Random stabbing pain plantar fasciitis ?

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Yesterday I was shopping and kept feeling a stone or sharp object in my heel of my show I though nothing of it and went on With my day thinking it was a splinter maybe . Middle of the night my heel feels like a razor is slicing it open while laying. In bed. It comes and goes randomly and has level 10 pain. I can't sleep and stretching has made it feel worse! Is this plantars facilities? I have never expirience d this horrible of pan before?

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  • Posted

    Sounds horrible Adam. Mine came on more when I stopped moving. I sat down and when I stood up, the pain was unbearable to stand on. When I sleep, there may be a bit of a throbbing pain in the heel area, but nothing like what you described. I wonder if this is what a heel spur feels like.

    -Mo

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    • Posted

      I don't know what it is but if I try and do the massages on it it hurts so badly I scream. I am bed ridden now. And I dot. Know what to do

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  • Posted

    Rest and cushion as much as possible. Sounds like a tear that needs healing first before other treatment.
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  • Posted

    It sounds like PFalthough you need to see a doctor and maybe have an MRI scan.

    The problem can be getting to a doctor, I couldn't walk or drive and just about managed to hobblle from a taxi my last time.

    PF pain can be different but everyone will agree it is the most excruciating pain ever.

    Rest is the only option. I found sitting on the edge of the bath with my foot in a basin of water and the shower head constantly dribbling cold water for half an hour helped.

    At night I rest my foot under the ankle on a couple of pillows with no covers. It can take a few days before you can walk without screaming.

    The pain I felt varied between constant throbbing aches, feeling as though a car had run over my foor, sensation like hot ants crawling under the skin, and like someone had beaten the soles of my feet. Putting weight on the foot felt like a 1000 volt shock from my ankle to the top of my head.

    Sorry if I sound downbeat but rest, anti-inflammatories (ibuprofen or naproxen), alternate cold and hot compresses may help.

    But rest and keeping weight off the foot is the only real way to alleviate this miserable condition.

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    • Posted

      I have been able to walk on my foot a little each day but after about 20 min it get minor stabbing pains in it. Should I keep walking on it in my orthotics or just stay off it when that happens?
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  • Posted

    Certainly sounds like pf and/or a heel spur. The most important thing is to rest and cushion the heel as much as possible with gel heel pads which only cost a couple of quid so I have them in all my shoes. Wear trainers or walking boots as much as possible and take pain killers and use anti inflamatory gel on the heel and sole of the foot. Ice does help with the pain but not with curing the problem you are better with warm foot baths to soffen the tissue. PF is thought to be torn tissue so needs time to heal so rest and cushioning are the only answer untill you can get to see a doctor. Once the pain has receeded you can try calf streching exercises which take the strain off the pf tissue but let it heal first. It takes time, a couple of months and then you should find it dissapears as suddenly as it came but it is always liable to come back so continue with the stretching and the gel heel pads as you want to avoid that sort of pain ever again. Just google gel heel pads and the blue ones are the ones I get, there are insoles as well that can help, anything that takes the wieght off the heel is liable to help, some say high heels help but I draw the line at that.
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    • Posted

      Thank you for the advice, I was mostly wondering if it was PF because nowhere online could I find people describing pain when their foot was at rest. Did you have that problem too? I am considering getting crutches or a cain for the meantime to let it rest a bit. I simply don't see how waliking on a injured foot can allow it to heal.

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    • Posted

      It is bloody painful when you stand on it and when at rest it is more of a burning pain which faded if I had a warm foot bath for 30 mins of if I stood with my insole on a tennis ball and rolled my sole over it being careful not to touch the heel. As the area gets inflamed although there was no swelling me it takes time for the inflamation to go down so rest would be good but difficult as we have to move around unless we have a mother or wife to wait on us. I take indometacin for the pain as I find Naproxen upset my stomach. I had the pain for 6 months and I think it was the cushioning that allowed it to heal as I was still getting about but luckily I am retired so did not have to go to work with it.

      Try not to get too depressed because it does go away and stay away if you take care not to over do it, I walk 5 miles a day, at least, with the dog and swimming is good for it as its not wieght bearing and I also go skiing for a couple of weeks with no problem. Running is possibly a No,NO as it pounds the heel but with the right insoles it may still be possible. Hope all this helps as I found the Doctor was of no help just said you have pf, take painkillers but at least he confirmed it was nothing else.

