Blood in urine

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On my 69th birthday went to a Phillies game and while in the bathroom my urine was a dark chocolate color.This has happened to me previously in my life 3 other times.The first time I was in my young teens and was admitted to hospital and diagnosed with a infection and treated and it cleared up.The second and third times were within the last two years the last being a week ago at the game.The second time my urologist prescribed antibiotics and it cleared right away.I have an appointment sched.for my third instance but it cleared the next day on its own.Anyone with similar problems.I have bph and take a muscle relaxant which helps but still get up to go 3-4 times a night,during the day everything is normal.Thanks for any help.

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  • Posted

    Only a urologist can check all possibilities, but be sure to be checked for urethial cancer. This can only really be done by a cystoscopic examination - a visual inspection of the bladder by inserting a thin tube into the eye of the penis. It has a lens and light at the end. It is uncomfortable, perhaps even painful (my first was just a sudden sharp pain as it went through the prostate area; others varied with one or two being quite painful I'm afraid).

    Cancer is mainly a disease of ageing; so the older one is, the more likely it is to occur. If caught early, it is treatable with a good chance of success.

    I say all this because my GP did not refer me for nearly two years with a similar symptom, so it had advanced quite a bit.

    Having said all that, such cancers are only the sixth most common, so there's a good chance your problem is only an infection. But don't take any chances.

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    • Posted

      I've had three (modern ones) and not at all painful unlike the old rigid ones when I first had one in 1983.

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    • Posted

      Yeh, I've been unlucky - I think I was used as a training aid for newbies!

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    • Posted

      I had an angiogram like. It took him 50 minutes and he kept asking for different sizes of catheters. Then when he could not get round a tricky bend he asked the nurse if she coukd do it. No fear, she replied so he stopped then saying I think that we have seen enough. 
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    • Posted

      Go to a doctor who isn't too old, in his 40s and at University hospital if possible.  Make sure he/she uses a flexible scope for the urology, and that there is a screen that the patient can see.

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    • Posted

      I would say that a "University Hospital" may be overkill for this problem; at our practice, all of our doctors were trained at University Hospitals, but are able to treat our patients faster and with fewer hospitals than they may have had to endure at our prior hospitals. In many University Hospitals, it will be a new resident doing your procedure vs an experienced surgeon (depending on the practice you choose.)

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    • Posted

      It was a very experienced surgeon (mid 60s or so) who did the disasterous Greenlight procedure that left me totally incontinent about 16  months ago.  He was from a top medical school and did his fellowship at Cal Berkeley, so I felt good about his CV.  He was at a large practice (over 12 urologists), but his office equipment was--I know now-- really dated.  For cystoscopies, the old CRT scope was positioned at my shoulder where I could barely see by twisting my neck.   I now see a doctor connected to a university hospital, and the procedures and the equipment are so much better than before.
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    • Posted

      Glenn,

      I had a rigid without any anathesia from an old school doc. I learned what the term "hitting the ceiling" really meant smile Never again. I actually left my last uro because he practically insisted on a rigid, when two other younger uro's said they could get the same result from a flex.

      Jim

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    • Posted

      For me, the flexible scope gave a high quality image that I could actually see with the large screen positioned to allow the patient to see.  And the procedure was totally painless.
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  • Posted

    I would not be overly concerned. Sure, cancer is always a possiblity, but given your history sounds like typical bph symptons. I've had brown colored urine several times myself. If you have a good urologist, they should know what to do and what not to do. 

    As to your night time symptons, do you know what your retention is? If not, your urologist should be able to tell you. Almost all urologists have portable bladder scanners their office for this purpose. 

    Jim

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  • Posted

    Jack see a doctor when you can  It better to be safe but I don't think you have cancer you may have a infection being you had this kind of problem before.  It's better to clear up the infection that could make things worse  Drink lots of water and relax  Ken 

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  • Posted

    I had a blood in the urine for several years following TURP surgery. Any form of exertion would bring it on. Starting about a year after the surgery. Went thru all the requisite exams with no conclusion as to source. The last event blocked the bladder and my ability to pee. Introduced to Mr. Foley. The diagnosis? Xarelto. The blood thinner for AFIB was the culprit. Now I can work/workout with no blood. Trying to keep the Urologist and Cardiologist informed is another story. Happy to be rid of blood thinner but unsure of consequences.
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    • Posted

      How are you doing now.  Did you look into having the A-FIB taking care of.  Last year I was a mess  was in the hospital 9 times from A-FIB attacks.  I finelly change doctors.   November 29th I had 9 hour abalation done they burnned the left side of my heart.  after 2 month's I go to the gym I lost some pounds and inches and off one of my blood thinners  Still on one  but may stop that in august.  also off my blood pressure pills.  Have it taking care off it has changed my life.  Ken Have not been in the hospital in 8 months  it's great  I hated them attacks

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    • Posted

      Had the ablation. But Cardio prescribed the thinner anyway. (Low dose aspirin will thin blood enough to cause bleeding too.) Urologist said stop.No heart attack yet.
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    • Posted

      Aspirin does not protect from AF related strokes, being an anti-platelet not an anti-coagulant.
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    • Posted

      I'm about 6-7 months out. Have not experienced any sustained arrhythmia since surgery. The occasional flutter short lived - a few seconds. Still monitored by Cardiologist. He is aware I've stopped Xarelto. So cautiously optimistic. Good luck with yours.

