TNR ? I HAVE FOUND AN INJECTION THAT IS WORKING

Posted , 8 users are following.

I posted a question on this site some weeks ago but did not receive any replies, I was trying to find out the best method for TNR and  was finally booked in for 1st week Sept. Perhaps my surgeon gave me too much information which made me start looking around to see if there was any alternative to this operation as it when its done - its done and there is now turning back.

After much research I came across a Knee injection called Synvisc, which is a fluid made up of polymers produced from chicken combs of all thing ! this simulates the cartilage so I thought before having the op I would give it a go. Bupa authorized the treatment, which consisted of 3 injections over a 3-week period. The last injection was 2 weeks ago and all I can say is that I no longer have any knee pain and can walk a fair distance. I have been told by the doctor who administered the injection not to expect any miracle cure and that the treatment may only last for 6 months, but after saying that he did say that there is no limit to how many of these injections you can have - unlike a steroid injections as they can be harmful. I still have the stiff knee problem if I have been sitting around too long but my friends who have had the TKR have this problem also. So before you take the plunge I thoroughly recommend this knee injection. There are several on the market but the Synvisc was the innovator and it is working for me. I hope this little ray of hope helps anyone contemplating a TNR - 

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  • Posted

    Hello Jude from what you say I assume Synvisc is only available privately.  I am waiting for an appointment to see the consultant I have OA in both knees.  I do not know if they will recommend TKR but am worried about the prospect because I have other health problems including OA in neck and spine and am worried that I would not be a good candidate.  With regard to Synvisc I would not be able to afford it privately but am so happy it has worked for you and I hope it does delay the need for TKR.  All the best to you
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    • Posted

      Hi Libralady 13

      yes you are correct - this type of injection is not currently  available 

      on NHS but as BUPA has now recognised it as a temporary cure

      My invoice for the 3 injections and 3 locals was £525 which BUPA paid for compared with a TKR cost ranges from £10k to £14k so I am sure it will not be long before NHS catch on to this. You never know it may well be a good idea to ask your GP - Thanks and best of luck with your problem

       

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  • Posted

    I am in the US and medicare covers the injection, which runs around $800 USD. The PVNS tumor had eroded the viability of the joint to the point that none of the orthopods would even consider.the option. As it was explained to me, the organism has to have the ability to make satisfactory contact with the base tissue of the joint. From there is starts it's growth and conectivity and actually grows supportative tissue that strengthens or replaces the natural tissue. No connection, no growth and no healing. I was willing to give it a go but the docs were all thumbs down so that ended that. These decisions came from both private practice physicans and those in the University teaching arena.
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    • Posted

      hi oldfat guy,

      Sorry but I dont quite understand your reply and not sure that we are talking about the same thing- this 3 part injection does not start a re-growth of the cartilage, as it was explained to me in laymans terms its a bit like putting some WD40 in the joint and is expected to last up to six months, when I was waiting for the injection in the operating theatre the nurse told me that she has been having two per year for the past 3 years to stave off a TKR she said that it works for her and all I can say is that it is working for me. The only advice I have been given since completing the course of injections is not to lift heavy weights and to excersize as mush as possible. Best of luck with your problem anyway

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  • Posted

    Oh, How I wish this had come up before I had my knee replacement ! Having exceeded the usual amount of Cortisone injections, three arthroscopies and one synevectomy, I was unaware of any alternative to my Total Knee Replacement... so, after coping with the pain for over twelve years. i am now eight weeks after surgery and it has been horrendous, to say the least !!  Hope everyone who reads this post from you, requests information from their consultant prior to having this most painful and debilitating operation !
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    • Posted

      Hi jane

      thnsk for reply - yes thats is the reason that I checked all possibilites before committing to the op -It has worked so well for me my wife said that I should go on this site and tell evryone how good it is. Surley if enough people request the injection route from their GP - the NHS should start paying for this wonderful semi cure. I beleive that some day soon the invetor of the Synvisc will come up with a more lasting solution to the cartiledge replacement problem. Prof Tim Briggs, a very eminent and respected Knee Surgeon who I saw earlier this year is working on a re- growth hormone for the replacement. My two friends who have had TKR were not told about this alternative treatment method and now both wish that they had waited and researched a bit more. You will get over this but it does take time one of my friends is now 10 months into it and is still having problems but the key is to keep up the daily excersize. As I've said before this injection has put me back with the land of the living.