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  • Posted

    Someone recently shared information they'd gotten from another earlier post. I copied it to my computer, maybe you'll find it helpful. It was apparently from someone who's written a book on PF, unfortunately, I don't know the person's name, I'd sure buy the book.

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    The term Plantar Fasciitis is a misnomer as the disease not an inflammation. It was proven that Plantar Fasciitis is the result of dying and decayed tissue. This means two things: 1) There is insufficient blood flow to the heel of the foot, 2) The tissue is undergoing continuous damage. Therefore you want to treat it by improving blood flow to the foot and supporting the anchor points of the plantar fascia so they do not undergo further damage through the healing process. In the long run, you also want to strengthen the muscles of the feet (which have become weak from wearing traditional footwear) so they can properly support the plantar fascia to prevent a relapse. Ideally, this process should take 6-weeks. In sever or chronic cases, it can take 8-weeks or a year.

    INCREASING BLOOD FLOW

    1. Try not to wear footwear that has the toe box pointing up (like traditional running shows). Pointing the toes up, causes the muscle of your great toe to press against the posterior tibial artery, which feeds blood to the plantar fascia.

    2. Soak your foot in warm water and Epsom salts every morning or night for at least 30 minutes, this will get blood flowing throughout your foot.

    3. Stand, lift your foot above the ground, and in an almost tip-toe position gently press your toes against the floor to crunch them in (your toes should be stretching in the opposite position then what they were in when you first stretched your toes and experienced the pain of plantar fasciitis - I have illustrations in my book). This will open the posterior tibial atery and flood the heel portion of the plantar fascia with blood. Keep your foot in this position for a full minute if you can. You may feel a throbbing pain in your heel, which means that the blood is flowing and the exercise is working. When done, life your foot and wiggle your toes to loosen things up and regulate blood flow.

    4. In contrast to traditional theory, do not stretch your toes upward, as you did when you first felt the pain of plantar fasciitis. This causes the plantar fascia to pull and creates tears in the anchor points of the plantar fascia at the heel (it can also create tears at the anchor points in the toes). You can do this to gently stretch your plantar fascia when you are in the shower and your foot is hot and flexible, but it must be a gentle stretch, only for a few seconds, and immediately followed by the exercise in step 3.

    5. Wear properly sized socks. Do not wear socks that are tight in the toe area. There is anecdotal evidence that this in itself may be a cause of plantar fasciitis.

    SUPPORTING THE PLANTAR FASCIA

    1. Do not run or walk excessively during the healing process. Try to stay off your feet as much as possible. If you must exercise, then try riding a bike - outside or stationary.

    2. Calf stretches every day are a must!

    3. Buy a roll of sports tape. Here in the US, Walmart sells a roll of the J&J brand for about $3. Every morning, until your foot is healed, run a piece of tape from left to right across the bottom of your heal (secured to the left and right sides of your ankles). This should basically be like a stirrup. Then run another piece across the bottom back of your heel (as low as possible) also secured to the left and right sides of your ankles (the tape should be at 90 degrees to the first piece). Run a final piece of tape at a 45-degree angle to the first two pieces. This final piece is the most important, so if you do not have time to do all three, then do the last one only. This will support the anchor points of your plantar fascia and keep them from further injury while they heal. When using the tape your heel may feel so good that you may think that you are cured - you are not. The tape is simply a crutch. Wear it for at least 6-weeks in conjunction with the advice shown above.

    There is more you can know, but what I provided should set you on the right track. I urge you and others to start this program immediately as long term cases of plantar fasciitis often result in irreparable damage leaving surgery as the only alternative.

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    -Mo

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  • Posted

    As I have said in previous posts PF can vary greatly from person to person. Also, as it is not a life threatening condition, there doesn't appear to be any concentrated research and knowledge about - it is mostly a 'try this and see if it helps' type of attitude, and if it doesn't try something else.

    PF is a nasty, cunning condition. From my own experience I can feel no pain on waking in the morning, think 'thank God it is gone', stand up and collapse in pain on the bed knowing yet another day of howling pain ahead. At other times it is a constant throbbing pain all day and all night, with many sleepless nights because it is impossible to find a comfortable position that takes stress from the foot.

    Be careful about pain killers - I have taken 3 or 4 times the recommended dose of Naproxen because I have had to get out and about. Beware, pain is telling you something is wrong, so when the pain killers wear off it can be far far worse than before.

    As I said before, I don't want to sound negative but once you have PF you seem to have it for life.

    Wear cushioning supportive shoes all the time, for business wear have gel insoles, and hopefully when this episode is over do calf stretches every day. I think this has helped me be PF free for nearly a year now - touch wood!!!

