New Uro

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My new Urologist said that, I have a choice of a Urolift or a button turp to cure my bph, which one do you guys suggest.?

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  • Posted

    Dear Lew,

    There are many more procedures to choose from. These are probably just the ones he does. I would seek a second and even third opinion before committing. Take a look online for local uros who have good reviews and make appointments. Look up BPH treatments online and read about the efficacy and side effects. Then decide. In the meantime, if you can't urinate, learn how to self catheterize.

    Good luck,

    Fred

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  • Posted

    I agree totally with Light1 that there are many more options out there, including self catherization, that you should consider. However, if you are limited to only two choices above, the answer depends on whether or not how much dry ejaculation concerns you. Much concern, go with Urolift. Little concern, go with button Turp.

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  • Posted

    As a follow-up to the preceding comments, if you are fortunate to find a uro who has personally undergone a BPH procedure and was satisfied you might consider that procedure if it is appropriate for you. However, doctors find it unprofessional to discuss their own medical conditions with their patients,

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  • Posted

    yes, i would ask for a second

    opinion as well.

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  • Posted

    Did he do any kind of inspection of your prostate and explain why is choosing those two options? Why not Rezum as an option?

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  • Posted

    Good Afternoon:

    Steering Patients in Medicine

    In real estate, steering clients on the basis of characteristics defined under the Fair Housing Act is not only unethical, but, it's illegal because it limits housing opportunities available to a buyer.

    The same philosophy could be used on doctors in medicine.

    Everybody wants more money. Nobody (even doctors), are immune to the disease.

    Just because a doctor is only qualified in certain procedures is no excuse for not giving their patient as much information as possible on what procedures and who does them are out there and available for s/he to choose from.

    Why should a patient have the possibility of a lifetime of misery forced upon them when the doctor knows there are other procedures out there that might offer their patient a better outcome.

    Steering a patient to a specific practice for monetary gain over best possible patient outcomes, is unethical and should in this man’s opinion also be illegal.

    It’s time the medical industry stopped preying on patients for their own and their practice’s monetary gain and started concentrating on making sure s/he has the most qualified doctor available for the best possible outcome from their ordeal.

    Regards,

    Raffie

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  • Posted

    I'm curious how much experience your Urologist has with the Urolift procedure. My urologist is suggesting Urolift (for $11,000 USD, some of which is paid for by insurance) and says he's done "80" or so procedures. (for Urolift, a typical number of "toggle bolts" as I call them per guy is 5-6 so maybe he's only treated 14 men?)

    He says that a rep from the Urolift company will be in the room to consult on the procedure which on one hand makes me feel good (the rep is theoretically an expert on the product) but also worries me that my care is in the hands of a salesperson. (no offense to salespeople in general)

    I may "shop around" but I don't want to travel too far to get the procedure done in case follow up care is needed and I have alienated my local urologist.

    I am pretty serious about doing Urolift in 2019.

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    • Posted

      I'm trying to remember the number of Urolift procedures My Urologist did. I believe it was about 40 different patients/procedures. I didn't have a Urolift sales person in the room. I had an anaesthesiologist and a nurse. Make sure you're out for this. I was in alot of pain upon awakening. Was pretty much pain free though in about 48 hours

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  • Posted

    I agree that you should research the other procedures first and go to another urologist for another opinion. That being said, I had Urolift done in June and have been totally happy with it. I believe Urolift is the least destructive of tissue of all the treatments. I now pee once a night, I have much more volume and force and no sexual side effects and not taking any drugs anymore. The choice is dependent on the size of your prostate though as most Urologists will not do the procedure if your prostate is over a certain size.

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    • Posted

      Ken, was the procedure painful? I have a choice of a general, what did you have for the pain? The first urologist would only give me one valium and some vicoden, so I found a new doctor who said, that I have a choice of what I can have during the procedure.

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    • Posted

      Hi there,

      wondering if you did indeed have the procedure done and whether it was painful or not. My husband had the procedure done a week ago. It was very traumatic. The nurse injected lidocaine through the meatus, (penile opening)

      and we paid extra for nitrous (laughing gas). He said he felt everything. 10 out of 10 pain. When i first saw him after the procedure he was pale, shivering and groaning. Completely in shock. They sent us home with an RX for percocet. pharmacy didnt even have it ready.

      So i've been trying to research how others procedure went to see if my poor husband was not the only one.

      Thank you.

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    • Posted

      Luci, you mean he had a urolift with nothing more than N2O? The lidocaine is only supposed to help with the instrument being inserted up the urethra. I was given N20 to help with discomfort from am in-office flexible cyctoscopy and it was very helpful, but a UroLift should be done under significant sedation. The N20 I was given was self-administered -- my doctor said when to start breathing deeply while I held the mask over my face. I did not become unconscious, just very light-headed and distracted. I was out cold from propofol administered by an anesthesiologist when I had my Urolift done several years ago. Did not have much trouble with pain when I woke up or afterwards. Just burning when voiding for a few days.

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    • Posted

      Out of curiosity I reviewed some publications on UroLift and descriptions of the procedure from some urologists' websites. Apparently there is a good number of them who do the procedure without any type of sedation. One of them said most tolerate the implants being shot through the lateral lobes which I found hard to believe, but do not tolerate the sheath going up to the bladder neck. There's also a 35 degree bend in the urethra at the external sphincter that can be painful when they have to redirect the sheath to push it further in. I understand their motivation for avoiding twilight anesthesia or beyond so they can perform it in their office without an anesthesiologist...but doing it without a prostate nerve block and oral analgesic?

      Sorry your husband had to endure that.

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