       

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    • Posted

      Sounds good. Still a little nervous about the whole procedure---somehow burning the inside of your hearg does not seem natural.
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    • Posted

      Thanks Derek. Not clear on differences between the two. During my discussion with Cardiologist and with respect to aspirin he discouraged me from aspirin (as well as Xarelto). Aspirin, according to him, would promote bleeding more so. And not provide protection against clotting. Perhaps this is what you're getting at.

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    • Posted

      Aspirin does not stop clots forming only warfarin or NOAC's will. Any of them can cause bleeding but the NOAC's scare me more. 

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    • Posted

      You'll be in lala land. 💤 Post op uncomfortable. Laying still until the pressure bandage is removed (4-5hrs). And one more VERY important suggestion. When they tell you to shave the area - shave thoroughly AND and well beyond the area! Unless you're into Brazilians! Can't emphasize enough. They tape the pressure bandage with what looks like packing tape - but a whole lot stickier. And they aren't worried about what you'll feel when it's ripped off. 😱

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    • Posted

      Derek,

      I think it's fair to say that there's some differering opinions and controversy regarding anti-platelet verus anti-coagulant therapy with AF related strokes. Anti-coagulant therapy is more agressive but my doc was OK with me taking aspirin after one of my bouts of AFIB. Lots of factors to consider including the side effect profiles. Interesting discussion even if way OT smile

      Jim

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    • Posted

      The first time I had an angiogram I had a nice young nurse pressing down on my groin for a couple of hours.

      When I had a procedure last month they put in a stich and the sticky tape on top.

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    • Posted

      If you go to the Arrhythmia Society web site it will tell you that Aspirin is now known to be worse that useless for AF. Worse because it increase the risk of gastric bleeding without any gains.

      I have been in permanent AF for much of the past five years. Warfarin gave me side effects (mainly painful weight bearing joints) and NOAC's are contra indicated as I have a tisue aortic valve.

      I stopped and started warfarin.. mostly stopped and took aspirin at my own risk without ill effects.

      In April I had an Amplatzer Amulet fitted in my left atrial appendage where clots form. The Amulet is a mesh filter that stops clots from getting out so I no longer need Warfarin or a NOAC. I had to take Plavix for the first month and now have to take aspirin until October..

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    • Posted

      Is that the ECAS? If you have a link handy to any of the aspirin studies please PM it to me. I'm assuming then that you're treating heart rate? Have you tried any of the antiarrhythmic drugs or considered ablation?

      Jim

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    • Posted

      Amiodarone just about killed me and I am also intolerant to Bisoprolol. I had two cardioversions that got me back into NSR until my vagus nerve was stimulated. First by the probe during a colonoscopy. Next time by the finger of the Nurse Practitioner doing a DRE.

      I had an MRI compatible  pacemaker fitted in July 2015.

      I was then offered an ablation that I turned down as I was not taking Warfarin. I later agreed to an AV node ablation but as I was waiting for an MRI scan they did not want to do it prior to that and leave me pacemaker dependent during it. I then rather dropped of their Radar.

      I saw a cardiologist in April after having the Amplatzer Amulet fitted and asked for another cardioversion. He suggested doing a cryoablation as well. I said that I would talk it over with the Cardio who fitted the Amplatzer  as he wanted me on Apixaban for a month prior and after the ablation.

      The other asked why I thought I needed it done as mostly I am unaware of my heart rate being high. I said mainly to avoid a trip or two a year to A&E when it is way out of control. The pacemaker clinic say that it has recorded rates of 140bpm but my BP monitor has never shown anything over 90 and normally in the 70's.

      The consultant I see at the hypertension clinic also questions why I would want it done and told me ask for their success rate. I said that if back in sinus rhythm I would at least get true BP readings on my monitor as it may not give accurate readings when in AF. He said that was not a good enough reason. So basically two are against it.

      At the moment I want to see what improvements I get on my joint problems now that I am not taking Warfarin.

      I'll have a look for what I can find on aspirin studies. ECAS does not sound familiar.

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