restless legs other symptoms

Posted , 7 users are following.

Does anyone have the following prolems re. restless legs. Firstly symptoms often begin whilst sitting down after becoming tired although they are mostly at night just after going to bed. 1. feet itch and feel hot 2. that heat seems to spread to my knees and between my legs (that is extremely uncomfortable).  3. brain seems 'fuzzy' and can't concentrate.

4. legs start moving and kicking. 5. to gain relief get out of bed and stand in the kitchen 6. Have an urge to eat anything and everything in the larder and this is causing me to gain weight. Eventually go back to bed and kick about until sleep comes. I have not slept with the wife for a year for fear of injuring her when I kick. Take Ropinerol and vitamins with iron.

 

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  • Posted

    I eat 4 bananas every day and have not noticed any improvement. I can relate to all of your symptoms especially the heat and the feet thing. I too get up every night and have food which for some reason calms things down, usually toast and hot milk. Someone on this forum recently pointed out that fava beans (broad beans) contain significant amounts of levodopa so am trying these.
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  • Posted

    Why do you take the  Ropinirole?  Is it because of the RLS? And the vitamins, are they prescribed?  

    Have you been back to your doctor to discuss this?  I'll put a link in a separate post and it looks as though the Ropinirole is causing the desire to eat everything you see and you should tell your doctor.

     

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    • Posted

      thank you for your reply Ropinerole is prescribed and the vitamins with iron due to suggestions on this site.  You are right Ishould go back to the doc but don't have much faith (look at one as though I am lieing or barmy)

       

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    • Posted

      There is an interactions checker on the link below, you input all the drugs you are taking and it tells you of any problems, this can include, for example, food and supplements.

      Is the Ropinirole prescribed for restless legs or Parkinsons?  If it is for the former, perhaps you should stop taking it and also the vitamins and see how you get on.

      You ought to go back to the doctor, perhaps see a different one if that is possible.  Tell him/her that this is affecting your quality of life because you aren't able to sleep with your wife because of the RLS

      Good luck Erik.

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  • Posted

    When I get RLS, it is caused by the drugs I am taking, most recently, Lansoprazole, prior to that, Ranitidine but nowhere as near as badly as with the Lansolprazole.  I also got it after I had been taking Hydroxyzine for 18 months.  Fortunately, I no longer have to take that.

     

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    • Posted

      Hi was very interested when you mentioned Lansoprazole ,I am assuming that is in the same group of drugs as Omeprazole which I have taken for years. I get very back RLS and have not had a good nights sleep for years some nights no sleep at all ,I am also suffering from an anxiety disorder lately ,do you think there may be a link between your Lansoprazole and your R L S 
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    • Posted

      Hi Marilyn, yes, there is a definite link.  I did a lot of Googling and found quite a lot of info on it.  They are PPIs.  I also developed severe bloating and abdo pain and read that Lansoprazole in particular caused these problems that I developed and the average time frame, was 4 weeks.  I took it for 6 weeks.  I no longer take it.  I am not due to see the ENT guys again for about a month but I still take the Gavison Advance that they gave me to take and I have tried Ranitidine, which my GP had prescribed previously but the 150mg triggers RLS.  I have, in the past, bought some fromTesco, which is 75mg and I can take that occasionally.

      I'll see if I can find the links that I was looking at and pm them to you.  It might not be immediately though!

       

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    • Posted

      Thank you am finding that link very interesting have been taking Omeprazole for approx 10 years and thanks to you have found a possible link . I will google it myself but thank you for offering to help . 
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    • Posted

      Have you also read that PPIs can leach calcium from your bones?  It mentions the possibilty of 'fractures' near the end of the insert with Lansoprazole.  Ranitidine/Zantac doesn't have this problem.

      Have you ever had a DXA scan?  Perhaps you should ask to be referred for one.

       

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    • Posted

      No have,t read that but did fracture my ankle last year when a dog ran into me ,,have been shocked by the reports on omeprazole but suffer from gastritis and do get real problems will have to find something to replace the ppi as have awful R L S and now anxiety which isn't,t helped by sleepless nights ,thank you for bringing it to my attention just knew  medication helped with stomach problems but have had to increase dose to get same relief had not had what I thought were side-effects from them
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    • Posted

      Perhaps you could try the Ranitidine instead, it doesn't leach calcium and you might be able to take it for a while before you get RLS.  I was told to take the Gaviscon Advance after every meal and before bed aswell.  I have certainly slept better, since I started the Gaviscon Advance [prescription only] and haven't taken the Lansoprazole for about a month.  
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    • Posted

      I copied this from a website.  

      The Drugs link above, has a very good interactions checker on it, which you need to use

      H2 blockers are generally very well tolerated. They occasionally produce abdominal pain, allergic reactions, palpitations or mood changes.

      The biggest precaution one must take with H2 blockers is that they frequently interact with other medications. Before you use these drugs - even the OTC kind - you should check with your doctor to make sure they are safe for you.

      How Are H2 Blockers Different from Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs)?

      Both PPIs and H2 blockers suppress gastric acid secretion, but at different stages of production.. While histamine blockers block one of the first stimuli for acid production, proton pump inhibitors block the final step in the pathway of acid secretion in the stomach, resulting in greater suppression of acid.

      PPIs have a delayed onset of action, while H2 Blockers begin working within an hour. PPIs work for a longer period of time; most up to 24 hours and the effects may last up to three days. H2 blockers, however, usually only work up to 12 hours.

      This means that H2 blockers are most often used occasionally (when there is an acute flare-up of heartburn, for instance), while PPIs are used for longer periods of time (often, for a 2-week course of therapy) in an attempt to get a more chronic condition under control.

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