Can Hypothyroidism cause muscle twitching and fasciculations?????

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Hello,

I have been having muscle twitching and fasciculations for over a year now and was wondering if Hypo can cause this?

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  • Posted

    Hello ChrisA15:

    My name is Shelly and I am a nurse in the USA.  I have Hashimoto's Thyroid disease since 1987.

    Hypo can cause aches and pains and in some people severe cramps.  However it could occur.  Most muscle problems can be from low levels of magnesium, potassium, and calcium.  Also Vit D.   These can be easily checked by blood levels.

    If you can eat nuts they help with magnesium or get a decent multivitamin.  You could be low in the minerals listed above. See your doctor for blood work.

    It would be wise to have a TSH level (thyroid stimulating Hormone) and a parathyroid hormone level,  T3 and T4 , and a mineral panel to include: Potassium, calcium, magnesium, sodium, Iron and Ferritin levels and Vit D.  You could be low in just one of them or have a few that are low.

    Any questions just ask,

    Shelly

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  • Posted

    Whatever the cause Chris, I take Quinine Sulphate tablets that was prescribed by my Dr. as a result of having leg muscle spasms. Mine may have been caused by an under active thyroid, but I haven't had muscle twitching or cramps since. It was after taking QSulphate that I was diagnosed with an UAT.

    In the UK you can't go to a NHS Doctor with a list of test requests. You can only say what you're feeling and perhaps make suggestions.

     

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    • Posted

      Thanks, Barbara! I was just onine looking at many possible (and worrisome) causes of muscle twitches, and now I'm even more concerned and confused by my persistent hand and foot muscle twitches. These have been chronic for several months. First thing that I'm going to do is up my magnesium and calcium intake and see if that helps. Thanks for your reply. --S
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  • Posted

    My first thought is what does your doc say, if you have seen him/her, if not you should have, if you are a treated hypo patient you may be hyper, apart from hypo,, how much hyper or hypo? Well we are all different. Your doc would have had a tsh check done,,,,,,,,,,,or would if you have seen him/her. If you were really in a bad state when originally diagnosed you could be,,, just could be,,, more sensitive. After this, as you have from another answer,,, check other different levels until you solve it with your docs help, if you go alone you are in the dark and that’s not the best way. A good rule for all thyroxine users is use the SAME brand always,
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  • Posted

    Muscle Twitching is how I determine if I am undermedicated or hypo.  Also, my nerves are extremely sensitive to my thyroid symptoms.  When I am overmedicated they vibrate and I have restless leg syndrome.  My symptoms help me to adjust my meds because I'm going through menopause and my hormones fluctuate so much throughout the month.  
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    • Posted

      Thanks for the reply Shannon. I also have had a lot of twitching going on in my feet and hands for the last few months, AND also some RLS for the first time ever. I take plenty of magnesium, as well as lots of other vitamins/minerals and a eat whole foods diet. My TSH is too low (below 1), my T3 is in the normal range, and my T4 is way too low. I take Cytomel and Synthroid. I can't tell if I have too much thyroid supplementing or too little! Not sure if the RLS and muscle twitching is related to the thryroid, and in what way. --Suzanne
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    • Posted

      Balancing my thyroid seems like such a fine line these days.  I used to take Synthroid for years and my body didn't have any symptoms.   I am 50 years old now and in the past couple of years I have changed my medication three times because I started having really bad nerve pain in my feet and terrible restless leg syndrome to the point it was hard to sleep and painful to walk.  I'm pretty sure it was my hormone levels changing because of Menopause.  I am now taking Thyro Gold.  In my opinion the natural meds are way better.
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    • Posted

      Thanks, Shannon. I've been talking with Barbara and am considering trying ThyroGold, too. Thanks for the nudge and for sharing your experience!
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  • Posted

    I have been having nerve pain in my legs and feet. I didn't know what it was neither did the Doctor. You've answered a long term question. So do I ask my Doctor to change the Levothyroxine I'm presently taking?

    last year, after a blood test, I was dropped 100mcg. At that time I was my normal weight. A year on, my hair fell out and I'm fourteen pounds over weight! Any suggestions?

     

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    • Posted

      Helena - In my experience, my hair starts falling out when I'm undermedicated.  Our symptoms don't always match what our blood results are.  I adjust my medication based on my symptoms and not what my numbers are, as long as I'm in range I'm happy with that.  The most important thing to me is how I feel.  I started having nerve pain when I was taking Levothyroxine.  After I switched to a natural medication it completely went away.  Now I only have nerve issues when I'm overmedicated.  It sounds like your meds still need to be adjusted.
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    • Posted

      A rough guide to how much thyroxine to be on is 1.7mcg for each kg of body weight.

      I get shooting pains and hair loss when under medicated.

      Out of interest is your thyroid completely defunct, or no longer there? I've got this theory that people without a functioning thyroid don't do so well on T4 only meds. I switched to ThyroGold an OTC Natural Desiccated Thyroid and am getting on much better. Now been on it for 9 months at a dose of 750mg at a weight of 53kg. I was previously taking 100mcg of thyroxine when I weighed 61kg. I hope this has given you an idea of how much thyroxine you might need and its equivalent dose if you decide to do something else.

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    • Posted

      An update... I've now been on ThyroGold for 13 months (since June 2015), weigh 49kg and most of my under-active thyroid symptoms have gone. However, I would say that the switch to ThyroGold has been a success as most of my under-active thyroid symptoms have gone. I still have some brain fog and fatigue symptoms though these could be due to the allergies/intolerances - since mid 2014 I have developed a number of allergies and intolerances (carbohydrates, corn, gluten, dairy, soy, potato, fruit, sulphites..). To avoid unpleasant symptoms (diarrhoea, stomach cramps, eczema, mouth ulcers, itching all over, muscle & joint pains, swollen calves & ankles & fingers/hands, bloating, flatulence, burping) I now have to stick to a very basic diet of meat and a limited range of vegetables.

      However, what I don't understand is why I need a lower dose. My blood tests in September & October 2015 were in range (dose =750mg, weight 53kg). Using the same dose to weight ratio, I should now be on 600mg. But symptoms and blood test last month indicate this dose is too high and I have reduced the dose to 450mg.

      Has anyone got any ideas on why I now need less thyroid hormone? My thoughts are:

      1) my thyroid has stated working again - unlikely, as my immune system did a good job of attacking it 40 years ago, when I was diagnosed in 1990 my TSH was 170.

      2) ThyroGold tablets are stronger - unlikely as thyroid hormones aren't addictive there is no incentive for the manufacturer to do this and they would lose money

      3) my body is processing/absorbing the thyroid hormones (ThyroGold) better. Does anyone have any ideas why this would be?

      Can you think of any other reasons I would need a lower dose? Could it be due to going through the menopause?

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