What is the cause, opinions please

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I'd just be interested in others opinions on the cause of diverticulosis. I've always cooked from scratch, rarely eat what is termed as junk food and I love fruit and veg, so it was a shock not only to find I have this, but that it's severe, scarred and narrowed the bowel. I have had an inflamed gallbladder on and off for about ten years, but scans show I have no stones. Never had bottom left pain which is odd as that's the site with diverticuli, but do have pain top right which is where the gall bladder sits. Of course now I have pain all over the colon. They say it's caused by low fibre diet, but is it really because I've always had plenty of fibre in the foods I've eaten. Anyone out there got their own theories? Is it attached to having an inflammed gallbladder bladder, or does stress cause it? What do you think?

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  • Posted

    Im the  same as you Susan I don't and rarely ever did eat junk food but I did gulp my food if I was in a hurry and not digest it properly especially when I was working I would also sit at my desk and eat, as far as going to the loo if I was running late for work I would always wait and not go until I was in work which I now know isn't a good thing so in my opinion all of these things haven't helped and age is another factor im 67 now and had my first bout in April. My consultant told me that most of the population have diverticular  disease but only a small percentage have diverticulitis

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  • Posted

    This is a medical article I found.

    What causes diverticulosis and diverticulitis?

    Experts are not sure what causes diverticulosis and diverticulitis. Researchers are studying several factors that may play a role in causing these conditions.

    Fiber

    For more than 50 years, experts thought that following a low-fiber diet led to diverticulosis. However, recent research has found that a low-fiber diet may not play a role. This study also found that a high-fiber diet with more frequent bowel movements may be linked with a greater chance of having diverticulosis.

    Genes

    Some studies suggest that genes may make some people more likely to develop diverticulosis and diverticulitis. Experts are still studying the role genes play in causing these conditions.

    Other factors

    Studies have found links between diverticular disease—diverticulosis that causes symptoms or problems such as diverticular bleeding or diverticulitis—and the following factors:

    certain medicines—including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin , and steroids

    lack of exercise

    obesity

    smoking

    Diverticulitis may begin when bacteria or stool get caught in a pouch in your colon. A decrease in healthy bacteria and an increase in disease-causing bacteria in your colon may also lead to diverticulitis.

    A second article

    Your gut (intestine) moves stools (faeces) along with gentle squeezes of its muscular wall. The stools tend to be drier, smaller, and more difficult to move along if you don't eat much fibre. Your gut muscles have to work harder if there is too little fibre in your gut. High pressure may develop in parts of your gut when it squeezes hard stools. The increased pressure may push the inner lining of a small area of your gut through the muscle wall to form a small diverticulum. 

    I would add to that.  I've had high blood pressure since my early 20's - genetic not weight related, as over half my family had it.  Also I didn't chew my food properly.  However I've always drunk plenty of water and followed a mainly vegetable diet - I eat a little fish and poultry but rarely red meat.  We always had meals cooked from scratch - little processed food.

    So my conclusion is that there are multiple factors:  lack of fibre certainly in some cases, as nations with a high fibre, no processed food, do not have the same level of incidence, but also other predispositions.  I am from the post war generation where the diet was mostly vegetables, no junk food.  My cousin, who was born in the late 1920's also had this condition and he too had a high fibre, no processed food diet most of his life, but also had high blood pressure.  I am a non smoker but he smoked.  We both had weight problems from the 30's onwards. 

    So we both had some of the suspected factors.  But my genealogy research has revealed quite a few family members had bowel problems, resulting in the need for colostomy operations.

    I'm not a medical person so I can only think I'm the unlucky one in this generation!

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    • Posted

      Felinia, Thats very interesting. I'm a 50s born, but I have a normal low blood pressure of 90/60 ! I was a general nurse in the 70s at a well known London Teaching Hospital. I used to have lots of fainting episodes and, as being a nurse, I was rushed through every dept in the hospital trying to find the cause, it was like something out of a Carry On film. It was my sudden drop in blood pressure that caused it, but now I've learnt to live with it. I do have to be careful under GA and the anaesthetist has his work cut out with me. Even back in the ward post op I kept setting off the alarm on the monitor and an army of nurses and doctors would rush in thinking my heart had stopped. I did gulp my food down, so that seems to be a common denominator. These enzyme tablets seem to be kicking in and I feel more normal today. Tomorrow no food after lunch and first lot of gastrografin at 7pm. Can't wait for Friday now to get this Virtual CT out the way. Then my poor tummy can have some rest and recooperation.

