My first cataract operation is in a few days: how restricted will I be in what I can do after it?

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I haven't been able to get on to anyone at the hospital for answers and in case they don't get back to me before Friday and my GP doesn't have the info when I see him tomorrow,, could others who've had the surgery please give me some idea of what activities have to be restricted and for how long?

Anecdotally I've been told that I won't be able to drive for a week;  bend down or lift anything heavy for weeks;  or walk up and down stairs for varying lenghts of time.

As I live alone I'm concerned how much help I should be organising and would appreciate info from others who've had successful surgery.

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  • Posted

    I imagine it must have to do with the type of procedure and lens.  I am only guessing because the doctor told me the day after surgery that I could lead a normal life.  No restrictions.  (Except not to swim). He removed the patch and said "enjoy".  That I did.  He said the only reason not to lift heavy things because it might hurt...not that it would do damage, but hurt because of the unexpected movement, inflation.  Of course ask your doctor...good luck.  I cried after the patch was removed because I could SEE!!!!
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    • Posted

      Thank you!   I just managed to speak to someone on the hospital who said I definitely shouldn't drive for a week and to not lift anything heavy because of the possibility the lens could detach, that I can bend down and walk up and down stairs.

      Did you only have one cataract done?   On Friday they're removing the worst one and replacing it with a long distance lens and the other one will be done some time early next year.      

      My cataracts are very fast deteriorating ones, the surgeon said because of the cortisone puffer I've only been using for less than aa year for emphysema.    

      Another thing I'm not looking forward to is having to use my existing glasses for at least 4 weeks until I get a new lens for close up for the eye they've operated on.   They're fairly strong multi focals so I'm anticipated this is going to be difficult

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    • Posted

      Some people remove the lens from their glasses for the operated eye. I could not cope with that as I found that it gave me a double image at some angles. I bought an off the shelf pair of cheap reading glasses from Superdrug that worked quite well. 

      There is usually a six month wait with the NHS to get the second eye done. I was lucky in that when having a problem with the eye drops prescribed I spoke to a nurse who checked and found that there was a slot due to a cancellation and I had it done in about two months. 

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    • Posted

      I had my right  eye done and a permanent multi focal lens was implanted.  That was three years ago.  The doctor said to put in my contact lens in my left eye.   That combo was good for two years and then my vision in my left eye started to deteriorate.  For over a year seeing poorly and for various reasons couldn't get surgery done.  I sympathize about the four weeks.  In order to properly measure my left eye for the new lens, I had to go without my contact for three weeks.  Awful but then the new vision has made me forget those weeks!  Reading all these posts has made me relaize just how different each procedure is.  I live in Mexico.  I have multi focal lenses implanted and while my distance vision for reading is not  exactly 20/20 I can see fine to drive and can read without any glasses (after having worn them full time since age 13) 

      Just  a bit of side info,  I have a friend in the United States who had cataract surgery.  She wanted the mono lenses which Medicare didn't cover.  She paid out of pocket for that.  Her out of pocket expense was the ENTIRE cost of my surgery.  

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    • Posted

      I don't see how this would help, because I won't have a new lens for close upwork for about a month after surgery.   I'm apprehensive about how good my total vision will be over that time,  with an unoperated cataract in the left eye with a multifocal lens and a lens for longsightedness in the operated on eye ....... sorry, I hope that's not too confusing!   Surely my eyes aren't going to be able to focus together over that time, so what do I do for at least 4 weeks about driivng a car, reading, using the computer, watching TV etc?
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  • Posted

    I don't know about driving but avoid lifting heavy things for a bit but how many really heavy things do you actually lift? Carrying shopping home is OK.

    I have never heard of restrictions on walking upstairs or anything else I was back to leading a normal life and out and about the next day. On day two I went to the races and marveled at what I could now see without binoculars. 

     

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  • Posted

    I just had my cataract surgery a month ago and tomorrow I go to get fitted for my reading glasses (I picked long distance lense so I could drive without glasses).  Another thing to avoid is running or jogging as the bouncing and all is too hard on the eye.  I had to stop that for a week as well as any high impact aerobics, anything like that and of course no heavy lifting or bending over and lifting. So in my case, no loading of our kiln at school.  I had to wear the patch at night a few days just to protect the eye and to keep from rubbing it.  I was seeing really great by day two.  Just make sure to keep up with all your eye drops they give you as that is important.  Oh, and don't forget you can adjust your size of things on your computer with the three bars in the upper right corner of your screen (or there are other ways).  That may be help as well temporarily.  Good luck and you will be surprised how easy it goes. 
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  • Posted

    Wow each surgery is so different.  My doctor told me I could do anything.,..he said the lens would be secure.  Wonder what the difference is in the what to's and what nots.  My grandmother had cataract surgery and had to stay with her head between sandbags for a while so things have definitely improved.
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    • Posted

      Thanks for the laugh!  Sandbags??  I guess so she couldn't move but it does sound very inconvenient, to say the least ....

      It seems the aftercare procedure varies from country to country - I'm in Australia, where are you?

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    • Posted

      I live in 

      Cuernavaca Mexico, an hour south west of Mexico City.  My grandmother also had those glasses that looked like Coke bottles, since an implanted lens was unheard of.

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    • Posted

      To be honest, I was surprised when I was told I would get an implanted lens on the public health system because I thought they were only for rich people!   I assumed they'd just remove the cataract and that would be it
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    • Posted

      Interesting.  It seems that the implanted lens is actually a cheaper way to go.  Buying glasses for the rest of your life?  The cost of glasses over a period of time is more than the cost of the lenses.  For example, I have insurance here in Mexico that covered all the surgery and most of the cost of the multi-focal lens.  The total cost of surgery (including lens) was cheaper than the deductible in the states.  I can understand why people do medical tourism.  I feel totally confident in my doctor.  Latest equipment, he is constantly going to workshops, studying more.  The big difference I see is there is no malpractice insurance here to and doctors are upper middle class,not rich.
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    • Posted

      I've had multifocals for years and the implanted lens will be to correct longsightedness, so 'll still need glasses for close up work.

      On a government pension my glasses used to cost around AUS$120 every couple of years, but that was recently reduced to $10 under an indigenous health scheme.   I'll need new glasses twice:  once after this surgery and then again after the second one next year.

      If I didn't qualify for free surgery as a pensioner, the surgery would be costing me around $3000 per eye, which I would never have been able to afford.

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    • Posted

      Interesting....prescription lenses in Mexico are very expensive.  One pair (not the dime store toss always) cost around 400 dollars U.S.  
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    • Posted

      They;re expensive here too unless you're on government benefits, in which case the lenses are free, consultations are free and frames are cheap, although you don't get the same range to choose from
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