Using a nebuliser

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Hi all I am thinking of buying a nebulizer due to having a chest infection which seems to be on going from the start of winter. Any info would be greatly appreciated. Has anyone had improvement s when using a nebulizer? How do you go on with the medication supply for them? Is it best to get GPS advice before purchasing one

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  • Posted

    Hi Sue if you are living in UK and under the NHS,

    yes you will need to check with your GP first to be sure he / she is prepared to perscribe the meds for use in the nebulizer.

    In UK nebulizers are not normally prescribed or offered to patients unless the usual inhaler meds are not working, or the patient is unable to breathe in the inhaler medicine successful when all other options are exhausted. 

    My understand from community matron who speaks at our Breathe Easy group says the nebulizer is usually a last resort because the nebulizer is something to rely on when the patient has great difficulty inhaling lung medicine in the normal manner or the patient cannot get relief from the normal lung medicine even when they are prescribed oxygen.

    Ongoing chest infections are treated with ABs and steroid tablets, if the chest infection remains after you finish your prescribed course of treatment you need to go back to the doc and get further medicine to clear it, often a sputum sample tested can then indicate the appropriate anti biotic required.

    Don't try and manage a chest infection without the appropriate medicines, you risk further lung damage and increased threat of pneumonia and hospitalisation if you do.

    Best wishes V

      

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    • Posted

      Thank you Vee, gonna make appointment on Monday. This latest chest infection is really getting me down now. Coughing up mucus continually but it's white in colour so my gp probably won't prescribe any thing. I've had this for 5 weeks now the wheezing is really bad too. Had a course of amoxicillin 4weeks ago but it didn't help.
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    • Posted

      Sue I hope you heed what Vee says about only following meds/dosages prescribed for you & your body. No one would ever tell me to use 10 hits of my Ventolin in my spacer as that would trigger massive tachycardia for me.
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  • Posted

    I have used a nebuliser on many occasions when my breathing has been affected by chest infections. If you go to A & E it is the first thing they do. However I have asked my Doctor's Surgery if I should buy one (as recommended by a ship's doctor) and they stated NO. They will not support the use of home nebulisers. They claim that there are plenty of home inhalers which do the same job. Don't know whether this helps but speak to your GP about it.
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  • Posted

    I have read that using a spacer with a standard asthma inhaler is just as good as a nebuliser. I don't actually know if that is true, but certainly a GP would prescribe a space with no problems at all, so it is worth a try.

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  • Posted

    Hi Sue

    FYI, same in States regarding meds for nebulizer, must have an Rx. Might be able to buy the machine without an Rx but no insurance plan nor Mdicare/caid would pay or reimburse you Most pulmos where I live prescribe them for some patients some of the time, but it's quite likely they get a kickback from the supplier. However I don't know of any doc who prescribes the machines for anyone who doesn't have diagnosed major lung disease underlying the immediate crisis.

    Spacers are very helpful with L-shaped inhalers. It is not uncommon to have wheezing plus tons of mucus without any infection, especially if one tends toward bronchitis.

    I hope that you feel better soon.

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  • Posted

    Hi Sue,

    I have read on here and I've been told by my "Rocket" nurse that by using Ventolin through a spacer ten times has the same effect as a nebuliser.  You inhale one puff through the spacer then repeat that a further nine times.  I haven't had the need to do this fortunately but I hope this helps you.

    Best wishes to you.

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  • Posted

    Hi Sue regarding deanne77778 reply, the advice her rocket nurse gave her.  The dose may not be the correct thing to do for you, but do check with your doctor or respiratory nurse or team, their views on this and what may be your best options.

    You need to be guided by your own medical professionals as to medicines and dose, as it is they who are aware of your medical history.  

    Sometimes instructions given to individual patients from their respiratory medics is just for the individual patient and may not apply to every individual.

     

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