Problems with Tamsulosin

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Tamsulosin does not suit me. I have very serious allergic reactions to it.I have several other conditions which will normally exclude surgery including a Pacemaker. Is there an alternative oral treatment available? Proscar takes too long I believe and has unwanted side effects. Here's hoping!!!

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  • Posted

    Probably the best solution to your problem is to use intermittent catheters. They are simple to use. Your doctor can show you how in one minute and most insurance will cover their cost.
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  • Posted

    panamabob,

    Yes, there is an alternative to Tamsulosin. It is called Finasteride - a tiny blue tablet.

    You could see whether that suits you better. Good luck.

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  • Posted

    I too was on "Tamsulosin" for a couple of years.  It really destroys your sex life.  They should rename the drug and call it the "Castration Drug".  Iam off of it now and have a wonderful sex life. 
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  • Posted

    Hi Bob,

    First of all, a lot depends on exactly what are your bph symptons and also your IPSS score (International Prostate Sympton Score). Not all of us have the same symptons and therefore what works for one might not work for another. 

    But in general, as far as oral treatments go, you could try Dialy Cialis and see how you tolerate it. Studies show it works as well or better than Tamsulosin with a somewhat different side effect profile.

    Also, as suggested, CIC (clean intermittent catherization) is another option depending on what exactly what problems you are having with your bph. CIC enables you to empty your bladder completely, any time you want, and is therefore an option for anyone with retention issues, chronic or acute.  I chose CIC as an alterative to surgery for my bph and was able to rehabilitate my bladder to the extent that I no longer have to self catherize on a regular basis, nor do I need any drugs such as Tamsulosin.  

    Jim

     

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  • Posted

    Thankyou all for your very helpful responses.The Cialis idea sounds 'interesting'. I will suggest it to my GP. The CLC sounds scary. I hate needles etc but what ever I need to do will have to be done I guess. I live in Uk so insurance is not an issue. I have tried a couple of Alpha Blockers and the results are always the same. ie Negative.

    I take so many other 'chemicals' that it is just posible that Tamulosin is reacting with one or more of them.

    Metformin,Beta Blocker eye drops for Glaucoma,  Lipitor, Ramipril,Prednisolone,Zicron for Diabetes.Amlopodine and Diapamide for Blood Pressure. Pacemaker for Sick Sinus Syndrome.

    Any ideas always welcome.

                                                    Bob

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    • Posted

      The usual recommended dose is 5mg a day, but you could also start on 2.5mg a day and see how that goes. Since you're working with a GP, might also be a good idea to do a little web research and bring in some of the study articles on Daily Cialis and Bph, as it's a relatively new application and your GP may not be aware of it.  As to "CIC", it can be scary in the beginning, but most people get used to it quickly. It's a good alternative to consider for retention if you can't tolerate any drugs and don't want a surgery. But again, really depends on your exact  symptons and their severity. 

      Jim

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    • Posted

      I just want to affirm that CIC is very easy to learn and is a great "port in the storm".  It isn't nearly as bad as it sounds.  I went in to acute retention in July 14 and was on an indwelling catheter for 2 months.  My urologist wanted me to do the CIC but i told him I woulld never do it.  As soon as I learned it it was so much better.  It really is a useful skill and much more natural.  Something that sounds so strange, when done repeatedly, can seem very normal over time.  Probably better than the alternative  while you're deciding on your next move.  i use a Rochester Medical, Magic3 w/ a coude tip (size: 14french). 
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    • Posted

      Dear Bob,

      I was the first to recommend CIC to you and I notice that others on these posts agree, Now as to your other medications, try Betamax or Travatan for glaucoma, Welchol for cholesterol, and Metroporol or valsartan for high blood pressure. These medications have little or no side effects, They are generics at low cost and work better than the others. Discuss them with your physician.

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  • Posted

    Jim,

    I have just checked to see if N I C E has approved the Daily Use of Cialis for BPH and it has.Don't know if you are in USA or UK. I will put it to my GP and see if he agrees to let me try it. Maybe there is a lucky lady out there who can share the benefits.

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    • Posted

      I'm in the USA and Daily Cialis is FDA approved for BPH. I will send you a supporting study via Private Message that you might want to show to your GP. And yes, nice to know that that one of the side effects is a positive for sexual activity as opposed to the negative effects often reported by Tamsuloin and Proscar.

      Jim

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  • Posted

    Thanks Jim. I read the report from Texas with great interest and at first glance it does seem very compelling. I shall share it with my GP and hopefully he will allow me a trial.

    Many thanks Jim. You may well have given me life changing information. I have travelled fairly widely in USA and used to winter in Daytona Beach.

                                                         Bob

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    • Posted

      Good luck with your GP and do let us know if you are able to get daily Cialis. If not, hopefully you can find a urologist who will let you give it a try, because in some cases that may be all that is needed. 

      But regardless of how it works, keep positive and keep exploring  non-invasive ways to manage bph, especially since surgery does not appear to be an option for you right now. 

      Should things get to the point where medications and/or lifestyle changes aren't working, there's always CIC (self catherization) which should fix most bph issues, it certainly did for me, and as scary as it sounds initially, it's really simple and painless with a little practice.

      And, as others have suggested there are also some newer minimally invasive procedures out there like urololift and PAE that may have a better safety profile for you given your other issues. 

      Jim

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  • Posted

    panamabob,

    I located Frimley Partk hospital in Surrey who carry Urolift out on NHS. They promised to let me now the rules for GPs to refer me, but I haven't heard from them since last week. I will be calling them again.

    Regards

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  • Posted

    I am not a doctor, so I don't know if this is an option for you or not, but it might be possible for you to have a PAE, or Urolift under a spinal or even a saddle block anesthesia, rather than a general. It's worth checking into. These can be "local" neural blockages that don't "knock you out", and seem that they would be less of a problem for your pace maker.

    Neal

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