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    • Posted

      The gastrographin was what I had.  I thought the first dose wasn't working, as nothing happened.  But I took the precaution of going to bed with pants and a sanitary pad on (at 67 I thought I'd finished with those 35 years ago lol!!).  The 2nd dose taken first thing in the morning got things moving, and I stayed in the loo with my Kindle, wet wipes, vaseline for my bottom, an old flannel and towels to wash myself.  Then I drove to the hospital with the precaution of another sanitary pad, and a stop at the loo in Tesco!!  But from parking to leaving was about 40 minutes.  As I said, I found the procedure painless, just a bit bloating.  The air was put in slowly and gently - I was not treated like a hot air balloon. 

      It will probably take some time for your bowels to get back to normal - they've had quite a bit of insult.  And you will pass a LOT of wind at first.  But I remember the cup of tea and roll I had straight afterwards was the best thing I'd ever eaten!  good luck

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    • Posted

      The instructions I have say take half the bottle at 7pm on Wednesday (last eats lunchtime Wednesday) and then the other half at 7pm on Thursday. I'm hoping this stuff isn't as aggressive as the picolax. Hardly got any sleep with that as on the loo most of the night, plus a thumping headache presumably from low blood/sugar levels. Then my appt is at 9.15am Friday. Yes it's lovely to have a nice cup of tea afterwards. Thanks for all your guidance and help, Sue

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    • Posted

      I found it much less aggresive than both Picolax and the other disgusting liquid I was given (senior moment - can't remember the name offhand).  You are made to wait longer than I did between doses - mine were only 12 hours apart.  6pm and 6am, with my appointment at 3.20pm.  If you are like me the first dose will have minimal effect.  But keep taking on plenty of fluids on the Thursday.  I remember I had lots of herbal teas and chicken consomme.  Do let us know how you get on - the more feedback, the better for every forum member.  Good luck

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  • Posted

    I have been suffering with an attack that has lasted for months now. I didn’t have rage lower left pain either but the pain is always in my right rib cage. I do have a gall stone but the doctors say I have diverticulitis. I’m waiting or an endoscopy. I was stupid today and ate a packet of chocolate buttons and have been in agony for hours with cramps, pain in my right rib cage and waiting to be sick as this pattern has happened before. Excuse my ignorance but you mentioned colon. Is pain from there similar to gallbladder pain?
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  • Posted

    Well it can be. The gallbladder can cause a cramp pain upper right and the Colon can give cramps pain in any part of the colon, just air that can't escape. Wind is second in the pain scale to childbirth apparently. Gallbladder pain can also be sharp if a stone has moved from the gallbladder and is obstructing the duct. Sometimes the stone moves back into the gallbladder again.

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  • Posted

    Thanks for your reply, Susan. You’ve reminded me of an incident seven years when I was in hospital with gallstone blocking the duct. Another patient was in with the same thing and she said the pain was worse than giving birth and she had had three children! Didn’t feel such a wimp after she said that! 

    Pas for me, I rang out of hours service at 4am and they said I maybe had a bug as well as diverticulitis. I saw my GP later and I have had a severe flare up plus norovirus. Yikes. She said pain in right rib cage is likely to be the colon. 

    Grateful for your reply, if was reassuring 🙂

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    • Posted

      It's awful isn't it? Bad enough having one illness at the time. Hope you feel better soon. It's actually a Godsend that I found this website because there's always someone who can steer you in the right direction.

      I'm having a virtual CT Colonoscopy on Friday and feeling hungry already, but no food now til it's done and the dreaded laxative to take soon. Problem is, it then takes ages for your colon to settle down again! So more pain to come.

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  • Posted

    It’s a godsend indeed, Susan. So helpful to find people who really understand and can give really useful advice.

    Good luck for Friday. Unpleasant, I know, but worth it to get results and find out what’s going on. Really think there should be an easier, less undignified way to find out 😢. Thanks for your support. 

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  • Posted

    My doctor told me that symptoms of diverticulae never pop up immediately. I was diagnosed with diverticulosis 7 months ago. My doctor told me that these diverticulae would have formed somewhat 10-12 years ago. He also told that one of the reason can be that in childhood if the person was many times suffering from stomach problem due to lumbricoides then such lumbricoides can also result into formation of diverticulae.
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