     

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    • Posted

      Wonderful to know that I have another condition to live with. I already suffer from mal dembarkment syndrome and benign faciculations that plague me. I'm beginning to think I'm cursed. At this point I may as well go. Disability because I can do anything anymore. Part of treating the other two sydromesnis being active, well that is out the window now. I guess I may as well just lay here and wait for the end.

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    • Posted

      Adam  I am sorry to hear you have other conditions but as I said PF is very painful when you have it, but given rest it will go away usually after several days.

      After that it just needs careful maintenance, wearing the right shoes, and may not trouble you for the rest of your life. As I said it is a year since I had a flare up and there is no reason, unless I am careless, that it will occur again.

      Only your doctor can advise and I sincerely hope you see this through and maybe others in this forum can give you some advice.

       

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    • Posted

      You are the first person I've heard say it goes away after a couple days of rest. Maybe the problem is most of us can't NOT walk on it even if only to go to the toilet. When you say there is no reason, unless you are careless, that it will occur again - what does careless look like? I've been dealing with this for a year now. I do have relief with inserts and wearing compression socks for plantar fasciitis, but dream of the day that it is gone.

      -Mo

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    • Posted

      Than you. I got some tape for it and a cane today so I can get around my house without to much pressure on it. It feel les painfull today but I still can't walk on it. The sharp stabbing is a full stabbing or tingling. Doesn't hurt much when I rest it on the couch and I've had it in a boot pretty much all day.

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    • Posted

      I think if you read some of my other posts you will see I say that PF does seem to vary a lot from person to person. For me it can be a couple of days but at worst it laid me up for 10 days and gave me a very stiff sore ankle for months after.  Flareups over the last twenty year s have found me imprisoned in a top floor hotel room in Calcutta for 6 days, holed up in a flat in Spain for Xmas and New Year because I was simply unable to walk. Going to the toilet at home (16 steps down and two up) takes about ten minutes hanging onto the banisters.

      When I say ‘careless’,  again I can only speak personally, and this could be stepping on an uneven surface or not climbing a kerb properly, and can only think it is something like this because if I am feeling 100% and just go to the shops and back, and the next day have a flare up – what causes it?

      I have been PF free for the last year although I still get some weird attacks like a really searing pain under the arch but only for about 30 seconds. Last week for two days my left foot felt as though it had been hit with a hammer,  this suddenly disappeared but was immediately followed by a searing arch pain in the other foot which fortunately went  after a day.

      I simply can’t explain all this, it is just part of the way PF affects me.  Wearing Asics gel shoes and Crocs and doing stretching exercises every day may have kept  PF away but who knows,  maybe they had nothing to do with it!!

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    • Posted

      Personally I have found berkinstock sandals have been my godsend. When I was first told about them I thought they would hurt me as they have such a hard foot bed but the shape of this actually really supported my feet and the pf really subsided. I was told to give them a few weeks before deciding whether they work or not. I wear them most of the time now and still stretch my calf muscles regularly.
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    • Posted

      Thanks. I was hoping to hear something that I could prevent in the area of being careless. I'm so tired of this pain.

      -Mo

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    • Posted

      Sorry I can't be more specific, it's just that PF causes and cures do vary so much there just isn't a single solution.

      I think everyone in this forum knows the excruciating and devestating pain PF can cause, the debilitating effect it has, and the depression that can follow.

      I hope yours clears up or lessens soon.

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    • Posted

      Thanks David. I should know that our bodies all respond differenctly. But I'm still looking for that magic cure. smile

      -Mo

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    • Posted

      Hi Mo,

      I can't say it's "magic" but I can tell you there's lots of clinical evidence around EPAT (Extracorporeal Pulse Activation Technology) sometimes referred to as ESWT or shockwave for successfully treating PF.

      These posts are so sad to read--the pain is obviously debilitating for so many.  For those who have tried rest and cushioning and are still in great pain, I'd suggest researching and finding a local podiatrist who can tell you more about EPAT.

      Treatments are 3-5 times, once per week for only 5-10 minutes each.  Prices for a series of treatments (3-5) may cost you anywhere from $450-$750 total.  But this non-invasive approach works.  

      I really hope you and others will look into it.

      Wishing you all the best and much relief soon!

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    • Posted

      Hi Mo,

      EPAT/ESWT is actually popular worldwide.  I just Googled "ESWT in India" and a couple of resources came up.

      Hope there's an opportunity near you to check out.

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