Should i go with my hubby to his PIP assessment

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Hubby has got his PIP assessment on  Tuesday 21st of this month. Its at 9.30 in the morning and my illness is at its worse in the mornings, M.E. Thing is im too waiting for own letter to come asking me to apply for PIP if i wish to do so.   How can i be seen struggling in with him only to be seen myself maybe in a few weeks time, I would be putting down that i feel at my worst in the mornings!  Ive been adviced by my daughter inlaw no way should i go with him and to let our son go in with him but he says no he will go in on his own, just wants to get it over and done with. I feel like im letting him down if i dont go. 

Sue 

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  • Posted

    Susan make sure sonenone goes with him otherwise that will go against him in assessment, they done that to me, also take notes or even record interview as they lie thro there teeth
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  • Posted

    Hi Sue,

    Chris is right, it is really adviseable for someone to go with your hubby and considering your own problems and possible claim, then I agree it shouldnt be you. I'm sure the last thing that your hubby thinks, is that you are letting him down.  I'm sure that some people go on their own, but if your son is willing to go, then why jeopardize the claim by going alone.  Plus the fact it is another pair of ears.

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    • Posted

      He does think im letting him down, said now on 3 occasions i thought you were coming with me. making me feel guilty.   I keep explaining about it jepodising things for me but he doesnt get it.   sad

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    • Posted

      I'm sorry Sue, I can imagine how you are feeling and it's not fair on you. 

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    • Posted

      I`m so sorry Sue. I hope when all of this is over and you both get the awards you deserve that he will see why you had to make this difficult decision.
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  • Posted

    Hi Susan

    I totally agree with Sukes that someone should go with your husband but not you.

    As Chris said, whoever goes with your husband should make note (in my opinion, it might be better for this to be "mental notes" and for your husband and whoever goes with him to compare these after leaving the assessment. Whilst it is true that the assessment can be recorded, there are rules over this - you have to advise the assessment company (in your husband`s case, Atos) in advance that you wish to do this and they will ask the assessor. If the assessor does not agree, the company will appoint another assessor. But, as the assessment is not too far away, this might not be possible or the date of the assessment might be changed to accomodate this.

    One important fact to bear in mind with regards to assessment - claimants are watched from the moment they arrive, such as entering the building, and how the claimant manages with walking from the waiting area to the assessment room and how far this is, and actions and reactions during the assessment.

    I only point this out so you are aware and in no way intend to add to any stress you might be feeling.

    Although this all might seem daunting, try to stay strong and focussed and if there is anything you wish to know or share feel free, as I am sure others have been through the process and can offer help, advice and support. We might have different disabilities but we are all victims of "the system" and together we can and will win what is rightfully ours.

    Steve

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    • Posted

      Thanks Steve,  mmmm like you said you are being assessed from the moment you walk into the building so if its more than 20 yards away to the room then ive read thats it, youve already failed to keep the mobility side of the PIP. So you cant record secretly on ones mobile phone! lol 

      Sue 

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    • Posted

      Hi Sue

      Noooo. Please don`t do that. If the assessor discovers "covert" recording he or she can end the assessment and this will be reported and there is every chance you`ll lose PIP.

      Steve

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    • Posted

         Well no, i wont be, as you say darnt risk it. but if they are being honest they shouldnt really object though. 

       

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    • Posted

      Just remember it's not about a diagnosis it's about how the condition/s affect you daily. There's a lot of possitive stories out there we just don't hear about them.

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    • Posted

      Further to this, I have discussed the following in The Mirror 9 Jan 2017

      In House of Commons, Christina Rees (Lab MP) asked Penny Mordaunt (Disabilities Minister):

      "Would the minister consider introducing and funding mandatory use of body cameras by all contracted-out assessment providers?

      [This] will improve the accuracy and efficiency of the much disputed health assessment reports as well as safeguarding claimants and assessors"

      Reply from Penny Mordaunt:

      "There are detailed improvement plans for both PIP and ESA. But one of the things that is being looked at is how assessments are recorded.

      And if [Ms Rees] would like to write to me with any specific suggestions she`s had, I`ll be happy to look at them"

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    • Posted

      Very interesting SteveformBrum what is needed is a camera showing what the assessor is writing down at the same time a recording showing what the claimant said to ensure that the truth is written down. This would put an end to any assessor writing anything different down to what the claimant said.  It was written down that my son drove himselfe there when infact he told them he got a friend to drive him as due to his back problem he couldnt possibly have driven the distance himself.

      Sue 

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    • Posted

      Good point, Sue.

      At the moment, we are not allowed to see, at the end of the assessment, what notes the assessor has written. If we could see this, at the end of the assessment - before we leave and before the assessor write up the assessment, then we could correct something has written, which would at least go some way towards preventing some distortion of the truth.

      I realise that this suggestion is not foolproof and the assessor could still record things on the assessment forwarded to DWP after the claimant has left. 

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    • Posted

      Yes Stevefrombrum, think of how much time and costs this would cut down and people having to appeal if this could be sorted out there and then on the day! If the assessor knew they were being filmed then they wouldnt dare lie anyway so the case of oh they lied simply wouldnt happen.  A simple solution and a fair outcome every time.  Works both ways if recorded and the claimnet said i never said that, well when looked at again this one would be solved as well so an all rounder solution for everyone.  Though as you say not full proof sadly. 

       

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    • Posted

      Good point, Sue, about it working both ways.

      Seriously, this should be put (by a symapthetic MP and, yes, there are a few) to Penny Mordaunt. I wouldn`t hold my breath that she would listen, understand or impliment this, but at least it would be a step in the right direction.

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