      kind regards

       

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  • Posted

    You say it only last for around 6 months? does this mean that to continue being pain free you pretty much have to have the injections every x amount of months untill there is a more permanent soloution?
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    • Posted

      HELLO WARBO

      yes that is correct I have been told that it could last 6 months or even longer depending on what I do. Avoiding lifting heavy weight etc. but walking is not off the menue, as I have just come back from a visit to Bletchley Park and walked around the museum for over 4 hours without any problem. In fact my wife said that she needed to sit down and have a break. The master plan is to keep on with the injections until a more premanent cure is found which is currently being developed.

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  • Posted

    Hello Jude. I was given a SynviscOne injection in each knee last Monday. I have had OA in my knees for about 8 years and have been suffering from pain in my hips for 3 years. I've been through the usual pain killers, anti inflammatories, tramacet and the pain got so bad the last script I had was for morphine patches. Had physio, 2 steroid injections in both knees and one topical steroid injection in my hip, none of which had any effect at all. I was finally referred to an orthopaedic surgeon who had me in for a local diagnostic injection in my hip under a general anaesthetic, which seeped into the femoral nerve causing femoral palsy for a day until it wore off. He then tried a local in one knee which helped the stiffness until it wore off. The SynviscOne is a single injection and dare I say, after 5 days, I am already feeling some slight improvement and less stiffness. I was fortunately offered  it on the NHS, so from the comments from other replies, I regard myself pretty lucky. If this works, the surgeon says he will inject a similar gel into my hips, although it will have to be done under a general anaesthetic again. Fingers crossed! Don't have to go back now for 3 months. I hope your Synvisc continues to work for you. 

     

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    • Posted

      Very good. I've known several people that have had success. Generally the orthopods can tell who has a pretty good chance of being helped. Because it is an expensive injection most won't go too far out on a limb recommending potential failures. They wouldn't even discuss it with me and a couple of others I know were turned down. Hope you continue to get good relief.
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    • Posted

      As someone mentioned that they only paid £500 for the 3 injections ?

      Hello oldfatguy- sorry to refer to you like this but I dont know what else to call you ??!! just had another 3 Synvisc this time at my own expense as BUPA will only pay for the first set of injections and not on-going treatment, Not too bad and walking better with less paid, but probably not as good as results 6/8 months ago the worst bit that hurt the most was paying out to £1500 myself !! now that really hurt !!??? will post an update in around 3/4 weeks this was with the Blackberry Clinic - does any one know of anywhere else doing this kind of treatment in the UK ?  All the best to you all Jude

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    • Posted

      For that kind of money I'd want a written guarantee of success. Hope it gives you some good relief. I was interested in the one posters comments that they had a single injection synvisc used on them. That's the 1st time I had heard of that product.
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  • Posted

    Yes, that was me. It's called SynviscOne. There is quite a lot of info on it online and it appears to be basically the same as the one Jude has, except one injection should be enough. Maybe the dosage is greater. Will let you guys know if it works. Seemed to have two good days, but today I'm limping around again. I live in hope! 
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    • Posted

      Hi Jackie

      now that is very intersting as the blackberry clinic told me that they used to administer the Synvisc one this proved unsuccessful and  are now only offering Syvnvisc 3 which is obviously more expensive as 3 injections are involved over a 3week period. My £1500 costs did not include any local anasetics - it would be really helpfull for everyone if you could tell us how much did you paid for the 1 injection and by whom ?

      many thanks Jude

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  • Posted

    Hi Jude, in reply to your query, I paid nothing as it was provided by the NHS, although I have been seeing the orthopaedic surgeon at a private hospital, also paid for by the NHS. I was given the option to choose which hospital I wanted to go to and it was a no brainer to select our local private hospital, Mount Stuart. I have done quite a bit of research on the differences between Synvisc and SynviscOne and the only difference I can see is that you need only one injection instead of 3. The dose is bigger. Online, you can purchase the SynviscOne, doctors prescription only, for £299.60. I had no anaesthetic with it and it really wasn't any more painful than the cortisone injections were. I sort of get the impression that your clinic are taking advantage by charging you such an extortionate amount. The info also says the three and the One both last a long as each other- generally around 6 months. Maybe they're right, but I would tend to be a little cynical!! 
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