Calling any Post Lapidus survivors x

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I have been following other users of this site who have had their operations.  I saw my consultant, a podiatric surgeon, who has said at my age of 70 my bones are in good shape but as to the severity of my bunion he will use the Lapidus procedure and operate on the other two toes that are now hammer toes.  (My right foot is not as severe but will need to be done.)

So I am still wonderting about who to let loose on my feet a podiatric surgeon or orthpodec (with an interest in feet and ankle) surgeon. 

Are there any of you out there who have been happy with the results and have no regrets?

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  • Posted

    Hi Gilly

    I had my bunions and hammer ties on both feet done together by a podiatrist .

    My GP told me that the podiatrists have a lot more experience with bunion ops.

    I had mine done 6.5 weeks ago and I am very happy with the results . I have posted some before and after photos on this site which you can have a look.

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    • Posted

      Thank you Star - I saw those - well done you!  I think it was Steve? who posted about not using a podiatric surgeon. 

      The one on Monday has been doing operations for some time time now so he must have done an awful lot and learnt something!  But these doubts come into your mind because this decsion is in a way voluntary and if you had been in an accident I don't think the question arises as to who will be doing the work!

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  • Posted

    Hi Gilly,

    You are correct to consider who is best to perform your operation. Personally I would go for a Foot and Ankle Orthopeadic surgeon. Look at my post Orthopeadic or Podiatric post for the reasons. Though ultimately you need to do what you are most comfortable with.

    Best of luck with everything

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    • Posted

      I also thank you Steve.  I have taken on board about asking a local Sports Clinic, I think it was, if they could recommend anyone.  I did that yesterday via e-mail - will see if anything comes back.  See my post to Caroline below.
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  • Posted

    Hi Gilly

    I had a bilateral lapidus with Atkins and hammer toe surgery 27/11/14  as both feet were as bad as each other. Orthopaedic surgeon.

    was berated by the physio for having both done at once, as the recovery period is far longer, than having one done at a time.

    The problem is with these ops is that you think you're going to bounce back within weeks, not the 12 months or so given. I have brilliant weeks, followed by a lot of pain. I'm walking well but need to exercise to get me back to normal, and at 60, that takes longer than usual. Regrets, ummm, a few in the painful times, but I've got another 7 months or so to go.

    Go for it, but, consider having them done one at a time..

    caroline

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    • Posted

      Thank you so much Caroline for responding to my request.  I do wish you well and thank you for your words of encouragement and informative views. With your - Orthopedic surgeon..... surely we all start out thinking these people know what they are doing and if a success then brilliant but it is when we are met with the painful obstacles and repeat surgery, etc.

      The man I saw gave me no illusions that it will take time, he would only do one foot at a time, would not say how much pain I would get when asked as he said it deffinately varies from patient to patient.  He also told me what pain relief he would give.  I asked about physio and he said he would arrange this if he felt it necessary.  He said he was very pleased with the conditions of my bones.  He went onto to show me what he would do on a model of a foot.  Actually I am finding it hard to recall the exact 'bit's of bone he was pointing to.  BUT - I did feel I could apporach him again if I had any questions at all.  (He said he has his own website and said there is more information on there about surgery if I wanted to look at it.  He is private as well as NHS.)

      His approach was far more 'kind' than the NHS orthopedic surgeon, with a special interest in foot and ankle surgery, that I saw in 2006 who put me off.  The consultation basically went ''OK - which is your worse one?'  Then looking at the x-rays with my foot on his lap said - I will 'chop' here, there, etc it will be painful!'  When I asked if after all that will it be worth it???  He said 'I don't give any guarantees!' 

      The man I saw on Monday writes this up about himself, in amongst other information, he is -

      Registered with the Health and Care Professionals.

      Member of The Society of Chiropodists and Podiatrist.

      Fellow of the Faculty of Podiatric Surgery.

      Gained his consultant post as a Podiatric Surgeon in 1998 with a NHS Trust.

      So - I am on his waiting list - probably around July time he will call me!  Sounds scary but in the meantime I am doing as much research as possible in the hope I make the right choice even if this means getting another consultation to compare.

      (Shame this site doesn't allow editing - could be useful.x) 

       

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    • Posted

      Hi Gilly,

      Have just read a few of your posts. Be careful and understand that the Podiatric Surgeon is a non medical doctor and under their own guidelines this should have been explained to you at the first consultation. This is mandatory for a member of the SCOP which is listed above. Also be aware that Podiatric surgeons are not governed by the GMC, for the reason they are not doctors! Podiatric surgeons are governed by the HCPC which govern Physiotherapists and Osteopaths.

      You may well be completely aware of this and your surgeon may have explained this to you as he is required to.

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    • Posted

      Thank you Steve and I appreciate how helpful you are being.  I obviously do not understand how all their expertise is measured.  BUT - I do know that until it is 'over' will it be governed a success and some of us learn the hard way.  Even in the NHS surgeons are not guaranteed.  To be fair at the first consultation I had no need to have it pointed out to me it is at the bottom of his website.

      PODIATRIC SURGEONS ARE NOT MEDICAL DOCTORS

      For us the patient we all hope we are going to the right person for our health.  (I got myself transferred from a NHS hospital to another one the day before my breast cancer operation because of a lack of confidence.)

      It seems from this site there are many who have used both i.e. orthopedic or podiatric.  I will however continue to do my research and thank you again.  

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    • Posted

      Gilly,

      It sounds like the surgeon you are talking to is reputable and is informing you of his position. Though there are plenty out there that don't follow the guidelines of their organisations. So it's easy for the lay person to believe they are doctors.

