COPD sufferer

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i have been told I'm 52 and this year was told I'm omly using 30 percent lung capacity because I'm a smoker and now have COPD I lost my husband 5 years ago to emphasimia I know have this and have been told I have 2 to 5 years to live would you say this is correct 

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  • Posted

    Dear Denise

    I would suggest very strongly that ANYBODY can estimate the life expectancy of somene with Emphysema is talking utter rubbish. Recent statistics suggests that a sufferer has a life expectancy of 81 years provided they give up the smokes, take regular and programmed exercise and eat wisely. There you have it!

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    • Posted

      Thank you for your response Martin I am petrified because my husband died 5 years ago and they were correct with his he died within the 5 yrs at 57 I also have spinal conditions which require surgery doing so am thinking the hospital need to do the spinal surgery now rather than later because I know with Steve he ended up with phnumonia about 4 times a year with his emphasimia
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    • Posted

      Hi Martn,Can you tell me where to look up the life expectancy research you mentioned? you can privately message me if you need to.

      Cheers,

      Eleanor

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  • Posted

    Hi Denise

    Please don't become disheartened - where there is life there is hope. I treat each new day as it comes - as a challenge to be overcome. You should too. Be well, Martin

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  • Posted

    If you avoid breathing smoke, chemical, mold, and any other irritants then you could live a very long time.  At 52 I would expect you to live at least another 20 years--more if your careful. 
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  • Posted

    You probably know this Denise but you really must give up smoking...and I am sure your doctor has told you this.  Doctors aren't always right....it all depends on what you are prepared to do to improve your lifestyle.  I was diagnosed when I was 23 with Bronchiectasis and was told that it would get progressively worse as I got older, that I would have to take medication for the rest of my life and that it was a progressive disease.  I have never smoked but my husband died of lung cancer (a smoker since age 14)..at the age of 64.  I have had ongoing tests, Xrays, Cat Scans etc., and last week I was told that my lung capacity is 85% which is very good for someone who has had bronchiectasis for as long as I have.  It hasn't got any worse, and has been "stable" since 2006. I am not a great sports/exercise fan so no I don't do a lot of that, but I sing and am a professionally trained singer.  When you sing they train you to breath from the bottom of your lungs which I am sure has been a great help in keeping me well.  I have learned how to get rid of mucus from my lungs, eat healthily (most of the time) and don't touch alchohol.  I have learned to read the "signs" when I am getting over tired and listen to my body talk. smile  I would get a second opinion and do what ever you can to improve your quality of life.  Oh and I have just turned 65.  I wish you all the best in your journey. 
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  • Posted

    I agree with the quitting smoking part.  If you don't quit smoking you probably only do have a few years left.  You need to learn about this disease and how it works.  If you take care of your lungs you can slow the progression and live a long time.  But if you abuse the lungs you won't last for long.
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  • Posted

    No-one on here could possibly have that information Denise - if that's waht your doctors are saying they're almsot certainly right.

    If you're still smoking you'll have less time left and will have much more discomfort and restriction of life, as no doubt you would've noticed with your husband.   

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  • Posted

    Hi Denise,I'm 57 and last July I was told I have copd with 37%FEV1 out of a score of 70%.

    I have read a lot of misinformation about copd and have been given wrong info by health care professionals a few times as well.

    I have done a lot of research myself and have recently started a pulmonary rehab session which runs over 8 weeks.It's free in Australia (I don't know where you live.)

    I would recommend the rehab to anyone.The exercises can be hard to start with but your body gets used to them and I feel good the day after.

    The other thing which is sadly under advertised with copd is the importance of good wholesome diet.If you can grow your own food.do it.

    Eat well and pamper yourself with food.Your lungs love it.

    Look up reputable lung websites connected to major hospitals for example.

    There is a lot of misleading and useless stuff out there.

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    • Posted

      Hi Eleanor I'm in the uk this was brought about because this xmas I got phnumonia I've spent the last ten to fifteen years watching my 57 yr old husband die from this disease. I have always had osteoarthritis so as you can imagine it was a great shock to me to discover I'm only functioning on 30 percent lung capacity I'm now on every inhaler available and this morning I go to Barlborough hospital with a view to having a spinal fusion more worry I've been told I need to go to pulmonary rehab I'm 52 and I know from when steve was alive certain foods and lifestyles set of exasperation. Thankyou fir your response I'm not in a position to grow my own veggies unfortunately due to my walking and bending abilities just to add I loved my time in aussie Wen mum and dad were in the forces x
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    • Posted

      Denise, why would taking responsibility for your own health through rehab "set off exasperation"?   The rehab I'm familiar with did have advice from dieticians but I don't know what you mean about "lifestyles"?  Giving up smoking?    Diet advice is surely useful if a healthier diet can improve the immune system so you're less likely to get infections which lead to the flu, whicih can lead to pneumonia if yuu have COPD

      I'd appreciate a bit of clarification, please

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  • Posted

    I agree that making predictions is unreliable. But Martin I am very interested to hear where you got those more optimistic predictions and how reliable that is. False reassurance is as unhelpful as false optimism. 
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    • Posted

      Martin, found the report with lots of figures and stats but cannot find the needle in a haystack! I cannot find a graph or study that correlates lung function now with life expectancy. Please help me out with a page of figure number.mI am familiar with the Fletcher and Peto classic graph done of decline of lung function with time with smoking compare to non smokers (in coal miners I think!).
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