Appointment with my Neuro( 2007)

Posted , 5 users are following.

Hiya smile

Thought I'd post the results of my meeting with my neuro prior to my op in July 2007.

It says in the letter:

The scan clearly shows compression on the cord at C3/4 and at C5/6 and 6/7 levels.

I put it to Mrs M that there is a reasonable probability of deterioration of her cord function if nothing is done.

I have explained that surgery is designed to relive pressure on the spinal cord and in so doing, protect it from risk of deurological damage in the future. We know from studies of patients who have undergone this type of operation that 60-70% show a degree of neurological improvment although this cannot be guaranteed. It is most unlikely that the recovery will allow a patient to revert completely to normal, On the other hand, the earlier the cord is relived of pressure, the better the neurological outcome.

I have explained that as ythe C3/4 and lower parts of her cervical spine are effected and anterior (front) op is inappropiate and the problem should be dealt with by a cervical laminectomy.

Em smile

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  • Posted

    Hi Em'

    Just thought I'd enquire if you know what might have caused the initial injury or was it something which appeared gradually with no apparent cause? After much reflection, I came to the conclusion that mine was caused in car crash when I was 8 years old....but it's a guess. Also interested to know how you evaluate the op in terms of success ?

    Gerry

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  • Posted

    hi gerry it is interesting that you realise that your cs could have been set off by an accident when you were 8yrs old. i had the same thought, i was knocked down when i was 13 and although nothing was broke, i had nothing but problems from that day on. when i had my initial appointment with the physiotherapist he asked if i had been in a bad accident, i told him the only accident i had been involved in was the car accident when i was 13. he continued to tell me that my INJURIES were the same as a whiplash working it's way up my spine, culminating in my cs. i have problems from c2 to c7. so gerry if you can shine a light on what affects what from which cervical section i would appreciate it.(if that makes sense)
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  • Posted

    Hi Chris,

    Know what you mean when you say \"problems from that day on\". I've always felt like that. My injuries are to 4/5/6 vertebrae and I feel I'm familiar with associated problems . If the injuries involved lower vertebrae, then, I'm sure, there would be much greater radiated symptoms throughout the upper body but I can't justify commenting on this because my experience of these aches/pains is ocassional. Similarly for any injury higher up the neck, as this might lead to more constant headaches than I experience.

    The story of the 'crash' is probably worth describing. My Mum, two sisters and me were walking home from visiting friends, when there was an almighty downpour. We were stood at a bus stop, getting soaked, when a car pulled over and the driver asked if we wanted a lift (nice thought, and my mum was a bit of a looker as well). We got in, my older sister and me in the back seat ( 1960..black Ford Anglia) and off we went. He was so busy talking to my mum he didn't see the red light and we ploughed into the side of a crossing lorry. Luckilly we hit the wheel...so didn't go under. Speed probably 25/30mph. My sister and I were both flung against the backs of the front seats. I remember hitting my chest really hard and crumpling. I don't remember hitting my head (but what's new). Anyway, we all went to the doctors immediately and were treated for bruises etc. No mention of xrays or suing in those days, and carried on as though there was no serious damage.

    This is the only incident in my youth which might have caused what I've now got and like you say \"from that day on\" things were different for me. Trouble was that, as a kid, I had nothing to compare it with and just assumed how I felt was normal. Nowadays, You would be examined more thoroughly and have a team of lawyers on their toes!

    Gerry

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  • Posted

    Thank you, Gerry and Chris, for saying that your current problems were set off when you were children. I subscribe to the \"problems from that day on\" notion although, in my case, I believe it stems for an operation when I was 5 rather than an accident. I had a lumbar puncture as part of treatment for viral meningitis. A couple of meningitis charities have told me recently that this is now regarded as a risky procedure for young children but I wonder if my parents were told this in 1962. They're both dead now so I can't ask them. Visits to and occasional stays in various hospitals during my school years are a particular memory although the reasons are not always clear to me 40+ years later. I can remember suffering from back pain which was always dismissed as was the occasional very stiff neck. Now, when doctors ask if I've had any serious illness, I always mention meningitis. But that's always dismissed as being \"too long ago\". My opinion is that what has now been diagnosed as CS had been slowly developing from that time and was aggravated by some physiotherapy in the mid-1990s. Quite how this relates to your experiences, I'm not sure but it's interesting that we're thinking along similar lines.
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  • Posted

    Hiya Gerry, Chris, idk, smile

    I believe my CS is genetic, (throwing a spanner in the works here) my late father, my brother, and various cousins have all got CS.

    Having said all that, I have had heavy jobs all my working life, I wouldn't be allowed to do half of what I did.

