Unexpected Improvement Following Cystoscopy

Posted , 7 users are following.

I had a cystoscopy done last week by a new uro I'd consulted with. For over a year I've had lower abdominal pain that my previous uro had attributed to a non-cancerous inflammation on my bladder wall secondary to BPH. I'd also experienced a chronic burning sensation in the tip of my penis when urinating. Both of those symptoms in addition to typical BPH issues caused by obstruction of the flow.

So oddly, ever since I came out of the procedure last Wednesday both the lower abdominal pain and the pain while urinating have completely vanished. My flow opened up noticeably also, though it still takes 5+ seconds to start and I still have to go once an hour on average. . I'd had a couple of cystos in the prior 3 years by my prior uro leading up to a UroLift procedure and to biopsy the inflammation on my bladder wall with no such change in symptoms.

Obviously I'm elated but really confused why these changes occurred. The only things I can figure are that he may have dilated my urethra during the procedure ( I was still a little loopy when he talked with me afterwards and hadn't peed enough to notice any difference yet), which relieved symptoms from a possible stricture. As for the lower abdominal pain, I do remember that they gave me some Levaquin in recovery, just one dose, I think as a preventive measure against infection from the procedure. I have never been diagnosed with chronic prostatitis and suppose that could have been the source of the lower abdominal pain...but I've never heard of one dose of any antibiotic knocking out a persistent bacterial infection, eve one known for its ability to penetrate the prostate.

I'd be curious to hear any theories as to what caused the improvement of my symptoms.

BTW, he said I still need a TURP because of the size of all three lobes from what he saw during the cysto. He was unable to see any of the 5 UroLift implants I'd had placed about 3 years ago due to the tissue growth.

0 likes, 13 replies

Report / Delete

13 Replies

  • Posted

    Maybe you shouldn't be too elated yet as it may be a temporary phenomenon. Sorry.

    Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Mike, I agree that in either case (urethral dilation and/or prostatitis that may have responded to an antibiotic) that the relief could be temporary. Even if that's the case, the experience should provide my uro with some valuable info on how to treat my issues longer term. But I'll never excuse or downplay my own elation when something involving pain that has been a persistent problem for me for up to 3 years suddenly goes away, temporary or not.

      Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

    Quote : " He was unable to see any of the 5 UroLift implants I'd had placed about 3 years ago due to the tissue growth. "

    No one has mentioned tissue overgrowth on the implants previously or answered my questions that the implants cannot forever not grow and be held in position and not cause obstruction again later.

    Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Derek, I spoke with someone at NeoTract a while back to get their view on what happens when a patient who previously had UroLift implants placed needs to undergo a subsequent treatment approach that removes tissue in which the implants may be present. I was not concerned about any of the follow-on TURP-like procedures, since the urologist would be actively removing that tissue and there is a procedure for the implants to be partially removed in that scenario.

      Instead, I was concerned about what would happen in the case of a PAE or Rezum procedure in which the IR/Urologist was not actively removing tissue during the procedure. I could not understand how the Urethral End Piece (using NeoTract's terminology) could remain mechanically secure due to loss in tension in the suture that connects the urethral end piece to the Capsular Tab as tissue within the targeted transition zone shrinks from the PAE or Rezum treatment. The whole point of those two procedures is to cause the urethra to widen from the shrinkage of underlying tissue in the transition zone through which the Urolift suture runs and within which the urethral end piece is "anchored." I still don't understand how the urethral end piece would not end up dangling in the newly opened channel where it would likely cause issues. Neither of the physicians I consulted about PAE and Rezum could explain that, just saying that it's not a problem. The person I spoke with at NeoTract explained what happens when the implants are being removed (partially, the capsular tab can't be removed) during a TURP-like procedure, but deferred to the surgeons to answer the other two scenarios.

      Sometimes it's both a blessing and a curse to have an inquisitive mind. 😉

      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      I would say that if they can't explain it wouldn't want it. It obviously must be happening quite a lot as Urolift has been around for a while now.

      Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

    Did your doc put you on proscar to reduce the swelling of the prostate. It sounds like you have been battling this tissue for some time. I was on it for years but even so I had a TURP about 3 or 4 years ago with success. But am still on proscar. But anyone reading this and contemplating TURP I hope you are not on blood thinner because that can complicate things - big time for me.

    Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      I had my second laser prostate procedure while on Wafarin that I was supposed to stop for two days. As I was still passing blood on the second day they sent me home with a catheter in to free up the bed. I stopped the Warfarin on day four.

      Now I don't take warfarin as I had an Amplatezer amulet fitted that acts as a filter in my left atrial appendage and stops any clots getting through.

      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Hi Glenn, my other uro mentioned it to me when we first talked about medication 3 years ago and neither of us wanted to go down that path.

      Also, if your surgical team failed to include blood thinners on the list of things they ask you about multiple time as part of the pre-op routine, then that is a big error IMO. That's why you're instructed to avoid aspirin and NSAIDs, for example 7-10 days prior to even the simplest procedure such as a colonoscopy or cystoscopy.

      Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

    Russ,

    If you had a rigid cystoscopy under GA then you will have had a hydrodistention of your bladder with it. For those of us who have bladder wall inflammation, called interstitial cystitis, as well as BPH, the hydrodistention relieves the symptoms for a while Unfortunately the relief is only temporary so don't expect it to last forever.

    Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Thank you very much for that insight, Twiglet. I did have a rigid cysto under MAC. I don't know if I was completely knocked out but I can't remember anything after when they were trying to get me to scoot further over on the table in the OR. The nurse anesthetist gave me versed and fentanyl via IV prior to being rolled into the OR which I refer to as "phuckitol." 😉

      That said, I was told during a 1 week post op phone call from the surgery center staff that I was dilated which explains the improved stream. I didn't ask about hydrodistension but was aware that some degree of it is standard during rigid cyctos.

      Report / Delete Reply

Join this discussion or start a new one?

New discussion Reply

Report or request deletion

Thanks for your help!

We want the forums to be a useful resource for our users but it is important to remember that the forums are not moderated or reviewed by doctors and so you should not rely on opinions or advice given by other users in respect of any healthcare matters. Always speak to your doctor before acting and in cases of emergency seek appropriate medical assistance immediately. Use of the forums is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and steps will be taken to remove posts identified as being in breach of those terms.

newnav-down newnav-up