Cognitive behavior therapy

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I was just officially diagnosed with fibromyalgia three days ago, although I believe I've had it for quite a while. My rheumatologist told me that there are no medications that help fibromyalgia. He told me that I have to take control of fibromyalgia or it will take control of me. I was told to start cognitive behavior therapy to help with dealing with my pain. He told me that most people with this condition have had an abusive childhood (but not all people) which would explain why I have this chronic illness now! I'm curious to know if anybody has tried this kind of therapy and it has helped? How many of you have had an abusive past (if you're willing to share)? Thank you in advance :-)

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  • Posted

    CBT is good if well conducted by a skilled therapist;  otherwise: run as fast as you can.biggrin

    I do believe fibromyalgia is co-related with trauma but not only childohhod trauma. It can be revived childhood trauma or adult trauma. 

    As for meds: you doctor doesn't know what he's saying: for eg. ask him about LDN.

    Soon fibromyalgia will leave rheumatology scope. Although it's the body that hurts it has a lot more to do with neurology and endocrinology.

    Sleep well. Teresa.

     

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  • Posted

    I have had an extremely abusive childhood and went on to marry twice, who both turned out to be abusers. I then despite being incredibly wary eventually married for a 3rd time. My husband, who I've been with for 13yrs now is the best thing to ever happen to me after having my children.

     My husband and I were also held up during our work at gun and knife point, thankfully neither of us was physically hurt. So the point I'm making is that any of these things and a few other major events in my life could well have triggered my fibro. I have seen a couple of really good therapists and one pretty poor one.

    For me cbt  helped me come to terms with the events that plagued me. So if you find a therapist that you feel you can work with, then go for it. I'm all for trying most things to see what works and what doesn't

    Good luck 

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  • Posted

    My first instinct is to tell you to find a new doctor.  I've had fibromyalgia for at least 20 years and did not have a traumatic event to bring it on.  I believe mine started when I took antibiotics for a year to ward off urinary tract infections that I kept getting.  They totally depleted all my good bacteria and I developed a host of problems that I still have today.  I believe some meds help but it is a crap shoot to find which ones will work for you.  Some will help with various symptoms but will not relieve all your pain.  Some relief is better than no relief in my opinion.  What works for one does not always work for others so a good doctor will be willing to work with you to find the right medication or combo of medications.  My doctor is always open to holistic options as well as traditional meds and has a wonderful listening ear to try to develop a new plan when one doesn't work.  I'm very sensitive to meds and have had some trouble with side effects so don't be afraid to try something new if what you are currently on isn't working after a couple of months.  If your doctor isn't willing to try medications, I would run for the hills and get a new doctor.  Just my opinion.  Good luck on your journey.

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  • Posted

    Hi and welcome,

    Sounds much like my consultant on diagnosis day.She wrote "fibromyalgia" on a piece of paper and told me to go research it myself as she did not treat it and would discharge me back to my GP. Her only advice "Positive mental attitude otherwise you will never get out of bed."

    On the drugs front - I can't cope with the side effects so use supplements, diet, hypnotherapy, epsom salt baths, exercise and a good dose of humour to see me through.  Without the folks on here I think I would have gone under!

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  • Posted

    CBT therapy has made my life more bearable and the therapist makes you feel at ease from first point of contact.  For me it's the best positive outcome I have come across to help with my thoughtful process of my daily life.

    I recommend all to give this therapy a try.  It doesn't take the pains away but does bring mindfulness in your daily routine.

    I believe not just people with illnesses but ALL should have these therapies as part of their lives.  The world would be  better place for us all.

    Give it a try, NO meds are needed. Just your positive attitude to life. wink x

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  • Posted

    Not sure I agree with your rheumatologist on this point.  We were extremely poor when I was a child but I had doting parents and my mother would go without to ensure I had everything I needed and she could possibly provide.  I therefore had a safe and kind and loving upbringing with no trauma whatsoever.  Life throws stuff at us and all of us have had to deal with upset at some point or another, as they say 'that's life' but I'm not convinced anything I've had to deal with throughout my life has specifically caused my current pain and other symptoms.  I was on statins for a short time which caused horrendous muscle pain but when I stopped them the pain subsided fairly swiftly and for some years I had no related symptoms until a couple of years ago when I started to experience all the issues I now have which match fibromyalgia.  

    I have seen various GPs at my group practice and gone through a whole list of tests and possible diagnoses, some convinced its definitely not fibro, one of which mentioned it but on subsequent appointment had appeared to move away from fibro.  I've now been referred to a neurologist re the issues with 'brain fog'.  I went for a first acupuncture consultation and treatment over the past weekend and the acupuncturist mentioned she had been reading up on fibro, as she needs to treat people with this syndrome differently.  She said one eminent professional had run a series of tests on fibro patients and found that they commonly had excess lactic acid being produced.  Apparently they had restricted blood flow/oxygen to the nerves/muscles and the lactic acid was being produced as a result, which then caused the pain.  She also said that she's noted that of her patients, those with fibro symptoms tend to be overheated - she noted that my tongue was very red which denoted my body temperature was too high.  She's recommended I cut caffeine from my diet (ie cut out my beloved coffee), dont smoke and do gentle but aerobic exercise to increase the blood oxygen levels.  Obviously too early to tell if this will help but worth a try.

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    • Posted

      Hi loxie

      I had to cut out caffeine too. I made it easy for myself and  avoided headaches from withdrawal by mixing caffeine free coffee with the normal one on a ratio of 20% caffeine free to normal then increased until just caffeine free over a couple of weeks.  May be worth trying. Can't say I miss the caffeine.  Also I have gone refined sugar free and gluten free too and it helps.

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    • Posted

      Thanks Maggers, it does make sense to remove excess caffeine from my diet - I know I'm too much of a coffee addict.  My partner drinks ginger tea (either with lemon or orange flavouring) which he says gives him the same 'kick' as coffee but without the caffeine and has the added benefit of being a natural anti inflammatory.  Unfortunately I hate the taste but I'm going to give it my best effort.  I so agree about the refined sugar too.  I've never had a sweet tooth but the last year I've been craving sweet stuff and I always feel quite ill if I over indulge on sugary stuff.  Luckily my blood sugar level came back normal as I was worried my sweet cravings may be indicating onset of diabetes but thankfully not.  Being post menopause gluten gives me issues too, so I either dont eat much or make my own bread and leave it to prove longer so there's less gluten.  Has cutting out gluten helped at all?
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    • Posted

      Yes can honestly say going gluten free has helped. With the caffeine I used caffeine free mixed twenty per cent free to eighty normal. then I altered the balance in favour of caffeine free til made it totally caffeine free. Green tea with lemon is also good.  It's a case of finding what works as we are all different. I had a terrible sweet tooth but haven't missed the sweets and chocolate at all. I have become a supermarket bore by checking labels. I can't believe how much hidden sugar is out there!
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    • Posted

      yet another new line of research i've started - how to reduce lactic acid build-up.  This is getting a bit like 'all roads lead to Rome' however.  Same old same old ie increase magnesium, increase oxygen, increase fitness - all the stuff we're already doing and trying and still not finding relief.  oh well I'll be the fittest healthiest bed-ridden cabbage there is at this rate. smile
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