Vertigo came back after Epley Maneuver

Posted , 2 users are following.

I had the epley manyvwe fine 4 times about 2 weeks ago. I felt worse for a few days after but now I have been feeling so mug better. Today I felt great until after dinner. I felt like I was swaying and things were moving around me. I know how to do the maneuver myself do should I try that? I’m tired of dealing like this especially if it came back after treatment. It makes me depressed and anxious. 

Any thoughts? 

1 like, 13 replies

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13 Replies

  • Posted

    It makes me wonder if you didn't keep your head still for long enough after your Epley and that the crystals have shifted again. Did you sleep upright for 2 nights after too?

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    • Posted

      I tried to keep my head upright but sometimes I had to look down to study. I slept with my head propped up but didn’t sleep completely upright 
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  • Posted

    You might nee to repeat the Epley. I use the half-somersault maneuver at home myself.
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  • Posted

    Hi I have had 9 Epley, tons of half somersaults. Taken medication gone through VRT, none of which made any difference.  A manoeuvre will give me temporary relief but as soon as I lie down to left and stay there more than 25 mins the spinning starts. I now only  sleep on good side. Been like this too long, have asked my ent to look into other more drastic options. Getting into my 4th year. Most people will find relief from Epley - good luck! ❤️
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  • Posted

    Maybe it wasn't BPPV in the first place? Other inner ear conditions are often wrongly diagnosed as BPPV. If it isn't this, then the Epley won't do any good.

    Jackie is right, however. You do need to stay upright after an Epley. Different specialists give different times. After my last one, the physiotherapist told me to keep my head completely still and upright for at least 12 hours (I managed 15) and then sleep propped up and turned to the good side - which took a bit of organising. I was absolutely fine. I felt drunk for a few days but the spinning and falling sensation disappeared completely.

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  • Posted

    I was never told to remain upright by any of mine although that makes sense! Lily is right you need to ensure it is BPPV. It could me vestibular neuronitis as that causes vertigo or vestibular migraine aka migraine associated vertigo. It seems all of these mimic each other closely. Mine is definitely BPPV due to nystagmus in one of the tests. X
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    • Posted

      I have vestibular neuronitis, vestibular migraine as well. Definitely BPPV. I am in the small percentage of people apparently whose crystals don’t stay put. My specialist likened in to a snow shaker. The bppv has been diagnosed by 3 consultants now. I really hope I can get surgery or an injection to get some relief x
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    • Posted

      Hi Sarah,

      I've just answered your PM, but I'll re-post my response here as well, just in case.

      -------

      Good heavens no, Sarah. I'm a former nurse, but my speciality was neuro. I've been forced to learn more about BPPV specifically because I've had three attacks in the past 25 years - including two in the past year (one in each ear!)

      I don't know a lot about VN, labyrinthitis or Ménière's, except that you're always better off going to a neurotologist or a balance/vertigo clinic if you can get to one, rather than seeing an ENT doctor for any kind of vestibular disorder. A few of them are skilled in this area, but the majority seem to specialise more in the more common nuts and bolts of ENT work.

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    • Posted

      I see just wondered because you seem to know so much. I am seeing a neurologist he has also diagnosed bppv.... mine is with me every day. Trust me I have done everything asked of me... daily vertigo for 4 years is more than enough.

       

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    • Posted

      Oh, I can well understand that Sarah! My first attack of BPPV, 25 years ago, dragged on for about a year before it finally subsided spontaneously, and it was absolute misery. It was also made very much worse - albeit temporarily - by the hamfisted intervention of an ENT doctor who clearly hadn't a clue what he was doing. Hence my suspicion of his kind!

      It's my understanding, both from my own research and from what I've heard on these boards, that the best specialist to see is a neurotologist. That's not the same as a neurologist. A neurotologist (called an otoneurologist in some countries) has an understanding of both the workings of the brain's own balance function and its interaction with the inner ear.

      The exception to this rule is if you have a clear-cut diagnosis of uncomplicated BPPV, when a vestibular physiotherapist is the go-to, as this can be cured by a correctly performed one-off Epley manoeuvre. However, that's clearly not the case for you.

      I do hope you can finally get the help you need.

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