I have today been prescribed Bu Tran patches

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Having just been given the patches, 5mg, and now read all the feedback shown on this site I am rather concerned about using them.  I have lived in pain for eight months.  An MRI has shown no reason why I am in pain and my left leg is getting worse.  My foot goes numb and at times I have pins and needles in the toes and foot.  The top of my leg and lower back is in constant pain and it takes a while to get going in a morning.  I think eventually a steroid injection is going to be tried.  I am told that if I had got sciatica then it would have shown in the MRI, yet the symptoms seem the same.  Worrying now as to what can be wrong and even more concerned about these patches!  I am 64 years old, very active, swim every week and walk most days. I do excercises to get motivated in a morning.  Have tried just about everything possible to try and help myself, even acupuncture, but now at a loss as to what to do.  Have seen a consultant who advises there is nothing he can do.  How do you explain that lack of sleep and constant pain drags you down to the point you feel like life is unbearable.  I am no whimp but my life is changing rapidly and stopping me doing lots of things.  Would appreciate anyone giving feedback, particularly about the use of the patches.

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  • Posted

    Hello Pitts. Try not to worry about using the patches. Everyone reacts differently and you may be perfectly ok with them. You should at least give them a try. Keep in touch
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  • Posted

    Hi Pitts - having successfully just managed to stopped using BuTrans patches I would strongly advise you not to start using this opiated drug - I know everyone reacts differently to drugs but you are proposing to commit to a notifiable addictive drug with horrendous side effects - anyone that has not experienced it should not advise on its side effects. I was desperate for pain relief like yourself and on reflection BuTrans patches didn't remove the pain it just dulled my senses so I was able to cope better initially but over the months my body got used to it and started needing more which is when the horrendous side effects kicked in. I lost a year of normal life thru this drug and became a very different person. Thankfully after a month of pergatory getting over the side effects I have a clear head and feel like me again. I'm still in pain but then I was when I was using the drugs. Research it thoroughly and if you can contact a drug centre to get a better understanding of what you are proposing to commit your body to - would you consider injecting heroin into your body???? Opiate drugs come from the same source. Sorry to be so outspoken but I am very concerned that these drugs are so easily prescribed to vulnerable people who thru lack of information and guidance become prescription drug addicts. It's like sticking a plaster over a wound it doesn't heal it it just covers it up. It's your call only you can make the decision to stick it on your body but please be warned from someone who has warn the tee shirt and is now on the good side. Best of luck. 
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  • Posted

    Whoops forgive the spelling mistakes - should have been worn not warn - Freudian slip!!
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  • Posted

    Pitts I think you need to speak to the doctor who prescribed the patches if you decide not to use them. Either way if you are anxious using them speak to your doctor. As a nurse I know lots of patients who've used them and found that their life improves dramatically because they are able to control the pain. Every patient is different and if you find they aren't for you they will prescribe something else. It's all about you being in control.
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  • Posted

    If your GP or whoever prescribed BuTrans has experienced using the drug then that's a good place to start your research before starting to use it - but if the prescriber has not actually used these patches then they're just text book quoting and you can do that yourself. Please research this forum site and any other source where you can get the feedback good and not so good from people who have actually used the patches. I understand they are good for short term use ie after an op for around a month but for long term ie 15 months as I was prescribed then I think you need to be very careful. 
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    • Posted

      That's the issue eunice, short term use. If it's prescribed correctly then there shouldn't be any problems. I as many others in medical practice, worry that patients are prescribed medication then not take it because somebody has advised them not too. Pitt needs to go back to the prescriber and that's what I've suggested.
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  • Posted

    We're on the same page then 'matron'. Unfortunately the medical professionals are so stretched that they don't always have the resources to monitor how patients are managing and it's up to the patient to shout if they're having a problem. I have two extreme opposite situations - a friend who had a knee replacement and was given liquid morphine but because she was aware of the drugs side effects she asked to be weaned off the drug after approx 6 weeks - she had no adverse side effects because it was dealt with in the recommended way - but it was initiated by her and not her GP. On the other part a friends brother was given liquid morphine after a hip replacement - 2 years later he is still on the medication and is now so addicted he's a constant 'worry' to his wife and his young children - they were not made fully aware of the long term effects. Very sad when it goes wrong that's why I suggest researching with people who have used any opiate drugs to get the full picture and then go back to the prescriber with as much information as possible. In the long term the medication will not cure the sorce of the pain just mask it - the long term solution is to find out what is causing the pain. 
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    • Posted