    The only thing I emember about the onset of this, is.... I was painting outside and reaching up, when crunch, something went in my neck, thought I'd pulled a muscle, and thought nothing of it, until a couple of days later, the pain was awful, I felt as though I was being dragged to the floor, had dizziness and couldn,t walk in a straight line :roll:

    How do I evaluate the op ? Firstly, it was a hard decision to make, my brother had had it 4 years earlier and his op had failed sad He struggles daily, his favourite saying is.... \"You can't legislate, from day to day how you will feel\" how true!! smile Anyway I believe the op has been a sucess for me, bearing in mind I was only some 16 months into the condition. So my chances werebetter than my brothers fortunatly. I have the use of my arms and hands back, the pain is still there, but I'm hopeful it will drift into the woodwork one day.

    There are some excellent links on this site, follow from Patient+ and read about whiplash and cs

    http://experience.patient.co.uk/viewtopic.php?t=11532

    It may not let me put this link here

    Em :D

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  • Posted

    Just an add-on here.

    For anyone contemplating having this op, be prepared for a very painful event, I was warned at my pre-op appointment) you do absolutley nothing for 8 weeks, and then it can take anything 12-24 months for things to settle down.

    Em smile

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  • Posted

    Hi,

    Another theory emanating from the above. I think I'm beginning to see c/s in two ways now.

    Injury Based Spondylosis....IBS (okay...I know!), where an injury, in repairing itself, develops as spondylosis of the damaged area...and is localised with referred symptoms.

    Arthritic Based Spondylosis....ABS ( yes...I know), where there is an underlying arthritic condition which weakens the bone structure and causes resultant spondylosis. This occurs on a continuous degenerative basis and gives rise to gradually worsening referred symptoms.

    IBS: Injury has occured just once. However, bad management can lead to occassional aggravation and the process repeating itself intermittently. The actual repaired ( or over-repaired ) vertebrae should stabilise and not cause too many referred symptoms if managed properly. The process is not neccessarily degenerative in the sense that it need not worsen if cared for properly. It is a mechanical problem.

    ABS: Requires a completely different remedial approach designed for arthritic conditions. These might involve diets, supplements, oils etc, to help counteract the cause i.e. bone deficiency. Good management, as with injury based, may also yield results but, because of it's degenerative nature, would not be enough.

    Both varieties show a similarity of symptoms, although possibly on a differing scale of range and intensity. Thus the varying descriptions from members and guests here. I'm beginning to wonder if Injury Based should even be classified as 'spondylosis, as the term implies a continual degeneration, which I don't believe is true in my case. Throw the two together and it's not difficult to see where the confusions in diagnosis and treatments might occur.

    I was diagnosed in 1981 and was told it was a degenerative condition. Basically, I expected it to be a lot worse by now. It isn't, really. I manage it better and get less headaches. The only deterioration has been age-related really, and I'm more inclined to not try to prove to myself that it's surmountable as a problem......more time to think!!

    When I read the c/s posts here, I do notice that some descriptions suggest almost total disablement whilst some, like mine, suggest a semi-functionalism ( or semi + functionalism ) and I don't think we should all be visualising the worst long term scenario and considering the more invasive therapies (injections, surgery ) which, unfortunately, those with a more serious grade c/s must consider.

    No need to mention here who the real heroes and heroines of c/s are.

    Gerry

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  • Posted

    Hiya, smile

    I think I'm starting to think likewise Gerry, CS could be and probably is a broad based diagnosis.

    I was diagnosed with CS + stenosis +myelopathy.(My brother has stenosis + myelopathy, we both had multi-level laminectomies)

    I also believe I am pre-disposed because of the strong genetic link.

    My Rheumy doc told me lots of people are born with a narrow spinal canal and don't know.

    The above could be why some people are in more pain than others.

    I have read reports, whereby it has been reported that clinical findings suggest that many people have CS but have no symptoms and others have mild to severe symptoms.

    Over to you

    Em smile

    Has anyone else here have, family members who complain of neck,back,shoulder, arm or hand pain. Even arthritis ?

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  • Posted

    hi aunty em and gerry, i seem to have an accumulation of both possibilities. i have a congenital fusion of c4/c5, and also due to the car accident, i have injuries. i am not as fluent in my explanations as you both, so i cant explain myself as easy. since my medical report 13 yrs ago i havent had any more examinations, so i dont know how i am progressing. i do know that the pain comes in waves, and stress is a big factor. i generally have pains in the right side of my neck that radiate down my arm, i also have pains that go from my neck up into my head as if someone is stabbing me with a knitting needle. i have days were i cant move my neck at all, or my arm , typing is the cause of a lot of my pain, so thankfully it is for pleasure and not work. at the moment i am struggling with a pair of frozen shoulders so all told from the waist up i am snookered.
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  • Posted

    Hiya Chris,

    I apologise if I'm sounding bossy here, I'm not, I'm concerned that you are suffering so much. As one Middletonion to another :D please ask your Gp to refer you to [color=orange:efbdf134bf]XXXXXXX[/color:efbdf134bf], Consultant Rheumatologist at Rochdale Infirmary, he is the man to see, he's brilliant( probably shouldn't be doing this :roll: ) If your GP won't refer you, change your doc if you're not happy.

    Thinking about what you are saying Chris, re congenital, could this be genetic? Have you any other rellies with CS, Arthritis??

