LPR any suggestions on how to stop it?

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In all honesty LPR is making me miserable. I've been on lanzoprazole 30mg twice a day and it's making my tongue feel swollen and my mouth dry. Symptoms haven't really stopped for the LPR yet. 

Ive changed my diet to a low carb, low acid, low fat diet. It's making me have no energy. I have changed my milk to goats milk, cheese to extra low fat cheese and cereal to corn cereal. I don't drink alcohol anymore, I only drink alkaline water or ginger tea. 

I miss having a normal diet. I get a mucousy throat from all foods. I get a small Lump in my throat from some foods which I cut out. 

Im taking slippery elm and calamus powder at night to help coat my throat and strengthen my valves on my oesophagus. 

I sleep elevated and on my left side. I eat a small bowl of cornflakes two hour before bed. I can't eat any earlier or I'd be up all night really hungry. 

I I have stopped working out my abs at the gym and Ive stopped doing any exercises which involve me lying down or using my core. 

Has anyone got any other ideas? I'm miserable and want this gone asap. I'm also a teacher and shouting doesn't help my sore voice box. 

 

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  • Posted

    What is LPR? I wish people would say what they mean in words in stead of this annoying American way of just using letters. I may be able to help, so please tell me what the symptoms are. People go on about PPI. What is it, when it isn't Payment Protection Insurance?
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    • Posted

      Lpr stands for Laryngopharyngeal reflux and my symptoms are lump in throat, sore throat, too much mucous and sometimes feeling sick in the night. Ppi are the drugs which people are given and they stop the production of acid in the stomach
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  • Posted

    lanzoporazole didnt help me, nor did omeprazole, but esomeprazole - otherwise known as nexium really did.  sorted my tongue out a huge amount.  its a slightly newer and more effective version.  ask your dr to put you on it, it really has made such a difference
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    • Posted

      Unfortunately, neither esomeprazole nor rabeprazole seem to help to treat my LPR.

       

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  • Posted

    i get all the issues u do, including the throat lump and mucus feeling, try the esomeprazole honestly, in a short time its helped massively.
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  • Posted

    Hello Relly, lansoprazole caused the intolerable dryness side-effect for me, so an alternative as JMCG suggests is worth looking into.

    Not sure why you've gone for a low carb diet. I have three bananas, six to eight slices of wholewheat bread, two lots of wholewheat cereal and so on, for gastritis. Just in case anything I do that helps me a bit might be of use to you, I'll put the details below. Excuse the long-windedness, but it's all about the possibility of anyone getting some ease from these blasted illnesses. Best wishes.

    Several small/medium meals per day (I have seven medium, one every two hours or bit longer), rather than fewer bigger ones, so you don't overfill your stomach. Eat relaxed, chew well. Be sat upright for and after meals, not bent or reclining, so you don't squash your stomach and press its contents upwards.

    Fried foods, high-fat foods/meats, dairy, high-salt foods, spicy-hot foods, tomatoes, carbonated drinks, caffeine, alcohol and chocolate can all impact on stomach and reflux troubles for some people, so personal experimentation is key. Minty foods relax the lower oesophageal muscle, as do some of the above foods and drinks, which can let acid up easier, so they are bad. I use a fruity toothpaste, and strawberry gaviscon tablets for the now only occasional acid burn.

    Wholewheat bread, cereals, bananas, hardboiled eggs are a few of the foods that suit me, but there are pulses, rice, various beans (not kidney beans apparently) and many other things to try. Chicken is one of the best meats due to its lower fat content, though even that can hit me and is not eaten lately.

    Stress, excercise and bending activity that pressure and squeeze the stomach are also to be avoided. Be as calm and stress-free as you can.

    Having your last meal a few hours before bed can prevent or lessen reflux at night, but I found that waiting to be too empty caused hunger discomfort, assorted spasms and kept me awake. Because of this I lie down about an hour and a half to two hours after last meal, and this is much better. I lie raised a bit on three pillows, on my right side, which is best for me, but the left side is  recommended as best following tests carried out with sufferers. Other people raise the bed-head itself about 6 to 8 inches or use a wedge affair..

    Another thing that helps me greatly is to not burp after ten minutes after eating, as this can bring acid up and cause heartburn. I get the swallowed air out gently just after the meal, sittiing a little forward, then don't burp till after the next meal.

    Water triggering heartburn is common. It can happen even with non-ill people. I learned that the best way to get my daily requirement is to drink around 130 ml or bit more with each meal, which, in my case, is added to by some sips of a nutrition drink. So generally I don't have to drink between meals,

    In tests there was an indication that some people with reflux suffer heartburn through drinking water in several gulps because their lower eosophageal muscle doesn't open and close correctly when doing this with fluid, and so acid can escape upwards. But just adding water to your stomach between meals, when there is still food and fluids in there, will increase its volume and raise it nearer to the top where the muscle is, the pressure of which, if too much water is drunk, can then cause the muscle to open and let stomach fluid up. Cold water can also cause spasms, so sips of usual water is best.

