Understanding Blood Results

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Hello!

I suffer from pretty much every symptom of Hypothyroidism listed on the NHS website. Sensitivity to cold, weight gain, muscle cramps, irregular/heavy periods. The list goes on. I also have an increasingly appaling memory, though I'm not sure they're linked. I'm 32 and my mother is also Hypothyroid. I had my thyroid tested a couple of years ago and was told results were normal and that was that, so I've just been getting on with it since but it's making me miserable now. I'm exhausted and irritable all the time and its just sucking the life out of me. I decided to have my blood tested again by a private company. I've since got the results back but can't really make sense of them. They suggested I see my own gp given that my thyroid antibodies are high, even though the thyroid itself seems normal. Suggesting an auto immune thyroid condition. My gp however shrugged it off and said no, all is well. I'd be eternally grateful if anyone could look at these results for me and see if there's anything at all to indicate thyroid, or if this is just the way I am for some reason or something else is causing it. Thanks so much!

THYROID STIMULATING HORMONE 1.34 mIU/L range 0.270 -4.200

Free Thyroxine 13.85 pmol/L range 12.000-22.000

Total Thyroxine (T4) 85.1 nmol/L range 59.000-154.000

Free T3 4.73 pmol/L range 3.100-6.800

Thyroglobulin Antibodies 204.700 IU/mL range 0.000-115.000

Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies 7.75IU/mL range 0.000-34.000

Hope that lot makes sense to someone....

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10 Replies

  • Posted

    Hi Vonny, that makes total sense. Read through my note here a couple of times, because you likely have brain fog. You are right to be concerned. You have a family history, and my personal experience has been that changes in the female cycle were a very obvious clue.

    Now... Your thyroxin levels are on the low end of the range and your Thyroglobulin antibodies are high. This means your immune system is bahaving hostilely towards thyroid functions, and the high antibodies will interfere with thyroid function. Many people who've had thyroid disease for extended periods of time don't have spiked TSH, particularly with Hashimoto's. This is because by the time you get tested,my our body has given up trying to adjust by more TSH. If you check your old labs, you might find your TSH was above 2 at some point. For many peoples a TSH even slightly above 2 can indicate a serious problem. 

    Ok, don't freak out... You have autoimmune disease, in the form of hypothyroidism. Probably Hashimoto's. A good endocrinologist will be able to diagnose and help you with meds. I would recommend reading as much as you can about thyroid disease, and read though the many thyroid posts here. You have a wealth of information at your fingertips and there are many things you can do with diet and supplements to manage the disease, especially in the early phases.

    Many others have been through the various phases of thyroid disease and are happy to share the results of our years of struggle, in the hopes of helping to prevent others from hardship.

    Hope that helps.

     

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    • Posted

      Thank you so much for taking the time to respond. I really appreciate it. The problem I have is that although I am experiencing symptoms my GP will do nothing until my figures are outwith "normal" I can't refer myself nor afford private treatment. The antibodies figure was a red flag for the private company which tested my blood, but was dismissed out of hand by my own gp.

      I am definitely willing to try diet changes, supplements. Anything at all that improves my day to day living.

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    • Posted

      Vonny, your experience is typical. You'll need to find a really good endocrinologist. Also, because of the brainfog associated with thyroid disease, please read through the responses several times. 

      Feel free to PM me for questions about what I've found to be helpful.

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  • Posted

    Agree, you have Hashimoto's hence the high antibodies.  But, I would have to disagree with meds right now, though I 'm sure others would say otherwise.  Just do your research and you need to make that desicion on your own. Your thyroid is not damaged enough to be put on meds yet and is working fine for now and keeping up with your bodies needs.  Being put on meds right now, will actually make your thyroid stop functioning on it's own (which by looking at your numbers, seems fine ) and have to rely on the meds for the rest of your life.  There are more natural ways to help your thyroid function for longer on it's own before needing meds, though I didn't go that route unfortunatly and now have to be on meds forever.   I wish I did though.  I'm sure others will chime in on the more natural ways that will help keep your thyroid funcioning as long as it can on it's own.  I know that selenium is one good way to help lowering your antibodies, diet changes, and ashwagandha which will also help to balance your thyroid levels and balance your adreanal glands.  There are many others, just do your research before making a desicion.  Best wishes...

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    • Posted

      Thank you for taking the time to respond. I'm absolutely open to trying diet changes etc to help how I feel. The only thing I can't understand is if my thyroid function is normal and it is coping with what my body needs, why do I feel so crap? All my other bloods came back fine, hormones, Iron etc. So the only thing I can link the way I'm feeling to is my thyroid.

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    • Posted

      Vonny, you feel like crap, likely because your immune system is inactivating your thyroid function. Your high antibodies show this.  A lot of people here have been through this where blood work doesn't always scream thyroid problem, but the giant growth on the neck does. This is very typical for thyroid disease, to have difficulty getting a diagnosis. You'll likely have better luck with an endocrinologist than a GP.

      You may also want to look into B, D and mineral supplements, as deficiencies can look like thyroid disease. 

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    • Posted

      Hmm interesting, I found this study they did in Australia.. they found that high thyroid antibodies even with a normal TSH, can cause symptopms that mimick hypothyroidism and that the higher the antibodies, the more severe symptoms.   It stated... Even if antibodies against the thyroid gland don’t cause hypothyroidism (thyroid hormone levels below the normal range,) researchers have for shown that high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies may still cause symptoms.  even when thyroid function is normal, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, indicating autoimmune thyroid disease, are associated with increased symptoms like fatigue and decreased overall quality of life. Autoimmune conditions, including Hashimoto’s, often require more comprehensive treatment incorporating diet and lifestyle changes and supplementation with thyroid-supportive nutrients and herbs. Natural therapies to support the body’s detoxification and anti-inflammatory pathways may also be utilized and help decrease symptoms related to autoimmune thyroid disease.   So, I found this info interesting.  Which would bring us back to diet and perhaps herbs and to focus on bringing down your high antibodies.    Also, there are many other things that can also mimick hypothyroidism such as, vitamin deficiencies, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, arthritis, depression, pituitary disorders, adreanal gland issues, diabetes, anxiety, bi-polar, hormone deficiencies, lupus, againg, stress, fibromyalgia, sleep disorders, and I'm sure there's many others.  So, I suppose that's also another reason why most doctors don't like to give meds if your TSH is in the normal range.  So, my only advice would be to work on getting your antibodies lower and I hope you'll start to feel better, or you could find a different doctor.. one who will give you a low dose of thyoid medication to try. Hope this helps some and I'm not confusing you.. Best wishes..

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    • Posted

      I have to agree with Melissa. I say this, having come full circle with the meds. There are a lot of dietary changes you can make and supplements available to help reverse thyroid disease. 

      Consider, it takes years to develop thyroid disease, and even years to adjust the meds. Keep in mind, results from dietary changes and supplements will also be very slow. Your best friend is research. Because with thyroid treatment, you're always on blind faith until you get way far into it enough to get results, which is months at least. If you see improvement sooner, all the better, but don't expect any results in less than three months. Even meds take that long to level out completely.

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  • Posted

    Some people feel less tired and less irritable with a T3 level at about 75% of the normal range

    Ask your physician to read the research.

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