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Hi,

I'm 49 yrs old and on 7th April I'm due "The works." I have two fibroids one about 8cm the other not far behind and have suffered with painful, heavy, prolonged periods for who knows how long.

One problem I have is I'm not sure I want or need my ovaries removed.

The consultant said they'd take them in case there was ever a problem further down the line but is it really necessary? I've read that going through surgical menopause is worse than going through it naturally. A friend said I'm probably going through it anyway (if I am, I have no symptoms) but that doesn't mean I want to be launched into it in this way; especially having to deal with everything else after the operation. I also read, with surgical menopause, there's more chance of developing heart disease and cognitive disorders such as dementia.

I'm due at the hospital on 14th March for another injection, can't remember what it's called but it's to shrink the fibroids before the operation. I Don't know if I'll be seeing the consultant again then or just a nurse; can't see them wasting a consultant's time on an injection, I dunno confused

If I don't see the consultant does anyone know when I will? Sorry, I've never been through a major operation before so not sure what to expect or how things work.

I'm also not sure how I feel. In fact I don't seem to feel anything, it's as if life is just going on as normal but that doesn't feel right. This may sound silly but I'm more bothered that I don't feel anything than I do at the prospect of the operation itself. I'm concerned that it will hit me hard either just before or after the operation. I think I'm just weird, pity that can't be fixed along with my fibroids. 😣

Any thoughts or advice would be much appreciated..

So, sorry for the essay eek

Many thanks,

Esmay x

 

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  • Posted

    Hi, Esmay,

    I understand surgical menopause is scary.  I am wondering why the consultant wants to remove your ovaries.  Perhaps it might be best to ask him or her. In some circumstances, it's probably better to keep your ovaries if you can.  

    Frankly, I've not seen anything about women who undergo surgical menopause being more likely to have heart problems or dementia.   It's difficult to relate just a lack of female hormones directly to those problems. So many other things contribute to what occurs, relative health, nutrition, environment and one's heredity.

    Also, I would want to know what group sponsored the study, why it was done.  Not all studies are valid, but they're still widely quoted, for instance, was the study sponsored by a drug company? I've had courses in methods of statistical research, and what "passes" for good research often isn't.

    So, I suggest you speak with your consultant prior to the surgery, if possible. Then, you can make the decision that's right for you!

    Best of luck, and let me know how you get on!

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    • Posted

      Hi Lynda,

      When I said I read something, what I mean is I read that someone else had read something.redface Having said that I also read a newspaper article on it but that doesn't make it true of course.rolleyes

      They may want to take everything because of my family history. My mam died aged 57, she started bleeding again after going through menopause. I can't remember where the cancer started though, my memory just gets worse.

      My sister-in-law has just told me it was her ovaries so that's made my mind up for me.

      Thank you

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    • Posted

      Hi Esmay,

      I think that's an excellent decision!  The family history issue is certainly a good reason.

      I have a friend whose wife died of ovarian cancer.  She was undiagnosed for 2 years because her doctor assumed she was "too young" to have such a disease.  It was devastating.  She got to be with her first grandchild for 1 month prior to her death.  She fought for life with such courage!

      I'm so sorry to learn that your mother passed because of this devastating illness!  

      I think you'll do well after surgery. It's a change that requires some getting used to.  The fat in your body will produce some estrogen, though.

      Please let me know how you get on, Esmay!  xxx

       

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    • Posted

      Hi Lynda,

      sorry for the late reply, I've been away and I can't seem to catch up with all the notifications.

      Really sorry to hear about your friend's wife. It's so sad they didn't catch it in time and such a shame that her and her first grandchild didn't get to know each other.

      My mam was only 57 when she died. I think I am a little scared the same thing could happen to me though I try not to think about it too much; that's why I'm having them removed.

      I'm still not feeling too bad at the prospect of the operation but I am feeling apprehensive at what will come after. I'm reading about menopause and hrt to become better informed but not sure it's helping matters, lol..cheesygrin

      Many thanks for your kind words

      x

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    • Posted

      Hi Esmay,

      Thanks for your reply.  I think that it's good that you're having them removed, no matter how much you go through with surgical induced menopause, it's definitely not as bad as having cancer!  

      I think you have a good attitude, and though you will experience some consequences from the surgery, you'll be able to go on to live a healthy life! xx

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  • Posted

    Esmay - sounds your lack of worry about this is you are well and truly ready to get rid of these over the top periods, heavy bleeding.