    Some say to drink water only between meals at points when the stomach is empty, but that cannot always be done easily - certainly not in my case where I need to eat every couple of hours or will lose more weight. I can't have between-meal water slowing things down. So I find that a little drink of water with each bite of food that gets well chewed, then a few more af the end of the meal does the trick. I also have water with two cereal meals, which may sound utterly bland but is fine to me, as I avoid dairy milk and have yet to try my cereals with the likes of oat, rice, almond or soya milk. But they are good milk substitutes for people who don't/can't have dairy, unless a person has issues with them.

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    • Posted

      Hi Paul, thank you for the really detailed reply it means a lot!

      Well, the reason I went on a low carb diet is that I'm following the fast tract diet it's American and the micro biologist that started it claims that the fermentation of food in the small intestine causes the gas to push the food back up your oesopegues (I can't spell this ever haha).

      With relation to meals, I'm a a teacher and 7 meals wouldn't work for me as I only get one break in the day. So might have to only do that at weekends.

      I've got to stay on lanzoprazole for 8 weeks until I see my ent consultant again but I'm glad it's not the acid and it's the tablets causing my throat to be dry!

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    • Posted

      Hi Relly, I know, the difficulty with the frequent smaller meals is how they can be had during suffferers' working day, except for perhaps having convenient bananas and so on, and maybe nutrition drinks and shakes - if the latter don't aggravate a person's particular stomach problem.

      As for your diet, I recall now reading of this. All I would say is that if you don't experience any improvement in time, consider reverting to a diet with carb-rich foods that will provide better energy, for things are hard enough for you without fatigue as well.

      Regarding the lansoprazole, any PPI (Proton Pump Inhibitor) will take a week or two to reduce the stomach's acid production, and obviously acid or pepsin reaching your throat would also cause irritation and so on; but the dryness I experienced with lansop' was very obvious, with my mouth ridiculously dry upon waking each morn. My oesophagus/esophagus (US) also felt wrong in a different way too. You and your doc can ascertain if that side-effect is definitely the case with you.

      Your work is hardly conducive to a stressless life, so find whatever ways you can come up with or learn about to relax when you can, for stress and anxiety alone can lead to stomach troubles, or worsen those which arise due to diet and other things. Good luck.

       

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    • Posted

      Yes the symptoms I'm getting with the ppi is nothing I've ever had before. The LPR symptoms are not as bad as before I started them, this could be the diet though. I'm doing a few more days of low carb, acid and fat (that will have made it 3 weeks)  and I'm slowly going to reintroduce whole grain cereLs and bread and then slowly move onto fruits and acidic food. 
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  • Posted

    Hi Relly and thanks for the reply, Many years ago I was training at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London. I was my teacher's last student of the day and we would walk to the tube station together. He would buy his treat of the day, a Mars bar. He told me not to drink milk or eat anything with milk in it, especially milk chocolate, as it causes the body to make too much mucus, and thick mucus at that. The food bolus then sticks with the mucus, much like pushing a nylon stocking down from the top, forming a plug that can't get through the sphincter and into the stomach, so lay off milk products. The teacher, by the way, was Bryan Drake and he died on Christmas day, some twenty years ago. His obituary is on google, and if you read it you will see he was a highly respected opera singer and knew what he was talking about. I used to get very painful blockages with the food sticking, to the extent that it caused a hernia just before the stomach, making the oesophagus narrower and exacerbating the problem. Another thing that has helped me enormously is advice given by the great botanist David Bellamy, who had his own fascinating series called Bellamy on Botany on TV many years ago. His advice was that to reduce the amount of mucus made by the body, make an infusion of thistle roots, when you can find some, a bit later in the year, or keep digging until you find some in the garden or fields. Cut the cleaned roots into small pieces and crush them on a board or using a mortar and pestle. Boil them up and take a few sips when it's cooled down. How it works is beyond my knowledge, but it has worked for me, is free and has no bad side effects, unlike the rubbish peddled by the pharmaceutical companies,  who have no interest in curing anything and couldn't care less if their garbage works or not or even if it kills people. which it does by the thousand. Good luck and let me and me know if it helps. It keeps for years and has little or no taste, so make up a few jars in the summer when thistles are common and the roots are thickest. Best regards, Chris10905
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    • Posted

      hi thanks for the information it is really appreciated! Would lactose free products still cause the mucous? I'm going to start drinking almond milk because I have goats milk at the moment and even though it feels like it's really helping, I'm not as bloated anymore, maybe i have an intolerance to cows milk. 

      I am am really a fan of herbal remedies so I'll give that a go too! Thanks!