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    • Posted

      Thank you Steve,

      If this podiatric surgeon works for a Private Hospital (where in fact many of the surgeons/doctors from the local NHS Hospital also work) should that give one confidence that they are not working from e.g. rented out rooms.

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    • Posted

      Hi Gilly

      Sorry to butt in. Podiatrists are not medical doctors but they are not crackpots either. They go to medical school of podiatry For 4 years to get their DMP and then they have to do residency where they are trained in podiatrist medicine and surgery. They are considered a physician who specialises in foot and ankle issues. Most private podiatrists who work in the private sector also work in NHS doing bunion surgeries. Who is good or not so good depends on the person's experience . I had mine done by a podiatrist privately on Harley Street. He has 22 years of experience both in NHS and privately. My friend had hers done by a primary orthopedist , very unhappy with the result and now she is going to my podiatrist to have the mess corrected. So it really depends. Just do your research , check your dr's credentials , years of experience and if you can find some reviews on him .

      Good luck

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    • Posted

      Sorry Gilly I meant prominent orthopedist not primary
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    • Posted

      Please do not apologise for butting in - any comments are welcome.  At the end of the day it is our responsibility who we go to.

      From what I can see on his website he has been living and woking in Salisbury since 1985.  So if still in the area - and was in a consultant post as a Podiatric Surgeon in 1998 with a NHS Trust then surely if my maths are correct 16 years on feet.  Must have learnt something and not had to leave the area!? 

      I am sorry to hear about your friend at least she was able to have you recommend your podiatric surgeon.

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    • Posted

      Star,

      No one is suggesting that Practising Podiatric Surgeons are crackpots but here are a few facts that the average lay person is unaware of,

      Whilst it is reassuring that both groups of practitioners engage in appraisal, all medical practitioners are revalidated by the GMC,are you aware that surgical podiatry is not regulated in this way.

      Podiatrists re certify with their regulator the HCPC every 2 years but only 0.86% are externally scrutinised. This contrasts with GMC led regulation which comprises of 5 years appraisal and Revalidation which is externally scrutinised at all stages.

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    • Posted

      Hi Steve

      I am not saying that you are suggesting that podiatrists are crackpots.

      All I am saying is that there are very good podiatrists which are very well trained and experienced. I am speaking from my own experience. I had a very successful surgery of both my feet at the same time . My podiatrist was very realistic and told me everything I needed to know . He didn't gloss over things was very open about what can happen etc.

      at the end of the day it's up to each individual to make a decision who yo go with. As far as I am concerned I am very happy withy choice of podiatrist.

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    • Posted

      I have had a look and there are few all good - however - would I expect to find not so good posted?  I also notice there is a Facebook link - I do not do Facebook but in this case would that be where the real opinions would come out?  He also does a Blog - so certainly seems to 'keep in touch'.

      He also owns a 'Foot Clinic' where his wife I believe is a podiatrist.  So they have set up and stayed in the same City.

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    • Posted

      Star,

      I'm glad to hear you have have had successful surgery . You are also correct that the choice who to use to perform your surgery lyes with the individual.

      As in any profession no doubt there is good and bad.

      My concern is without proper 100% external revalidation how can any patient be sure of the surgical standards of a surgeon that they may intend to use?

      Reviews and testimonials on websites set up by the individual surgeon are rarely useful as these websites are mere advertising.

      So anyone trying to promote their own business would be in no hurry to advertise criticism about their services.

      As the surgeon is usually the moderator of his own website they will have the final decision what is visible and not.

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    • Posted

      Steve

      I agree in so far as, and I quote, 'Reviews and testimonials on websites set up by the individual surgeon are rarely useful as these websites are mere advertising' BUT as I said he has stayed in the area for a good few years now.  It is not an area that I would say he could 'loose himself' in so surely why would anyone stay around if the results were poor - why not move on?

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    • Posted

      Gilly,

      i just might advise you to see a physio before you have the op, and get instructions from them about exercises to do whilst recovering.

      I found that I had a lot of muscle wastage therefore after op problems with gluts, knees etc. which I still have.

      who ever does your surgery will probably have a favourite physio, who will know their work and can advise accordingly.

      my surgeon was the past president of both the British, & European  orthopaedic  foot & ankle societies, member of the American foot thingy's nhs consultant, senior university lecturer, foot and ankle consultant to the local rugby & football teams etc etc, reminded me of Father Christmas's little brother, (but, as serveral nurses have told me since, orthopaedic surgeons are butchers) and the physio who he refered me to was appalled that he did both  at once.

      I'm also  horrified  about how naive I was going into this, went to the GP sept 2013, then I was to busy to do anything, back August 2014 after serious infection in the major toe joints, she picked the surgeon from a list, first consultation 25 sept, and then op 27 nov. 

      My only regret - not finding out about exercising and recovery options, although, I am supposed to be a couple of months ahead of where I should be. Last week managed to walk 3.5 miles home from work, then 30 mins later 3 miles to a rugby match, and 3 miles back. Next day was fine to walk another 5 mile round trip. This week have driven both ways to work, and I've been in agony, heavy exercise session last night and the feet are happy again.

      but I've talked to a lady today that had the same bilateral procedure, plus other nasty bits and she was on crutches for a year, and was back to 'normal' another year later, this was 12 years ago and she's now 47.

      I'm glad you're only having one foot done at a time, get the bad one done first, I was only on meds for 5 days - the worse pain you'll feel is when you have to get yourself home, through your front door and into bed, and then your trapped in the house for a fortnight.

      podiatrist v orthopaedic, no idea, your feet, your choice but be sure.

      good luck

      caroline.

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