Work full time -have rheumatoid arthritis

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Work full time fab employers but have rheumatoid arthritis in both knees and severe disc and sciatica. They have made all necessary adjustments for me with regards to equipment etc but I have been advised to apply for benefits to help with my mobility for a car. I don't know where to start. I want to keep my independence and continue to work but I need help .

Thank you

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10 Replies

  • Posted

    Hi presuming you are under state pension age and in the UK you need to apply for PIP (personal independance payment).  There is a middle rate and higher rate for both care and mobility and whether or not you get them will depend not on your illness but how it affects you.   This is extra money and not usually taxed.   

    For how to apply look on the site - direct.gov.uk and this will tell you. 

    If you already have a car then you might be entitled to a blue badge so you can park free or at a refuced fee in some places,  and in the disabled spaces.  To apply contact your local council.  Good luck with it.  x

     

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  • Posted

    Hi, the best one to give you the best advice is les59996 he's very knowledgable in mobility cars ,take care and good luck 
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    • Posted

      Agree 100%.

      Les knows LOADS.

      Hopefully he will see this and advise you.

      In the mean time good luck and best wishes xxx

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  • Posted

    Hi, there are two choices you have with needing a car. You buy one yourself out of general income or savings or apply for PIP.

    For PIP you will have to show why and for what reason you cannot walk/move more than 20 metres or be treated as unable.

    This is a hard test to pass so plenty of backing evidence is required.

    Having said that if you did manage to receive the enhanced rate for mobility, you will no doubt have to have re-assessments (making new claims as though they are the first). There is no guarantee that you would be re-awarded PIP at any of these re-assessments so the mobility car would have to go back until you win the appeal and then you can apply for another mobility car.

    Unlike DLA, when you could get High Rate mobility indefinitely, PIP is geared to making you prove every time that the award you seek is what they should give you.

    Many others will give you more info on how to make the PIP claim - I'm off to bed now and didn't want to ignore you.

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  • Posted

    Hi cooky16311,

    Picking up from les in reference to the mobility awards. To get the maximum 12 points needed for a mobility vehicle you need to prove that you cannot walk more than 20 metres"within a certain timescale, without unnecassary discomfort or pain and repeatedly". I know there are several ways to interperate their guidance, probably down to luck on the day, so rediculous. There are reports on this site that as soon as you walk to the assessment centre front door everything is measured and furniture etc. put in the way to see how you get around them. Interestingly distance is measured in yards and miles in this country, councils are not allowed to put "metres" only on road signs. Also what ever you do in an assessment centre Never sit still, stand up, look uncomfortable and in pain. If your not uncomfortable and in pain you probably shouldn't be there.

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    • Posted

      Also what ever you do in an assessment centre Never sit still, stand up, look uncomfortable and in pain. If your not uncomfortable and in pain you probably shouldn't be there.

      Play acting in any form is wrong, it could lead to an award being given that you aren't entitled to - which could lead to a criminal prosecution for benefit fraud.

      If you are uncomfortable sitting down and much better standing up, tell the assessor how you are feeling. In my assessments (ESA & DLA) I was up and down like a yoyo!

      If you are in pain, it will show, trying to make yourself appear to be in pain is a no no.

      You shouldn't be there....?? Of course you should unless there is a vary good reason backed up with medical evidence to say that. They would then do a home visit.

       

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  • Posted

    Hi cooky16311,

    I must leave very large gaps between my lines, people can read much more than is there!!!

    It is a well known trait for many in this country to have a "stiff upper lip", or" put a brave face on". I was not telling ANYONE to play act or tell untruthes. I also added the word "probably", in the sentence which drastically changes the content.

    You may be in mental pain but that would not mean you were uncomfortable sitting or standing. I want people to understand that they are being tested continuously while under observation in these centres and you do yourself no favours if you do "put a brave face on".

    Wake up and smell the coffee.

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    • Posted

      Not really, I was quoting word for word what you said.

      To me that is a statement advising people what to do - NEVER sit still.....LOOK uncomfortable and in PAIN.

      If you aren't able to sit still tell the assessor and explain why. If you are uncomfortable tell the assessor and explain why. If you are in pain tell the assessor and explain why.

      If these are genuine, then it will come naturally to discuss the problem with the assessor. No one needs to pretend, play act or exagerate anything,

      If they aren't as genuine as you attempt to make out you are - that is wrong and illegal.

       Using the word probably in the way you did only refers to fact of being at the assessment in the first place. If the truth is always told, then only those that are genuinely disabled would be at the assessment.

      Enough.It is clear that your suggestion is to embelish everything on the basis that if the assessor sees the real you an award would not be made.

      I fail to understand why someone would want to try to make sure that they looked sick and disabled - the true facts and indisputable evidence submitted would speak volumes anyhow. Does it really matter what the assessor sees if there is no element of exaggeration or understatement involved? You are what you are and here is the evidence that backs up everything that has been claimed.

       

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    • Posted

      Don't worry Mike no need to leave a large gaps between your lines it's les I think he need to  write a smaller paragraphs , and play time is over les .its time for bed good night and sweet dreams. We need you fresh in a morning for more advice.
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    • Posted

      Yes it nearly is bedtime!

      No seriously I was only trying to point out that other posters might have been swayed into thinking that Mike's opinion is right which would have led others into serious trouble in the future if they followed it.

      It is always best to tell the truth in these assessments and be yourself  - no exaggerations or understatements either.

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