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    • Posted

      Hi Relly and thanks for the reply. I don't know about the almond milk, but I've used it and had no problems yet, and I have used semi-skimmed goats  milk with no problems, though I tend to keep my intake of all forms of milk down, as I was unable to get any food down for over 24 hours a few years ago, and even a sip of water resulted in my oesophagus filling with saliva! I lost 9 lbs in weight in 24 hours. Not nice and there was an audible thump when the blockage finally got through and hit the bottom of my stomach. That can of Stella from the fridge was the nicest drink I've ever had! Peppermint tea helps to settle a lot of stomach problems, and like you, I am into herbal treatment as I don't like the pharmaceutical industry one little bit! It started with men from the eastern US selling snake oil in the western townships, as featured on many cowboy films. If you get nausea or travel sickness, tonic water contains quinine and has settled my stomach several times in the morning after a few too many the night before!
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    • Posted

      Hi Relly, and Chris, with regard to the issue of peppermint, mucous and so on. I suggest you check out assorted online data on why minty things are to be well avoided by people with illnesses such as ours. Mucous is a thing produced by our bodies usually to protect and soothe, including when our throats are sore or damaged, which is why it is increased at such times. Though it can of course be a bother, it is actually a natural body response. As for the matter of dairy and increased mucous, this is described as a myth, though as with most things there can be variations in our responses and experiences of things, like intolerances to certain foods. For example I tend to get awful spots from milk, while my sister doesn't. So it pays to experiment for oneself with most things, except, as you, Chris, rightly say, with the likes of milk chocolate and dark chocolate, which has caffeine and other substances in it which, like mint, can relax the oesophageal muscles and make reflux worse. White chocolate, on the other hand, only has cocoa butter in it, which contains very little of the nasty things.

      Chris, I totally agree there is definitely a business and monetary drive behind pharma which can sicken me too at times, but I saw my Dad saved from the jaws of death to enjoy another 14 or so years of precious life with us by that same industry, so the good side is clearly there too, one which, alas, you and I might have to look to for help one day, though I truly hope not. And you've brought back fond memories of David Bellamy!

       

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    • Posted

      Hi Paul, and thanks for the reply. I have to accept that there is no such thing as a panacea, sauce for the goose etc., my own experience of Bryan Drake's rule has been 100% positive. As a highly regarded opera singer and later Head of Opera at the R.C.O.M., he should know how to look after the most important and delicate parts of a singer's anatomy (no, not those!). Of course the pharmaceutical industry has for many decades saved countless millions of lives and will continue to do so, but there are an awful lot of products promoted as the new cure for this that and the other, that have no effect at all. One that did, was penicillin, which saved my dad's life. He had a carbuncle on his neck that his doctor had to drain every few weeks, sticking a sharp knife into it over a bowl. He told dad 'You realize, Harry, that it's only a matter of time before I hit the jugular.' Dad went to him one day and he told him there was a new thing out called penicillin and would he like to try it? Of course! Dr. Fleming himself administered it to dad in his room in St.Mary's hospital ai Paddington. Dad was the seventh person to have it used on him, after animal tests. The great man hadn't allowed for the fact that dad was a man, not an ox, and the dose knocked him out for three days! However, it worked and he lived anothe forty years with a deep dimple in his neck, That's the story dad told me and I have no reason to doubt it. He wasn't the sort to tell a lie and it would be great to see Dr. Fleming's notes. A bit of a digression, Paul, but your story reminded me of it.  Regarding peppermint, I shall monitor the effects, but it is common knowledge that it does help to settle a dodgy stomach. Regarding the oesophageal muscles, I had a rather nasty reflux this morning after eating toast with a good spread of marmite! So it will be bovril in future, which I prefer anyway.
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    • Posted

      Hello Chris, good story. Coincidentally just last week I had a trial to see if I could get away with vegemite on bread. Lovely, though I think it may have hit me a bit. A second few days trial of it is needed another time. But its salt level is similar to bovril, and it is the salt which can hit tissues hard - as in mouth ulcers it can cause me and some other people if enough of it makes contact day by day. Similar thing happened with oatcakes I tried a while back for a week with meals. Hit my tongue from the first biscuit, and made it more sore in a few days, followed by increased lower oesophagus pain by the end of the week. Trial and error.
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    • Posted

      Hi again Paul. I haven't tried vegemite, but I like oxo cubes and eat them a bit at a time like sweets. Always have, and a mug of hot oxo on a cold day or after a swim is very warming. Redarding the soreness in the oesophagus, have you tried aloe vera juice? It's helped me with soreness and even helps with sweat rash inside the thighs, especially if driving ina warm car for several hours. As a juice, it has little flavour and helps soreness in the throat. Must get some for my daughter, as she's had a sore throat for two days.
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    • Posted

      Hi, I remember eating oxo cubes like that! And cups of it. I used to break a cube up into baked beans sometimes too, and add curry powder at other times. Happy days! No, I've not tried aloe vera, mainly because the main soreness is good now unless I have an acid burn now and then. My sister has used it for some things over recent years too.
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    • Posted

      Hi Chris

      I think it's very hard to take nutritional advice from someonewho eats alarms Bars.You said he said to avoid milk and milk products but Mars bars are made with milk chocolate(and toffee and sugar, the main ingredient of junk food. Chocolate is also described as a common trigger for heartburn and lpr.

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