16 year old grandson with heart problem

Posted , 6 users are following.

This discussion has been locked due to a period of inactivity. Start a new discussion

My very athletic 16 year old grandson had a heart scan (c.r.y. funded at his football club) which showed that his electric transmitters in his heart weren't working properly. He is seeing a cardiologist in two weeks and until then has been told not to take part in any exercise. Can anyone tell me what we can expect? It was such a shock as he is so active.

0 likes, 19 replies

Report

19 Replies

Next
  • Posted

    C.R.Y. is cardiac risk for the young. If there should be a problem he is fortunate that his club get their players tested. Is there a heart disease history in his immediate family? Someone I know was called back after having Well Man tests and his suspicious reading was caused by having been given two cups of coffee while waiting for the late arriving doctor.

    The CRY site says:

    Screening for cardiac diseases can be a complex situation but we are trying to adopt a cost effective screening programme and this screening programme comprises of a health questionnaire which enquires specifically about the cardinal symptoms of cardiac diseases such as chest pain, breathlessness, dizziness, palpitations or black outs and also importantly enquires about family history of cardiac conditions, because most conditions that cause sudden death in young people are hereditary – by that I mean they are genetically transmitted from one person to another so the family history's very important.

    That is usually followed by a 12 lead ECG which is an electrical tracing of the heart that is designed to look for electrical faults of the heart and to raise suspicion of the cardiomyopathies. So the whole process doesn't take long and in many situations, the individual can be reassured on the spot, a small number of people, I would say 4%, need further tests. Of these 4%, 0.2% have a serious problem, about 1% have a minor problem and the other 2.8% can be reassured.

     

    Report
    • Posted

      Thank you so much for replying. His great grandmother had high blood pressure, myself and my husband (his grandparents) take statins for raised cholesterol, his father has a heart murmur (although the army were happy to employ him and send him to Iraq!) All questions that were asked before his scan. I'm guessing that his football playing is over, which will devastate him - he has just been nominated for an award. I'm so worried for him.

      Report
    • Posted

      None of your minor family cardiac problems would present a danger to him. They would only be interested in direct family who died suddenly. As the stats from the CRY site said it is a very small proportion of ones called back who have risk factors.

      Everyone has to cover their backs nowadays hence the no exercise directive. In 2001I  had a stress ECG (Treadmill test) and asked how it compared to a previous one that it turned out he did not have a record of. When he got it he said it was much worse and that I needed to stay to have an angiogram the next day and probably an angioplasty. I said that I would go home and get my overnight things and he refused saying that I might fall down dead at the bus stop!

      I offered to bet him a moths wages that they would find nothing wrong but he refused the bet. I had the angiogram and they said, Sorry it was a false positive but that I did have a slight murmur.   

      Report
  • Posted

    I am sending you both a big hug, I have an 18 year old who luckily is ok, CRY came into his school and we paid for a check as he rows and we wanted to make sure.  I doubt that his football days are over, I would think this is just a precaution, they say that exercise keeps your heart healthy so to actually exercise not sit still.  Good luck for the appointment and hope all it well.
    Report
    • Posted

      Thank you so much. We're waiting for an appointment for a cardiac treadmill stress test. It's the waiting that's hard.

      Report
    • Posted

      It certainly is, try not to worry, easier said than done. I have been having lots of funnies with my heart over the past couple of years and have had many tests, some show things which eventually turn out to be nothing, my stress test showed a false positive, I seem to get a lot of those. My cardio said that we all have different heart patterns so hopefully it will be something that can be sorted quickly.  
      Report
    • Posted

      Thank you for your comments. We worry so much about our grandchildren don't we? I've had cancer and a brain tumour treatment in the last two years but worry more about my grandchildren, his 13 year old sister is autistic. Plus my husband had major surgery 8 months ago for a perforated bowel and has to have two major operations in the new year! I don't know who to worry about first!

      Report
    • Posted

      Oh no, what a lot to worry about, makes my age related moans see trivial. Yes, we do worry, I am 58 and have an 18 year old in his first year at Uni, he is our only one and we miss him dreadfully as he is so far away, we are Bedfordshire, he is in Durham and I worry about him eating, sleeping, falling in the river when he rows, getting hurt on a night out etc etc, not sure how I would cope if I had your problems, hope everything is ok with you now.  All I can say is be positive both for your grandson and husband and hope you enjoy Christmas.  Let us know how things go with the cardio.  Take care x
      Report
    • Posted

      If they thought it urgent you would get the treadmill test practically right away. I once had one after going being sent to the chest pain clinic by my doctor. The other time it was four days later. Each produced a false positive. 
      Report
    • Posted

      The problem that we have is this. The charity C.R.Y. funded the initial routine tests, E.C.G. and ultrasound. They then instructed his G.P. to get blood tests done. He would then be referred to a local hospital for treadmill stress test. Blood tests were done, came back clear but we're given to the wrong G.P. at our surgery. Instead of this doctor finding out why these tests had been requested he saw that they had come back clear so wrote on them "no further action required"! It was only because my daughter rang the surgery to chase them up that the mistake was found. Of course that has delayed matters so now we must wait for the correct doctor to look at them and make a referral for the treadmill test! N.H.S. don't seem to do urgency.

      Report
    • Posted

      My two earlier examples were my best ones. The worst one was when I had been diagnosed with aortic stenosis at Imperial College and referred back to my local GP to save me the long journeys to London.

      It was a five week wait to see a cardiologist who then wanted me to have a stress echocardiogram. That was a 19 week wait and I had managed to get a cancellation.

      I won't go into the chaos that followed but it took seven more months before getting my aortic valve replaced. 

      Report
    • Posted

      I feel your pain. When my G.P. referred me to have a suspicious lump examined the waiting list was so long we used my husband's medical insurance through his job to get a diagnosis. Good job we did, I had stage 1 lymphoma of the aggressive variety which we only managed to catch in time due to an early diagnosis.

      Report
    • Posted

      I had a six month wait to see a neurologist. He did not find a problem and referred me to neuro surgeon. That was to be a 42 week wait so I had to go privately. 

      My wife was on a six month wait to see a neurologist they changed the date to a month later. This week it has been cancelled to unforeseen circumstances without being given another date. 

      Report
    • Posted

      That is after they have killed us off:-). So many people going private now their waiting list are getting longer.
      Report

Join this discussion or start a new one?

New discussion

Report as inappropriate

Thanks for your help!

We want the forums to be a useful resource for our users but it is important to remember that the forums are not moderated or reviewed by doctors and so you should not rely on opinions or advice given by other users in respect of any healthcare matters. Always speak to your doctor before acting and in cases of emergency seek appropriate medical assistance immediately. Use of the forums is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and steps will be taken to remove posts identified as being in breach of those terms.

newnav-down newnav-up