Night vs Day urination ability

Posted , 10 users are following.

Why is it that I can have such a hard time starting a stream when visiting the toilet during the night (after having been asleep for several hours) and have little problem during the daytime when awake and alert? As I see it this has less to do with BPH than with mind/body connections. 

Any thoughts on this?

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  • Posted

    I'm not sure but i do notice that when I'm moving around a lot or after running or aerobic exercise the flow seems to be easier.
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  • Posted

    I hv similar issues. What works for me is to walk around house/room for 2-5 minutes and then urinate. Alternatively, might also try rocking in place (one foot to another) for a couple of minutes. Took me some time to figure out the fix but it almost always makes stream easier to start and in my case without pain. Please let us know if this works for you. FWIW I'm sure it does have to do with BPH and nothing else. Jim
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    • Posted

      To elaborate, prior to using the "moving around technique", at times I could not initiate urination without significant pain. So much so, that often I would resort to self catherization (CIC) in these instances. But, by moving around a few minutes prior to urinating, the pain is gone and will usually pass around 250-300cc of urine leaving no more than 100-150cc in the bladder which is acceptable. I also have found that if I then lean back in a chair and slightlty tap my bladder (coude technique) I can then usually eliminate the remaining urine into a vessel,  leaving close to no post void residual. For various reasons, I only optionally do this in the evening before bed time, or if awakened, with the idea that eliminating the last 100-150cc will give me some extra sleep.

      As with the original poster, any of this is only necessary if I have been in a static position (sitting, reclining, sleeping) for a period of time. During the day, witbh normal movement, there are no issues, and I pass urine normally with very little post void residual.  

      I have asked several urologists their opinion, but no answers. At one point I thought it may have had something to do with mybladder diverticulum, but now that I am hearing similar from others, it may not be that. 

      The one other thing I have noticed is that the difficulty to initiate and pain are only present when the bladder is full which in my case is around 400-450cc. If not full, then no issues even if I am reclining or asleep. However, given my tendency for excessive urination when sleeping (or reclining) the two (lying down and full bladder) often tend to go together. 

      But whatever the dynamics behind it, it seems to work and certainly this technique is worth experimentation for anyone having more difficulty passing urine after a period of inactivity versus activity. 

      Jim

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    • Posted

      Thanks for the info I have not trtied that techniqe, at the moment I am like you except even during the day I still have issues, not as bad as at night when it's really bad and painful.

      Is it hard to learn the CIC thing? I am planning to travel overseas soon and my big worry is that is the time where I have to be prepared in case it blocks up completely.

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    • Posted

      Not hard at all, and what a load off the mind when you know that you can take care of this on your own. I have four visits to th ER behind me and said that's it, no more! My Uro gave me instructions and the materials needed and I am so much more relaxed when I go to bed each night.  
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    • Posted

      If you search under "self catherization" you will find some threads detailing my experience with self catherzation (CIC), as well as some others here.

      But briefly, I was on a regular schedule of CIC for over two years due to large post void residuals (PVR) and finally an inability to urinate at all without having to push on the bladder (crede manuever). 

      Eventually, through CIC (4-6 times per day),  my bladder apparently regained much of its lost elasticity and I was able to urinate naturally most of the time only resorting to CIC on occasion. Now, with the moving around technique, I find I can dispense with CIC almost entirely, although I keep the catheters around just in case. 

      CIC is certainly a great tool to have in your bag and can save trips to the doctor's office or hospital for caterization. It can also be an alternate approach to drugs or surgery for bph, as it was in my case for a couple of years. Should things get worse, I would probably still go back to CIC as opposed to one of the drug or surgical options. 

      Jim

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    • Posted

      Thanks for your really helpful input. Having put up with nocturnal urination difficulties for years I am really interested in anything that might help. 

      You mentioned the ‘coude technique’ but I haven’t found it described anywhere. Can you give a link or further explanation?

      Also I’ve noticed a ‘sensation’ in my feet when attempting to urinate and wondered if this only happens to me?

      Alan

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    • Posted

      Sorry, meant "crede technique", not "coude". Crede involves gentle external pressure with hands. There is also "tapping" which is what it sound like -- rhymic tapping with the fingers over the subpubic area to stimulate the detrusor muscles. Both these techniques can help start the flow. 
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    • Posted

      I once had some reflexology treatment for sciatica. There really does seem to be something in their system whereby areas of the feet are in some way linked to specific areas of the body. I haven't had the sensation you describe with urination, but I have with sexual sensation, particularly as a teenager.
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    • Posted

      What I do is sort of like a drum roll using my fingers starting with the pinky and ending with the index finger. So the movement is very fast and rhymic. I do this several times and it seems to stimulate the detrussor muscle to go into action and initiate urination. There is also the "crede" technique which is more of a "pushing" in and down. You have to experiment to see what works, but you shouldn't force things and use too much pressure. Also, as mentioned, I sometimes have success with slouching back in a chair and urinating into a beaker or urinal. Using one or a combination of these techniques (walking around a few minutes before initiating) will empty my bladder fairly completely. During the day when I have been active, I am able to empty my bladder fairly completely without resorting to any of the techniques. Again, you have to experiment to see what works for you. As someone else inferred, it's a shame that doctor's often jump right to the surgical options for bph and retention, when there are less evasive and equally effective methods around. I should also add that self-catherization (CIC) is another way to completely empty your bladder without surgery, and have written more on that in some dedicated threads. I used CIC for a couple of years but now rely mostly on the techniques metioned. If they stopped working, I would not hesitate to go back to CIC instead of surgery. As mentioned in the dedicated threads, I believe CIC rehabilitated my bladder to the point where these less invasive techniques would suffice. 

      Jim

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  • Posted

    It has something to do with "laying down" vs standing or sitting up.  I have noticed the same exact problem.  I sleep on my back or sometimes on my left side but do notice the same issues. 
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  • Posted

    I asked a Urologist that question - it's got something to do with warming up your body by movement, definitely a physical reason, not sure if it's muscular or the bladder itself gets warmed up. That's why you should walk around a bit like jimjames wrote.
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  • Posted

    I have the same the problem
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