Where does the fluid go after you have the operation?

Posted , 5 users are following.

This discussion has been locked due to a period of inactivity. Start a new discussion

I am really concerned with what happens with all of this fluid after you have the operation. The protective sac is open so it cannot hold the fluid but what then.

Also this sac provides a protection and if it is opened it no longer provides this function and there is scar tissue which has to have some discomfort.

Does anyone have some answers .

0 likes, 8 replies

Report

8 Replies

  • Posted

    I saw a youtube video of a Hydrocele operation during the time I was scared to go.  I wanted to see exactly how the surgery went and what to expect. And from what I saw,  the fluid is suctioned out and discarded. From there, we are stitched up and sent home to heal. I'm 7 months out from my surgery. I had a little discomfort afterwards, but the medication helped a lot. I had to sleep on my back of course, change the dressing everyday because there was little blood. I had to wear a jock strap to keep the scrotum from moving around. Once the stitches dissolved and I was able to soak in water, I was on the way to healing. Now, I'm just waiting for the scrotum to return to normal size.

    Report
    • Posted

      I saw a video too. The operation took about 10 minutes or less. No big deal. But from what I have read here the fluid could build up again and some seem to have had the operation more than once. This is a concern to me. Also I talked to 2 doctors and none have said this operation does not mean I will not have the same prbolem after which also concerns me. The full facts are important and maybe just draining by needle  it is a better solution. The sack seems to provide a smooth linning for the testicle and with it removed the testicle would be rubbing against othe tissue not meant for the purpose. 
      Report
    • Posted

      This 'defect' is idiopathic. In other words it can't really be 'cured' because they don't really know what causes it. There's no real way of telling who's body will form cysts. A hydrocele is really an example of your body's natural defense working perfectly - spots something foreign, walls it off.

      The thing you're concerned about is 'why is excess fluid accumulating?' Again there's no REAL way of anticipating this--if you are eating well and exercising, your body is most likely best equipped to be able to deal with re absorption rates (but even that isn't all there is to it).

      Lastly, your testicle was likely there without the cyst sack to begin with, so I'm sure the friction isn't an issue here wink

      Report
  • Posted

    They remove the entire sac to reduce the chance of re-occurance. The extent of the internal scar tissue is dependant on how extensive the hydrocele is. I haven't read or heard about any major discomfort related to this scar tissue after swelling and healing has finished. 

    I had what is called a "communicating hydrocele" which means it had started to develop upward, toward the abdomen, so I had more internal scar tissue than normal. After healing, I can feel it a little when I touch that area of the scrotum, but I haven't had any major discomfort or pain associated with it.

    There has been indication from some posts here about suturing the testical to the wall of the scrotum, but I have never read about this practice nor did my surgeon ever indicate that this would be done during my surgery as it wasn't.

    Good Luck!

    Report
    • Posted

      Meh... the suturing of the the testicle to the scrotum happens, it's just unclear if it does any real good--it may help countering the contraction of tissue during healing (in effort to not 'short-sheet' you, so to speak), but it's basically voodoo medicine and doesn't likely do anything quantifiable.

      Report
  • Posted

    The fluid is re absorbed, as it should have been from the beginning. Unfortunately that's not always the case.

    The fluid that accumulates is called interstitial fluid and is always present throughout your body.

    The defect here, is that the fluid is not being re absorbed and, therefore, is walled off by your body, creating a cyst.

    Clinicians call it mostly idiopathic (a defect without any clear cause). The degree of 'protection received from the cyst' that you're concerned about losing does not apply to this physiology - the body sites the accumulation of fluid as foreign, then walls it off.

    However, assuming the cyst is benign (not cancerous), the fluid is completely natural to your body and doesn't threaten your system in the least. (Hydrocelectomy is deemed an elective procedure because of this)

    The fibrosis (scar tissue formation) is always somewhat uncomfortable.

    Think about a scab : cells proliferate; fibrin is added and it contracts the edges of tissue together until the scab is gone. Best description is a sensation of 'tightness'.

    The same is generally true for hydroceles (or any other tissue defect, for that matter).

    However, the reality is that you'll be more aware of the swelling than the fibrosis (scarring) of the tissues--noci-receptors (pain) are not typically located in these particular tissues. Also, remember that the swelling is completely natural, as your body rushes nutrient rich, specialized fluid (like blood cells (red and white), plasma, and MORE interstitial fluid) to aid in healing.

    Report
  • Posted

    Hi, I gather you are talking about the sac that surronds your testicle? I was told that the water is held in another sac that surrounds the one that envelopes your testicle.

    The specialist told me that the operation consists of opening the scrotum, and removing the contents, the sac which is seperate from the testical sac is drained and removed just leaving the neck which is stitched closed. I have had this done 3 times and can feel the neck of the water sac which they say will remain. I believe in America the sack can be sealed from the inside with a gel but not certain.

     

    Report
  • Posted

    You say you had it done 3 time. Are you saying you have not resolved the problem
    Report

Join this discussion or start a new one?

New discussion

Report as inappropriate

Thanks for your help!

We want the forums to be a useful resource for our users but it is important to remember that the forums are not moderated or reviewed by doctors and so you should not rely on opinions or advice given by other users in respect of any healthcare matters. Always speak to your doctor before acting and in cases of emergency seek appropriate medical assistance immediately. Use of the forums is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and steps will be taken to remove posts identified as being in breach of those terms.

newnav-down newnav-up