments to strike you.  Luckily, for me, at least, I'm in the enviable position of having a personal friend, who happens to be my endocrinologist, who I can contact out of work hours, that will go into quite lengthy detail about why something MIGHT be happening.)

      Tramadol does seem to be one of the 'standard' medications offered to people with diabetes for the treatment of moderate to severe pain.  (I've been on such large doses in the past that I was sleeping most of every day AND every night.  It has a tendency to do that if you're on large doses.)  The reason Tramadol and Paracetamol are used are that they have little to no effect on blood glucose control.  They DO, however, hvae their own inherent dangers, so please don't consider taking more than the prescribed dose(s).  I've been a hospital inpatient, an a HDU (High Dependency Unit) when people have been brought in suffering from 'overdose' of Paracetamol in particular.  Sadly, not all that I saw made a recovery.  It really can be that dangerous.

      Unfortunately, ma'am, the people who responded to you ... probably on other forums ... about type 2 diabetics "not always" becoming type 1 have a lack of knowledge about diabetes.  Type 2 diabetes NEVER becomes type 1, just as type 1 NEVER becomes type 2.

      I'm truly sorry that you lost your Father due to type 1 diabetes, your brother from complications of MND and your Mother.  That really must have hit you hard.  (I lost my own Mom in 1970, but that was from a road traffic accident.  My Dad's still alive, but I haven't seen him in years.  Sadly, the psychological effects of Mom dying left me in a 'bad place'.  I realise that it's been a good many years, but I still 'talk' with my Mom, and I derive benefit from our 'conversations'.)

      You mention that you "don't have anyone to talk to about it now".  If you'd like to talk on a personal level, do please feel free to click on the envelope below my name and send me a personal message.  If you wish, I will give you my personal email address so that we can speak away from this site.  I must warn you, however, that if you do take me up on this offer that if you send an email to my personal email address it will automatically give me yours.  I can assure you, though, that you have absolutely nothing to fear from me.  I am NOT a paedophile, mad axe man, psychopath, etc., and having your personal email address would NOT give me details about where you are from.

      Lots of Love and Light.

       Mick

      x x x x

       x x x

      P.S. Please don't be offended, or alarmed, at the 'x's'.  It's merely a logo, of sorts, that I've used for some 30-odd years now.

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    • Posted

      Thanks for your reply you sound like a good samaritan. You sound American the way you use Maam and Mom. I know I dont know the whole story about your Dad but maybe time can heal and contact should be made while you can. I dont look foreward to November when I have to go back to the Practice nurse to learn to inject but I do feel a bit happier about it now. Take care.

      from Sue

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    • Posted

      Hi mick, you seem to have some experience with this. the dr told me today that i have diabeties and I just said I couldn't deal with it and I didn't want to know. It was such a shock. I will go back in a week or so when I've processed this. After having really bad side effects from taking statins which I've now stopped, I've kind of lost faith in GP's for certain things as they can't be expected to know everything. should I ask to be referred to an endocrinologist?
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    • Posted

      Dear jane14277,

      I'm more than sure that your doctor already appreciates just how much of a shock it is to you that you've just been diagnosed with a chronic condition ... chronic in that it will remain with you for the rest of your life.  Sometimes it's hard to accept things when someone has just told you that a life-changing thing is happening to you ... life-changing in that there are changes that you'll need to make in order for you to be able to better control things.

      I must say, ma'am, that it's reassuring that you have the intelligence to realise that you WILL process this information.  (Please don't misunderstand my rather poor choice of words, but I wasn't trying to suggest that you might have a lack of intelligence.  I just couldn't think of the proper way to express what it is that I'm trying to say.  Maybe, if I'd studied more when I was at school I'd have learned?)

      I appreciate how you've "lost faith" in GPs, having suffered with bad side-effects from taking statins.  Did your doctor even try substituting one statin for another?  Although similar in the way that they work, some statins tend to have more of an adverse effect on some people than do other statins.  You don't indicate which specific side-effects you suffered from, but did you inform your doctor of them?  If they were particularly bad side-effects, s/he should have stopped them very quickly.

