Watching a dermoid

Posted , 6 users are following.

Question for those with dermoids:

Is anyone else just "watching" the dermoid without having it removed right now?

I know that they eventually have to be removed, but some doctors suggest watching with frequent ultrasounds if they aren't too large.

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  • Posted

    Hi Margie everyone has their own opinion about dermoids. I'm not sure they definitely have to be removed - - I guess that depends on age & size. I'm 46 & mine was found by chance 2 years ago. It was 35mm & now is 40mm. I have no symptoms. I'm lucky enough to be scanned at UCH where their equipment is marvelous. My consultant has advised management/watching because of size & no symptoms. My opinion is I don't want to put myself through surgery until I really need to.

    Dermoids are slow growing.

    I hope this is helpful.

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  • Posted

    Hi margie!

    I'm having mine removed as is been growing and I'm 27 and trying to conceive. So I need all the help I can get! Mines 7.5CM and I'm having it removed in two weeks!

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  • Posted

    If the Dermoids are small then they watch and wait.But once they hit 5 cm plus then the best thing is removal.Ive had one 10cm Dermoid on each Ovary.They were 6cm when discovered and grew to 10cm within 3 months.Both were removed with Ovaries and fallopian tubes.

    Its different for every woman.Just make sure you're being monitored and get good medical advice.

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  • Posted

    If the Dermoids are small then they watch and wait.But once they hit 5 cm plus then the best thing is removal.Ive had one 10cm Dermoid on each Ovary.They were 6cm when discovered and grew to 10cm within 3 months.Both were removed with Ovaries and fallopian tubes.

    Its different for every woman.Just make sure you're being monitored and get good medical advice.

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  • Posted

    I'm watching mine Margie. I'd like to try and have a child before removing it. I know there's a risk it can twist, but right now I'm ovulating from both ovaries and have a reasonable ovarian reserve with follicles both sides. It's more than a lot of women have. If it's not bothering me, why should I bother it?

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    • Posted

      How large is yours if you don't mind me asking?

      I got pregnant with one ovary that has a dermoid (other ovary was removed years ago)...but I lost the pregnancy (my third daughter) at 22 weeks.

      Now we are going to have to start ttc again..it's so depressing!

      I always had a good AMH and plenty of follicles too with my cyst! Good luck to you!

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    • Posted

      Hi margie

      Mines 5 cm.

      Yes I was very surprised when the gynaecologist said he had another patient with just one ovary with a dermoid and he advised her not to remove it. She got pregnant and had a baby, but hers is only 2cm.

      How big is yours?

      There is definitely hope. I spoke to the ultrasound lady and she's seen women get pregnant and go to full term with one ovary.

      Take care xx

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    • Posted

      Are you on the UK?

      My AMH is 9.6. He says I have a 'reasonable' reserve and when I had ultrasound I had ovulated from ovary with the cyst in it. There was a corpus luteum.

      I will keep my fingers crossed you get pregnant again. Good luck to you as well xx

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    • Posted

      Mine is 4.3, I am in the US.

      I'm glad to hear of someone else who is waiting to have it removed. I feel like removing it at this second might cause more damage to the ovary.

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    • Posted

      Yes I think you're right especially as you only have one ovary. From all the articles I read any ovarian surgery causes a decrease in AMH. My AMH has been stable last two years so I can't see how the cyst is in itself is damaging the ovary.They also say having the dermoid removed doesn't significantly improve the functioning of the ovary or the success of IVF. The main risk that we face is torsion - but that seems relatively rare.

      It's exactly what I thought - the dermoid is inside the ovary. How can they cut into the ovary and cut it out without some damage to the ovary itself? It's impossible I think. If you can get a good surgeon there will be less damage, but I think there will always be some damage. I think having the cyst removed is as damaging as the cyst itself to be honest.

      I

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    • Posted

      I am glad I found you! It's hard to find someone else who isn't planning to do surgery immediately.

      I have heard that surgery hurts the AMH as well.

      As soon as I get pregnant again and have a healthy take-home baby, I will have the cyst removed for sure!

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    • Posted

      I think people rush into things. There is an attitude that they must have an operation, they must do something without thinking of the aftermath. Instead we have asked ourselves what can they do and will it help our goal (to get pregnant).

      Yes - I'm glad I found you as well.

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    • Posted

      Honestly they are very slow growing - like 2mm a year if that. They are not going to double in size in a year and from what I've read expectant management during pregnancy a possible. It's very easy to get over treated for gynaecological problems. Some remove ovary to treat cyst - it's throwing the baby out with bath water.

      I will keep my fingers crossed you get pregnant soon xx

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    • Posted

      On average they grow slowly I stated. they can monitor in such an event remove as they did in your case. I feel like I'm not even entitled to a opinion. The majority of dermoids are slow growing.

      I'm done with this forum to be honest. It's full of scaremongering. Women who opt for conservative management should be entitled to the same support as those that opt for the surgical route.

      It's all worse possible case scenarios on here. Yet thousands of women are over treated every year with unnecessary hysterectomies and oopherectomy. If you've ever read the castrated women you will know of the terrible side effects of surgical menopause.

      Surgeons are not miracle workers. They are not God. There are limits to what they can do and no treatment is without a side effect. Women who consider whether the benefits outweigh the risks should not be made to feel like they are bad people. I have a choice and if I choose conservative management for whatever reason that's my right and anyone else's. Not being have to have children is life altering.

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    • Posted

      cheesygrin It seems I am not entitled to my experience of faster growth of a wee benign dermoid and happiness to have gotten it out ovary saving and gotten pregnant real quickly.

      Anyone can do as they think and often are plain lucky, too. Some are not. No one shoe fits all.

      If people drink unpasteurised milk, fine, if they give it to their children and nothing happens, lucky, they cannot advocate it still, since e.hemol. is a children killer, if the milk was infected. If milk was not contaminated, it can't do harm. If a tumor is not contaminated with cancer, if it doesn't press on structures, it can't do harm, fully correct.

      The IF is the problem that no one knows in any situation.

      Like some would have been better off without treatment, some got a dodgy surgeon and unlucky procedure, for others it was a thing caught in time and health saving....

      who knows, no one will.

      Hence collect info. But what happened to one, might not happen to the other. Fully correct too.

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