    Having been there and done this whole pelvic clearance issue, I had a massive bleed in the middle of the night, apparently a small blood vessel broke in my uterus, or was torn, needed 3 units of blood to be able to do D & C, my blood count was so low, 10 days later hysterectomy, suspicous cells found in D & C.

    Hysterectomy and pelvic clearnce easy under spinal block and heavy sedation, wasn't aware of anything until the following day, and spinal block kept me from any pain.

    The only problem I had was I went into some kind of hormonal shock, the hospital after a fight with me got it under control, symptoms, extreme sweating, it was crazy, soaking wet the whole time with hot flush on top of hot flush, apparently quite rare to happen a few days after surgery, they struggled with even keeping me hydrated, veins kept closing down, and I couldn't keep down even water.

    Found out years later I was allergic to morphine, so maybe it was even that rather than hormonal, had really nasty reaction to morphine after hip replacement, not quite the same, but constant vomiting.

    Heavy dose of hormes given, and came right, spoke to specialist later and he told me he would like me to stop taking such a high dose, took me about 2 years of slowly reducing dose with help of local GP, until now I take none.

    Only problem now I am 65 is dryness below, suppositries have solved that problem, and given me back the tiny amount of hormone I need.

    You will be fine after the healing up time, lack of red week, is such a relief, and the sanitary savings noticed in the family budget as well.

    I don't think at 49 you are planning on having more children, that was one of the questions i was asked as well, I fell about laughing at the Dr and told him he had to be kidding, I was the same age you are at the time, and had my adult children.

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    • Posted

      You could be right there Lyn, I think I'm now resigned to the whole thing. I was first diagnosed with fibroids 5 years ago but have been suffering longer than that; things were just getting worse the last year or so.

      You definitely went through a bad time, hope mine is easier than that. I'm going to let them take my ovaries now but I'm a bit apprehensive not knowing what to expect.

      I can't wait until I have no more periods. Sanitary does cost a fortune, especially when you forget how many and what you've got then go buy more.

      I've never had children, never wanted any either except when I was younger and thought it would be easier than getting a job; it isn't of course.eek I've never regretted not having any either, too late now if I did.

      Thank you smile

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  • Posted

    I have to say that I find it not necessary to remove things that aren't actually causing a problem. I would keep my ovaries if it was me. Easier for Surgeon to just remove everything but he isn't the one to be plunged into immediate menopause. Just adding my 2 cents worth

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    • Posted

      I know what you mean Robyn and if it wasn't for my mam getting cancer of the ovaries I was going to tell the consultant I wanted to keep them. Now I think it's best, just in case. And your 2 cents worth means a lot so thank you smile

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    • Posted

      Oh oh oh. Your family history certainly changes my opinion. So sad for your Mam & you. Trouble is ovarian cancer is called "the silent cancer" as you don't usually get any symptoms until it's all too late. So get those potential nuisances packed up and gone. There's quite a chance you will cope ok post-op with the changes ahead. We're all with you all the way. Shoulders to lean on. The reason I'm still on here when my surgery (nowhere near as extensive as yours) was 15mths ago! Plus I'm a Registered Nurse so I really (enjoy or love seem inappropriate words) also want to keep learning from others experiences & help if I can.

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    • Posted

      Thank you Robyn

      I'm still scared but still going ahead with it.

      As awful as it is you've all had to go through this, I'm so grateful you're here to give advice and support and hopefully just so I can vent, that really does mean a lot.

      x

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  • Posted

    Hi Essay,

    This is a very emotional and close to home topic for me as i also had a full hysterectomy due to fibroids 4 years ago. If the Consultant has said they recommend removing your ovaries just "in case" of issues further down the line I would definitely question this further while you are still in a position to. Removing both ovaries is a huge deal and having been through this journey and all the challenges every since, if I could turn back the clock I would have questioned more much before the op was done. I hope everything works out as best it can for you.

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    • Posted

      Hi Liz,

      I'm sorry you went through that, I definitely don't want to end up in that position.  I will talk to the consultant and find out if it really is in my best interests.

      Under the circumstances, with where my mam's problems started, I will most likely end up having my ovaries removed but it won't hurt to talk  about it and hearing other people's experiences, thoughts and advice really does help.

      Thank you so much 😊

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    • Posted

      Your welcome. Now knowing your family history makes more sense why they have suggested removing ovaries. At least after further discussion with consultant you'll be able to make a decision you are happy with and know is right for you to avoid being left doubting or regretting it which is hard to live with. Truly wish you well with everything. X

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