      If you're interested in finding out more details of the different types of side-effects that statins can cause in SOME people, have a look at the links on the following webpage:

      http://www.drugs.com/search.php?searchterm=side+effects+of+statins

      It's good that you're wise enough to be able to understand that GPs can't be expected to know everything.  That's why some doctors specialise in specific conditions. i.e. the endocrinologist that you mention would specialise in hormone-related disorders.

      It's difficult to say whether you do actually need to be referred to see an endocrinologist, ma'am, as I don't know anything about you.  Your doctor will, obviously, know much more detail about you, such as whether you have close family members with diabetes, whether you've suffered with gestational diabetes during one or more pregnancies, whether you have any comorbid medical conditions, your weight, your level of activity, your ethnicity, etc.  ALL of these things CAN make a difference as to whether your doctor would diagnose you as a type 1 or a type 2 diabetic.  There are various different blood tests that can be performed if there's any doubt, or suspicion, about which type of diabetes you might have.  (There are also other types of diabetes, but type 1 and type 2 are the most common ones seen.)

      You COULD ask your doctor whether you should be referred to see an endocrinologist.  I'm quite sure that s/he will be able to tell you why they are so sure as to their diagnosis.

      Has your doctor advised, in the meantime, steps that you could try to help your condition?  This would be such things as dietary advice ... eating a lower amount of carbohydrates ... and taking more exercise, if you are able.  (Carbohydrates break down, during the digestive process, to release glucose, which gets absorbed into the bloodstream.  This, of course, raises blood glucose levels in people that are diabetic.  I'm making a very big assumption here that your doctor has diagnosed you with type 2 diabetes.  I could, of course, be totally wrong.  If it is the case, however, this would indicate that youir body's cells are resistant to the effects of the insulin that's produced by your pancreas.  Exercise helps to lessen this resistance. i.e. it makes your body better able to utilise the insulin that is being produced, which helps to lower blood glucose levels.)

      Dependent on what your blood glucose levels were when tested, diet and exercise MAY be all that's required of you to control your blood glucose levels.  I must say, however, that this is NOT always the case.  Some type 2 diabetics would need to go onto oral medications and, in time, find that they MAY need to go onto injectable forms of medication, or even insulin injections.

      I wish you well, ma'am, and truly do hope that you're able to come to terms with what's happening.  Do feel free to contact me if you feel the need for a bit of moral suppot.

      Lots of Love and Light.

       Mick

      x x x x

       x x x

      P.S. Please don't be offended, or alarmed, at the 'x's'.  It's merely a logo, of sorts, that I've used for some 30-odd years now.

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  • Posted

    Dear sue61881,

    Sorry about that, ma'am.  I've just realised that the envelope icon probably won't be available under my name as it's not me that's asked the question.

    If you click on my name, it will take you to my page on Patient.info.  I've just updated my details on there, and included my email address.

    Lots of Love and Light.

     Mick

    x x x x

     x x x

    P.S. Please don't be offended, or alarmed, at the 'x's'.  It's merely a logo, of sorts, that I've used for some 30-odd years now.

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  • Posted

    Hi Sue61881,

    I first do my blood sugar which is about 12 in a morning after I get up, I then have breakfast which is sometime muslie n fruit blackberries a handful.

    Afterwards I inject liraglutide 1.6 after turning to the right setting on my pen no it dosnt usually hurt but on occasions it does for some reason.

    The downside of this is weight gain which I hate as

    I want to loose weight not gain it in my case.

    My mum in law was type 2 n on insulin n was massive n died in 2009.

    I seriously do not want to follow in her footsteps so

    I try to keep my diabetes under control but it's very hard when hubby buy s cake n biscuits n with grandchildren around with sweets ect;

    Dolphin500.