    Take Care Bud

    Em smile

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    [size=9:efbdf134bf](Sorry but Patient Admin have removed either a telephone number, name, an email address, and or web address, from this posting, as it is the policy of Patient UK not to publish these on this forum.

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  • Posted

    Took me three whole days to figure out what 'rellies' referred to! Us southern gentry only use the Queen's english and it might have sounded offensive to request an explanation, or indeed, display an ignorance of northern dialects! smile Rest assured, my ignorance will remain intact!

    I have plenty 'relatives' , lots of back problems, but none with anything like c/s. I know the question wasn't for me but thought I'd say anyway.

    Gerry

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  • Posted

    Hiya Gerry, :lol:

    Hope you have a good sense of humour today :lol:

    Re Southern Jessies, :lol: OOps sorry I mean southern gentry and the Queens english, load of codswallop! smile Let me know if you need help working that one out :lol: It is also well documented that Northern Humour is so much better than southern humour, that we never feel offended, we're that thick it bounces clean off us :lol: :lol:

    The question was really for everyone and anyone. :wink:

    Emxx :lol:

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  • Posted

    hi aunty em, thanks for your concern, i am used to all this palaver. my mum has general arthritis, but no-one that i know of in my family has it this bad. i have tried my docs and all they say is that i should be glad i dont have it worse and there is no point to refer me to the hospital as it is progressive and nothing that they can do. so i am stuck,i have seen someone at highfield hospital(its a bupa hospital, just before you get to rochdale). also someone from st james' ,leeds. they are of the opinion that an op would make things worse and suggested pain releif instead, which i have had in spades. i have been under two different surgeries(gp practices, for you southerners) and there hasnt been much help from either.
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  • Posted

    [quote:901f491880=\"Gerry the neck\"]Hi,

    Another theory emanating from the above. I think I'm beginning to see c/s in two ways now.

    Injury Based Spondylosis....IBS (okay...I know!), where an injury, in repairing itself, develops as spondylosis of the damaged area...and is localised with referred symptoms.

    Arthritic Based Spondylosis....ABS ( yes...I know), where there is an underlying arthritic condition which weakens the bone structure and causes resultant spondylosis. This occurs on a continuous degenerative basis and gives rise to gradually worsening referred symptoms.

    IBS: Injury has occured just once. However, bad management can lead to occassional aggravation and the process repeating itself intermittently. The actual repaired ( or over-repaired ) vertebrae should stabilise and not cause too many referred symptoms if managed properly. The process is not neccessarily degenerative in the sense that it need not worsen if cared for properly. It is a mechanical problem.

    ABS: Requires a completely different remedial approach designed for arthritic conditions. These might involve diets, supplements, oils etc, to help counteract the cause i.e. bone deficiency. Good management, as with injury based, may also yield results but, because of it's degenerative nature, would not be enough.

    Both varieties show a similarity of symptoms, although possibly on a differing scale of range and intensity. Thus the varying descriptions from members and guests here. I'm beginning to wonder if Injury Based should even be classified as 'spondylosis, as the term implies a continual degeneration, which I don't believe is true in my case. Throw the two together and it's not difficult to see where the confusions in diagnosis and treatments might occur.

    I was diagnosed in 1981 and was told it was a degenerative condition. Basically, I expected it to be a lot worse by now. It isn't, really. I manage it better and get less headaches. The only deterioration has been age-related really, and I'm more inclined to not try to prove to myself that it's surmountable as a problem......more time to think!!

    When I read the c/s posts here, I do notice that some descriptions suggest almost total disablement whilst some, like mine, suggest a semi-functionalism ( or semi + functionalism ) and I don't think we should all be visualising the worst long term scenario and considering the more invasive therapies (injections, surgery ) which, unfortunately, those with a more serious grade c/s must consider.

    No need to mention here who the real heroes and heroines of c/s are.

    Gerry[/quote:901f491880]

    [color=blue:901f491880]Hello everyone...Im new here and waiting for approval, but i just had to reply to this conversation. I also have CS and have been told it is from an injury at work 11 years ago....I have worked in Disabilities as a carer for 24 years and have re injured or aggravated my neck many times. Since 2005's aggravation, i have had almost continuous headaches which wear me out a lot.!!!!!!!!! I am relieved to hear that others agree that this in not just a 'older age' thing....I have had this since i was 32.....I have always felt it was way too young to have a degenerative neck problem.

    I am currently off work AGAIN and have been told this time that i can not return to my field of work..... sad I have an appointment in a month with a Neurosurgeon who will hopefully tell me where to go from here, as i am sooooo fed up and exhausted with the pain and headaches.

    Thanks for listening.....Jas.... :roll:[/color:901f491880]

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  • Posted

    hello jas how old are you now, if you have had it since you were 32, i've had it since i was 31 and now i am 48, what has your gp said. good luck with the neurosurgeon, i had one consultation 13 yrs ago and apart from that all i have been offered are stronger and stronger pain releif , try not to go down that road. any way good luck again chris
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