Under Active Thyroid?

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Hi, I am a 56 year old man, I was diagnosed with Vestibular Neuronitis (VN) 10 months ago and have not improved in all that time (I have had all the usual MRI/MRA scans as this was neceassry to enable a diagnosisi of VN).  I have been monitored for underactive thyroid for around 4 years as my TSH results have ranged from around 5 to 8.7 during that time, it is currently 7.  There is an overlap in a lot of the VN symptoms with Hypothyroidism but some of my symptoms are not typical of VN, these include pins and needles/tingling around my head and face, tops of my legs and the bottom of my arms/top of my hands.  I also get a very nervous edgy feel, have a poor sleep pattern and feel very fatigued most days and occasional sluggish speach.  I feel that my VN is not improving as I may be suffering issues with my thryoid but all my GP's surgery ever do is continue to monitor my TSH results.  Are these symptoms typical of Hypothyroidism and if so does anyone have any advice on what I should do? .

 

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  • Posted

    Hello Laurence:

    My name is Shelly and  I am a nurse in the USA.  I have Hashimoto's thyroid disease.

    Having Low thyroid (hypothyroid) symptoms are: Feeling cold, feeling depressed, dry skin & britte nails, being tired/fatigue, weight gain, brusing, confusion/brain fog, there are more these are most common.

    Like you said many of your symptoms fit with your Vestibular Neuronitis. which are the tingling & pins and needles feelings. 

    If your TSH  is over 5.60 you would be Hypothyroid and in need of hormone replacement.  Normal TSH is 0.34 to 5.60 in that range and you should ask for a low dose of Levothyroxine.

    Our body needs the levels of thyroid hormone to be correct and it may help to reduce your VN situation.

    You need to call your doctor and ask for 25mcg of Levothyroxine.  Let us know how you do with this.  It will take the body about 6 to 8 weeks to make  a new level.

    Stay well,

    Shelly

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    • Posted

      Hi Shelley,

      Thank you very much for the information and advice.  I am off to see my consultant next wednesday 11th about the VN.  On my first visit to him back in June he did comment about my thyroid so hence the reason for having a further test carried out (and the many thyroid type symptoms I am suffering).  I will ask him if he will refer me to a consultant specialising in thyroid conditions as it will probably be quicker than going through our NHS.  Unfortunately in Briatin GP's rarely prescribe medication unless the result is over 10.

      One other thing that I have been doing is checking my temperature, the past 3 mornings I have had readings of 36c, 35.9c and 35.8c, I understand that low body temperature can also be an indication of under active thyroid?

      Once again many thanks for the advice which is even more reassuring given that you are a nurse.  I will let you know how I get on.

      Best wishes

      Laurence

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    • Posted

      Hello Laurence:

      You are correct having a low body temp is also a symptom of Hypothyroidism. Make a log of all your thyroid symptoms for the  consultant you will see on Nov. 11.  It sometimes helps if you hand a list of your symptoms to the doctor (or specialist) and say that you have been experiencing these. 

      Since you had a TSH that was 7 if you can get a copy of that report and show it to the consultant you see. Your medical records or lab reports by law can be given to you so you can get that from the doctor who ordered it. All you have to do is ask the medical asst. or receptionist for a copy.

      I know many on this forum say they even have done blood work outside of NHS, and then have taken the lab reports to their NHS doctor.

      Please let me know how you do, I care!

      Regards,

      Shelly

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    • Posted

      Hi Shelly,

      I have printed a symptom sheet off from a UK thyroid website and ticked all the symptoms I have (which is a good many).  Like I said I know some of these overlap with VN but there are many that are only typical of underactive thyroid.  As you suggest I will ask my GP's surgery to let me have a copy of my thyroid test results and take with me.

      I have considerred having my bloods done privately but my VN consultant may suggest this on Wednesday, he is very good.

      Once again thank you for your help and advice, I will let you know the outcome after my appointment on Wednesday.

      Kind regards

      Laurence

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    • Posted

      Hi Shelley,

      I last contacted you around a month ago in regard to my TSH levels.  I have since had another blood test ad my TSH had gone back down to 5.2 hence my GP will not prescribe any medication.  I have been monitored for around 4 years with my results going up and down like a bouncing ball.  I think I have said that over this time my results have ranged from around 5 to 8.7, would you say this is typical of Hypothyroidism (I do have many of the symptoms associated with this)?  I will be seeing my GP again on Monday and will ask if he will refer me to an endocrologist.  Autoimmune illnesses do run in my family, thryoid issues is one of them.

      Many thanks for any help or advice you can give.

      Best wishes

      Laurence

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    • Posted

      Hello Laurence:

      Hashimoto's can do that to your TSH. It is one of the notable characteristics of it.   Most reference ranges are 0.45 to 4.50 UK ranges and some are 0.34 to 5.60 (USA), for the TSH. Most doc's like the TSH to  be 1.0 to 3.0 and not much higher than that even though the range is broader than 1.0 to 3.0.  

      Hashimoto's is autoimmune and you can appear normal on TSH because in the early stages it tends to swing back between Hypo to Hyper.  So you can look  good on paper on a blood test, but unless they look for the Antibodies it could be missed.

      Very important ask for a TPOA ( protein antibodies test) if you have autoimmune in your family this is a marker test that will show antibodies present in the blood. Also a Thyroglobulin Serum test.

      Also ask for T3 and T4 along with above.  Also to make sure minerals in the body are okay.  Ask for calcium, potassium, magnesium, sodium, and ferritin and iron, along with Vit D and B-12. Many of us are low in the minerals and certain Vitamins, esp. with thyroid disease.

      See an Endocrinologist because some  GP's may not be as knowledgeable on the thyroid and just think everything is okay. Make sure you tell GP about a family history of autoimmune problems.

      Let me know how the appointment goes,

      Shelly

       

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    • Posted

      Hi Shelly,

      Thak you so much for the advice, I will ask about all of these things when I see my GP tomorrow.

      Have a good Christmas.

      Best wishes

      Laurence

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