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    • Posted

      Hi Irene05085

      .

      Thanks for your reply this helps me a lot.

      My morning blood is normally between 6.5 and 8.5

      my breakfast is a bowl of Bran Flakes mixed with Special K with 1/2 a banana and a couple of grapes chopped up just to make it tasty.

      I have bought a treadmill and do approx 2.5km a day to try to keep my weight down.

       

      It feels like my whole lofe is controlled by when to eat and take tablets etc.

      I must admit we like cake with our afternoon cup of tea but we dont buy cakes these days as I make them all now using Canderel granuals which is just as good as putting sugar in them.As for sweets I just dont have them now as I have tried sugar free and they make me put on weight. The only problem is my younger brother always sends us a box of speciality chocolates for birthdays and Christmas and  I know we like them but I wish he wouldnt send them but I dont want to offend him as we dont get in touch much.

       Take care Sue

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  • Posted

    Oooh, stop it, sue61881.  You're making me out to be better than I really am.

    The ma'am comes from my respect for people ... women in particular, of course.  It stems from my secondary school days, some 40 years ago, and was continued during my military service.  I'm British, by the way, though I have served with one of our American cousins' regiments. I'll be frank with you ... so long as you don't mind me changing my name for a few seconds ;-).  The guys I served with didn't seem to show much respect for anyone.  I did witness, on a few occasions, when female members of the regiment showed their disapproval and physically punched men. he he.

    Unfortunately, Sue, the thing with my dad and myself is long-standing.  For a long time I blamed him for the death of my mom.  (If he hadn't been such a lazy 'b', he'd have gone out to work, so mom wouldn't have needed to be out delivering leaflets so that we kids could be fed.)  I could probably write a book about our existence, and how he was the main reason for me joining the Army.  If I hadn't, either he'd be dead, or I would now.  (I thought I had killed him on one occasion, after he came in drunk and I stated that I thought he had a drink problem.  He punched me, and I retaliated.)

    I'm sorry that it's taken me so long to respond to your message, ma'am, but I've been experiencing 'problems' with my computer.  Now that we're into November, I'm presuming that it's not long before you see the Practice Nurse for 'training' on how to correctly inject.  My thoughts are with you, and I'm reasonably sure that you'll come through it with 'flying colours'.  It's important that you do learn how to inject correctly ... using the correct sites, angle of injection, etc. as you could cause minor damage to yourself without it.

    I'm truly glad that you feel "a bit happier about it" as it really is for your best interests.

    I wish you well, ma'am.  Can I ask you to let me know how things are going for you?  I may not know you personally ... and that's a cruel twist of fate ... but I do have a genuine interest.

    Lots of Love and Light.

     Mick

    x x x x

     x x x

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    • Posted

      Hi Mick

      I hope you and your computer are still talking ??. I did send a reply to your email address but have heard nothing so I guess may be you are still having problems.

      When I went to the nurse on Wednesday I was told the doctor now feels that I can have a choice of injections or a different tablet which has side affects. Me being chicken I decided to go for the tablets which will keep me going for a while untill nexttime when I will almost certainly have to go for the injection, but with all of what I have been told on here I will be able to cope with it I hope.

      I am sorry to hear the story of your past with your father, drink has got a lot to answer for. Maybe time will not heal that pain so easily and I am sorry for that.

      Please dont stop connecting with us all here as you do a good job with your advice and I still think you are a good samaritan.

      Take care

      Sue

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  • Posted

    Hi its me again.

    Instead of injecting the doctor had a change of heart and decided to give me Dapagliflozin to try.

    Has anyone used it as I am in the first week and I seem to feel some how  bloated and sometimes sicky and last night in bed I felt like my whole body was thumping inside my stomache sort of hurt I felt sick and couldnt get up out of be to help my husband when he was needing help ( he was constant coughing ) I was like that for about an hour. Has anyone else had this or is it just coincidence as none of this is in the leaflet.

    Thanks from Sue

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