What happens AFTER therapy.

Posted , 6 users are following.

I am currently at the very beginning of DBT group therapy for my MH issues. It has been explained to me it will be a 7 month long course of therapy and then a further 7 months to “reinforce” the learning.

So what is on my mind now is what happens AFTER those 14 months of therapy.

Over the years I’ve had talk therapy phycho therapy, CBT and your bog standard counselling, but DBT is pretty new to me. I know in my other treatment therapy once the course has run I would go back to weekly or fortnightly talk therapy to keep on top of things, but the majority of those therapies were in my younger teen years. I will be turning 24 by time my DBT is finished and I’m worried that after i have completed the 14 months I will be left to wing it myself. I can understand the point of DBT is to give you the skills to deal with your emotion regulation and all that but I am so anxious at the thought of being left with no support afterwards. Has anyone done DBT for borderline personality disorder and completed it and have any information on what “happens next”?

I probably shouldn’t be worrying about it as after all it is 14 months into the future but I am finding the transition from being a child receiving therapy and support to being an adult receiving it and as I am in the real world “an adult” I worry that this will cut short the amount of support and options offered. 

Thanks to anyone for reading and replying.

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10 Replies

  • Posted

    Hi Forestflower I would be interested to hear how you get on with this, I'm having a 121 assessment next week to see if I am accepted for group therapy for BPD/EUPD do not know how often, how long and what will happen afterwards, been waiting 9 months for this. My emotion regulation is getting more and more out of control and I should know better being in my 50's. 

    I'm sure the follow up support of 7 months after the course  will help you as in theory the therapy is suppose to help you with your emotion control so 14 months is quite a long time to learn these skills. think that makes sense.

    Good luck

    Tina

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    • Posted

      Thankyou for reading and replying tina. Sorry to hear you are struggling, it’s tough having emotions that are so uncontrollable and predictable.

      The wait for DBT I think is a long process in all areas, I myself had to wait 9 months to actually be seen off the waiting list from my referral, then a further 2 months after that I had an appointment with the consultant to discuss my issues and then do many tests and assessments and then after 6 months I have 4 appointments over the span of 3 months so a therapist could decide the best treatment for me, luckily enough I didn’t have to wait all that long to start my therapy which I started at the beginning of the month, there are people in my group that were waiting 3 years for this to happen but it can be a very irritating a anxious process.

      In my expierence so far of only 2 sessions I think it’s OK. I was totally against group therapy as I haven’t been in that kind of invironemt for 6 years since I left school and even then I was in a smaller pupil school with only 5 people per class as it was a school for people with MH.. so I was all over the place about going but I knew I had to bite the bullet.

      It’s bern good so far, I’m managing to block the other people out and just

      Focus on the therapist, it’s alot of mindfulll exersizes more than anything at the moment but I suppose it helps to ground you. 

      I’m hoping it’ll help, my mind frame already has turnt a little because I can actually attend it where as before In therapies of one to one I used to miss a lot through anxiety and that was only with me and one therapist so, so far so good. I really hope it has a positive outcome for you.

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    • Posted

      Hi Forestflower

      thank you for taking the time to reply and I am pleased to hear that you are finding it OK so far so that is a good thing? It is keeping the concentration and motivation that I will find hard.  I have had the one to one with the cpn who is taking it,she seemed ok there is likely to be 10 people in the group I'm still dreading it but starts on the 8th so not long to go. 

      that;s good that you are finding your anxiety is less and able to attend your sessions.so you keep up the good work.

      From what I remember her saying it starts with meditation exercises then discussions about your difficulties over the past week or you write it up on a board unsure as I has switched off by then and  how you tried or did overcome them, after that the next module. It will be opening up in front of people that I don't know or trust will be the problem but like you said I've got to bite the bullet too otherwise I will end up not being here.

      you keep those positive vibes and good luck for 2018.

      Tina

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  • Posted

    Unfortunately after I completed DBT it became the norm from all MH professionals to be telling me I have the skills get on with it and I have been discharged from services. 

    Their remit seems to be to give you what they feel you need and if it doesn’t work it’s your fault and they discharge with nothing else left to offer. 

    Thats just my experience. I know someone on my DBT course found it really helpful and she is much better and discharged herself because she didn’t feel she needed them. 

     I guess with everything it is individual and dependant on where you live and how stretched and under pressure they are to move people on. 

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    • Posted

      Thankyou for replying and I’m disgusted to hear that you have been thrown into the deep end with no float. That is my biggest fear on this journey, so I’m hoping I can absorb and embrace everything I’m taught so that I will be able to cope if that’s what they do at the end!!

      How did/are you coping with no support now?

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  • Posted

    I don't know for definite but I would say that if you have problems after that then re-attend your GP for more advice and assistance.  Also ask your therapist too to be certain.

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  • Posted

    The goal of therapy is take what you learn and apply it to your daily life when therapy is over. Facing uncertainty and facing the anxiety is very important after therapy is done.
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    • Posted

      See I understand that completely in a generalised way but for me personally I can understand and know all of what they teach and be unable to put it into action on my Own. I know the goal would be to allow me to get on with life with the knowlage provided but even still I’m not comfortable in the slightest with the possibility of being left with no support what so ever/:
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    • Posted

      Unfortunately, what you are describing is the really the goal of therapy and recovery. You have to trust in yourself and believe that you can manage things on your own. The OCD/Anxiety craves the reassurance and "safety" that supporters can provide for you, however it's not realistic to live this way.

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