      I know most doctors who prescribe opiate drugs do monitor the patients and if they don't there is the added safety net of the pharmacist attached to each GP practice. Every practice has one or they may share a pharmacist. The pharmacist oversees all prescribing and I can tell you they don't miss a trick. Long term prescribing of opiates as well as other drugs is monitored closely. In my experience over many years not only in medicine but as a patient I have yet to meet a doctor who didn't discuss prescribed drugs with a patient. I know there are probably some out there but on the whole it's not common.
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    • Posted

      I must just keep slipping thru the net or maybe the system is not as good where I live! Or maybe I'm in the 'real world'! Whatever - it has made me very much more aware and made me aware of self preservation.  Pain clinics are good but having asked to be referred I understand there's a long waiting list - I still think resolving the source of the pain is the way forward. 
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    • Posted

      It's a shame the waiting list was long for the pain clinic in your area. I know where I live the initial appointment at the clinic is within 2 weeks of referral. That will be with a specialist nurse but in my experience they are just as good as the doctors. Nobody has to wait. Their philosophy is if a patient is in pain they have to be seen asap. They work very closely with the patients GP and consultant where appropriate. Anyone on long term opiates is telephoned within 48 working hours of the referral being received. It has reduced the number of patients who are opiate dependant in my area dramatically. I know this policy is used in many other NHS trusts. 
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  • Posted

    Hi Pitts,

    So sorry you have found yourself suffering like this. I agree with 'Matron' that you should discuss your concerns with the prescriber. If this is not a pain specialist I think you should ask to be referred. Also not everything shows up on MRI scans and just because they could not see a cause for your pain does not mean it is not sciatica, which is pain involving the sciatic nerve.Pain is subjective, individual to each and definately does not show on MRI. If you do get to see a pain specialist try to get copies of your MRI to take with you. Also try to write down your concerns and questions over the previous days, it is all too easy to forget when in stressful situations. I speak from the experience of having chronic pain for 7+ years. Best wishes and keep in touch.

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    • Posted

      Helen you have made a very valid point in your post. The pain specialist. Most hospitals have a pain clinic now. They are there to be used and have wonderful success rates.
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    • Posted

      Thanks for your comments Helen. I too am doubtful the problem is not sciatica. I do write everything down to be able to explain to the medics what is happening to me and your suggestion of a pain clinic is good advice. Regarding the Bu Trans patches, well....I did use one and took it off eighteen hours later! Inspite of it stating it takes about three days for the medication to work yesterday I was as high as a kite! Unable to function and feeling so ill I found it safer to stay in bed. I really cannot remember when I ever gave in to staying in bed.  I still feel sick and not altogether with it, not a nice feeling at all.  I am arranging to see my osteopath ASAP, whom I trust,  and then take it from there as to what do next.  Unfortunately my doctor is on long term sick and it was a relief GP I saw who knows nothing about me.  I am actually allergic to many things, including morphine and penicillin so believe I was silly to apply the patch but pain does kind of deaden ones thoughts. I will of course see a different doctor when I next make an appointment.
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    • Posted

      So sorry Pitts that things are so difficult for you at the moment. It really complicates things when you don't have a GP you kaow and trust and who knows you. A drug I have found really helpful for pain with no side effects for me is Palexia. it may be worth a conversation with the Dr on your next visit. Do take care, Helen.
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    • Posted

      It doesn't take 3 days to work. It takes 3 days to stabilise. I've had it on since Friday night. (It's now Monday night). I felt tired and high for days. Those are normal side effects, it's supposed to make you feel drowsy for 3 days. This relief doctor obviously didn't tell you the facts properly.
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