Weight gain after gallbladder surgery

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Hi, please help. I've gained 12 lbs in the 2 months since I had my gallbladder removed. Nothing has changed with my eating habits. I can't work out lime I used to due to hip issues. Would love some suggestions.

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  • Posted

    It's tough to exercise with hip problems. I have had same issue. Are you in severe pain mabe ask for tramadoltrama to help you keep movin or whatever the hip issue can it be repaired ? It's much better to contain pain issues and repair joints to releive the issues on the whole body and system. In the mean time cut out sugary drinks snacks. Change to healthy snacks and curb carbs . There are many great food ideas to help online with all the recepies . Keep it simple and I too need to loose my winter weight.and take my own alive stop with the sugars. It's a vicious circle when movin is difficult. Walking has helped me and drinking lots of water to help fill up and no foods after 8 Pm . 

    Wish you well on your journey. 

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    • Posted

      Thank you! I have actually had the opposite effect with the gallbladder surgery.  Instead of having to do to the bathroom after eating I can't go.  I've had to see a GI dr this past week and he prescribed me meds to get me moving.  I will try to do more walking to help out as well.

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  • Posted

    Sorry to hear you’re struggling with weight. This is what I have found- the hard way. I had the opposite - weight gain for no apparent reason in the months leading up to gallbladder attacks and struggling to keep weight down. During the attacks I lost a lot of weight eating a low fat diet. Since the surgery I’ve continued to lose weight slowly. I use an app called MyNetDiary to calorie count and I weigh/measure everything I eat at home. Many restaurants now state calories on menus but I’m careful in the choices I make. NHS have a useful BMI tool which even tells you how many calories to consume according to sex, height, weight and level of activity. I have recurrent issues with my lower back when I can’t walk far due to searing pain - my back just locks, so I have an idea of your problem. I do try to walk as much as possible, though the weather has been against it recently. At the moment I’m consuming around 1400 calories a day: breakfast 300, lunch 400, dinner 4-500 plus a couple of 100 calorie snacks. It’s not boring food. I’m in the uk and I keep a stock of Marks and Spencer Count on Us ready meals in, which are low fat, for emergencies. I never eat take away meals or fast food now, as they cause me pain. I use olive oil spray in cooking and have switched to lower fat spread, skimmed milk, 0% fat yogurt and reduced fat dressings. Frozen yogurt is a good substitute for ice cream. I also eat wholemeal bread and pasta and brown rice. I make skin on  ‘chips’ in the oven using spray oil but eat a lots of baked potatoes and baked beans. Baked potatoes, cut into wedges, sprayed with oil and crisped up in oven are delicious! Basically it’s a matter of balancing intake with output. If you’re inactive for any reason, you have to face up to not being able to eat as you’d like and that’s hard I know, especially when you’re recovering from gallbladder surgery and starting to get your appetite back. Just make up your mind to do it for yourself. Hope this helps. Good luck!
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    • Posted

      Thank you! I have actually had the opposite effect with the gallbladder surgery.  Instead of having to do to the bathroom after eating I can't go.  I've had to see a GI dr this past week and he prescribed me meds to get me moving.  I will try to do more walking to help out as well.

      Report
  • Posted

    You might ask your doctor to order an ultrasound to see if you have developed a fatty liver.  People who have fatty liver disease are unable to digest fat.  Instead, the liver starts storing it in itself and in the body.  

    Fatty liver disease is thought to be caused by the consumption of too much sugar, including high fructose corn syrup, which is in most commercially prepared low fat foods, to make them more palatable.  Try cutting back on sugar, and you can have healthy fats, which include butter from grass fed cows, milk from grass fed cows and beef from grass fed cows--just use these in moderation.  Best of luck to you!

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