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Hi everyone, I am in Adelaide Australia and have had an under active thyroid for 15 years managed very well until recent surgery. TSH has now dropped dramatically although T4 normal, no T3 results. Unfortunately my GP retired and I am not confident the new GP understands the complexity of hypothyroidism. I have been to see two different doctors who specialise in thyroid disorders. One said to keep taking an increased dosage of thyroxin the other says he can fix me by giving me bio identical hormones (HRT) and putting me on a metabolic diet. I'm not happy with either of those solutions. I am going to ask my GP for yet another referral to an endocrinologist. I am curious as to whom other people have found most useful? I find the doctors I have seen have a narrow focus whereas I believe I need someone who can see the whole picture. For example no one has ever suggested there could be a link between vitamin D and thyroid or adrenal  fatigue and thyroid. Any feedback greatly appreciated. smile 

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  • Posted

    Hi

    I have had my thyroid removed in the last year and as I live in Scotland with our weather I was advised to take Vit D.  Reading posts from others it seems that it might be connected to a thyroid disorders. 

    I have learned a lot on this site about how to manage the symptoms and you will find that people who have a great deal of knowledge on this subject will advise you and no doubt be in contact soon.

    have a good day smile

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  • Posted

    Hi. I believe there is a link as you say - the whole endocrine system is complex and I don't think a narrow focus will help either. Boosting your entire body with the minerals it craves I think is a good route to health rather than the established medical practice of dealing with individual symptoms as they come up. Our bodies function synergistically and one system relies on the next to support its function. I'd look into raw veg and fruit juicing as a nutritionist suggested to me. My research online has come up with how vital magnesium zinc iodine and selenium are for instance- of which magnesium is deeply undervalued at the moment - and none of which appears on the ingredients list of medicines from the Dr or endocrinologist. I also recently read an article that states the recommended daily dose of vitamin D is actually much too low to give the body adequate support. Hope this helps.
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    • Posted

      Hi Leigh, I agree with what you say about the minerals and I asked the doctor about taking nutritional supplements but he said they wouldn't do any good. I don't actually think that's correct  but am unsure how much to take of each one, or even which ones to take. A naturopath has told me a lot of vitamins and minerals we buy over the counter are often not absorbable in that form. I'm currently taking zinc and was taking Vit B but naturopath said I was wasting my time with that so have stopped taking it. 
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    • Posted

      Hi. Google magnesium deficiency symptoms and see what it comes up with. - It's ridiculous of your doctor to tell you that mineral supplements won't do you any good - doctors get about three hours training on nutrition - and our bodies need minerals or we would die without them ! If the naturopathic physician could tell you what you shouldn't take thenperhaps they could suggest what you should be taking. ? I would have thought that was their job.
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  • Posted

    Hi,  My situation may be similar to yours.  You do not say what kind of operation you had but if it was any kind of gastric op. I would suspect that you could have the sort of problems you are now encountering with the GP.  I had half my thyroid gland removed in 1986 and was put on 100mcg Oroxine and was fine for 27 years.

    I am living in NSW Australia, in 2010 I had a right hemicolectomy to remove the right side of my colon due to bowel cancer.  This also included the removal of the ileocecal valve (which connects small bowel to colon).  After the operation my recovery was normal but over the coming months I felt that I was not quite myself but did not think too much about it after such a large operation.

    My regular yearly thyroid function tests had been missed for two years due to being busy with recovery from the op and a small amount of chemo. 

    The next thyroid function test was done in 2013 and the TSH was 0.08 which was a drop from the usual 0.68.  The doctor insisted that my dose of Oroxine should drop to 75mcg.  I asked to be referred to an Endocrinologist who told me that he agreed with the drop in medication.  When I told him that I did not feel good on this dose after second visit he told me that I would be thanking him in about six months and that this would be right for me.  In six months time I felt like I had one foot in the grave.  No exageration!  I was freezing cold and very sick - I took my temperature thinking that it must be raised for me to feel this bad .. but got a shock when it was 35.8 .. later dropped to 35.2.  I dragged myself to the computer and started googling .. discovered that I was in a very hypo state.

    I was taken to the GP and another blood test was ordered - TSH 2.4  I told the doctor (a different one) that I was putting the meds up again .. and I did.  Since then I have adjusted the Oroxine up again .. I take 100mcg five days a week and 125mcg Saturday and 125mcg Sunday.  The reason for raising of the medication was figured out by my colorectal surgeon who did the op.  She said that the medication was going through my system too fast due to the removal of the ileocecal valve.  She suggested that I should increase the dose and see if I feel better - and I do.   

    If your T4 is normal and you feel ok then that is the main thing.  TSH is unreliable but GP's rely heavily on it for diagnosing.  It's up to you to manage your health and speak up for what you think is right when it comes to thyroid matters.  Do not let doctors change your medication based on TSH alone.  

    BTW I have been taking HRT for eleven years and it's great.  It has nothing to do with the problems I have mentioned above.

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    • Posted

      Hi sketchy, I had a hysterectomy and first sign something other than postop recovery was wrong was the bucket loads of hair I started losing. My TSH dropped from 2.68 to 0.03. T4 normal but no T3 reading taken. I have been for another blood test this week and get the results tomorrow from the doctor who wants me to take HRT to fix it all up. I feel better than I did 2 months ago but still don't feel right. I was taking 100mcg each day

      with an extra 50mcg three times a week. Now I am taking 150mcg every

      day. I would much prefer to be on the lesser dose. 

      Lucky you had a surgeon who was switched on! Sounds like you were in desperate straits! Hope you're feeling much better. 

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    • Posted

      Hi Carolann, So I see that it was a hysterectomy that caused your troubles.  You have been on Thyroxine for quite a while and you know what normal feels like so I feel you will eventually get back to that with some tweaking. 

      Just thought I would mention about the HRT to you.  I originally went on it because of relentless hot flushes 24/7 and thinning of hair.  It fixed the hot flush problem within about two weeks but did not do too much for the thinning hair.  Iron is the thing that fixed the hair problem.  In your case if you have had ovaries removed I would think that it would be best to replace the missing hormones.  

      I have been taking Premia 2.5 continuous since 2001 and I can't come off it because the flushes return again.  But I don't want to stop it as it has been so good for me.  I feel well and I have no arthritis anywhere in my body - I am 68.  My friends (not on HRT) of the same age are struggling with arthritis and are turning into little old ladies.  They have tried HRT but could not continue with it for one reason or another - it does'nt suit everyone.  I tried the bio-identical HRT for six months - it was expensive and it stopped working after six months so I went back to my Premia.  The Premia also comes in a higher dose Premia 5 continuous which has more progesterone in it.

      Hope you get it successfully sorted in time ..

       

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    • Posted

      Hi Sketchy, I have just got back from doctor and he has recommended again I take the bio identical hormones and I will start feeling much better. I didn't take HRT when going through menopause (I'm 65) because my symptoms weren't that dramatic. In fact I would say the worse thing to happen at menopause was my thyroid becoming under active. To me the  two issues aren't related - take hormones for the sake of general health and wellbeing  but also take action to get my thyroid working well again. I dint have a problem with thyroid management until after the hysterectomy. One doctor I have seen said the thyroid will likely just sort itself out again with time and maybe that's what will happen. I am so confused by it all! 
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